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Latest Alleged Leaked Image of iPhone 7 Depicts Larger Rear Camera

Two images have emerged online this morning allegedly showing the rear cases of an iPhone 7 and 7 Plus leaked from the Chinese supply chain.

The first image posted by French site nowhereelse.fr claims to show the back of the upcoming 4.7-inch iPhone 7 with the expected antenna bands restricted to the edges of the casing, rather than running along the rear.

Alongside the usual microphone and LED flash, it also appears to show a larger protruding camera cut-out, which is consistent with rumors that the device will feature a larger back camera with likely improved CMOS sensor.

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Interestingly, Engadget's take on the same alleged leak cites a couple of claims from its source at Chinese repair shop Rock Fix that we've heard before. One is that the headphone jack is "here to stay" on the 4.7-inch handset, the other is that the iPhone 7 will come in two flavors: a base model to replace the iPhone 6, alongside the expected flagship model.

The first claim comes despite widespread and apparently confirmed rumors indicating that Apple will switch exclusively to Lightning and Bluetooth audio output for wired and wireless headphones.

The second claim appears to be associated with an earlier leaked image from Rock Fix depicting a trio of iPhone 7 and 7 Plus display components that could just as easily be from early prototype stages. Both claims seem unlikely at this late stage in the rumor cycle.

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Meanwhile, the alleged shot of an iPhone 7 Plus case depicts the now-familiar pill-shaped camera enclosure, corroborating widely circulated rumors that Apple plans for a superior dual-lens camera to be exclusive to the larger 5.5-inch handset.

In the close-up shown here, the top of the plastic shell enclosing the case also appears to have an unusual opening in the centre. Nowhereelse.fr suggests this could indicate the presence of a sensor or port of some kind, although such an inclusion would be unusual at this location.

Apple is expected to announce the iPhone 7 series in September. The smartphones are also expected to retain iPhone 6s-like designs with faster Apple A10 processors, dustproofing and waterproofing, and faster LTE and Wi-Fi.

Related Roundup: iPhone 7
Tag: nowhereelse.fr

tvOS 10 Overview: Single Sign-On, Dark Mode, New Siri Abilities and More

tvOS, the operating system that runs on the fourth-generation Apple TV, is also set to receive some updates this fall alongside iOS, macOS, and watchOS.

tvOS isn't getting as many changes as these other operating systems, but as can be seen in the video below, there are some important new features being added that make it easier to find content and easier to watch live television.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

New in tvOS 10 is Siri's ability to search for movies by topic, bringing up content around a theme. Queries like "Show me high school comedies from the 80s" or "Find me movies about dinosaurs" now work. Siri's also gaining the ability to open live channels directly through a Live Tune-In feature that works when you say something like "Watch CBS News" or "Watch ESPN," and Siri can also manage HomeKit accessories.

At WWDC, Apple mentioned that YouTube search is on the way, allowing users to ask Siri to find cute kitten videos or videos of hamsters eating tiny burritos, but that's actually a feature that's going to be available ahead of the fall release of tvOS.

A new Single Sign-On option for pay TV apps is available in tvOS 10, allowing users to sign in once with their cable credentials to access live cable content available through their cable subscription. Apple plans to introduce a new Remote app for iOS devices that mirrors the layout of the Siri remote, and developers are getting a lot of new APIs to build into their apps.

For the first time, games will be able to require a controller, so more complicated controls will be possible, and there are also APIs for recording and live broadcasting, using HomeKit, and accessing iCloud Photo Library photos.

Other new features in tvOS include a dark mode, a Continuity option for easier text input on the iPhone, automatic app downloads, a "Memories" feature in Photos, and a redesigned Apple Music app.

Not all tvOS features are working in the developer beta now, including Single Sign-On, but Apple will likely add functionality as the beta testing process progresses.

For full details on the new features coming in tvOS 10, make sure to check out our tvOS 10 roundup. Don't miss out on our previous videos, which have covered iOS 10, watchOS 3, and macOS Sierra:

- WWDC 2016 Overview in Seven Minutes
- iOS 10's Overhauled Lockscreen
- The New iOS 10 Photos App
- The New iOS 10 Messages App
- macOS Sierra - Siri
- iOS 10 Hidden Features
- watchOS 3 Overview
- iOS 10's Redesigned Apple Music Experience
- 3D Touch in iOS 10
- The New Home App for Controlling HomeKit Devices

We've also got roundups for all of the upcoming operating systems, including watchOS 3, macOS Sierra, and iOS 10.

Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 10
Buyer's Guide: Apple TV (Neutral)

Apple's New Differential Privacy Feature is Opt-In

When Apple introduced iOS 10, macOS Sierra, watchOS 3, and tvOS 10 at the 2016 Worldwide Developers Conference, it also announced plans to implement a new technology called Differential Privacy, which helps the company gather data and usage patterns for a large number of users without compromising individual security.

At the time, Apple said Differential Privacy would be used in iOS 10 to collect data to improve QuickType and emoji suggestions, Spotlight deep link suggestions, and Lookup Hints in Notes, and said it would be used in macOS Sierra to improve autocorrect suggestions and Lookup Hints.

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There's been a lot of confusion about differential privacy and what it means for end users, leading Recode to write a piece that clarifies many of the details of differential privacy.

First and foremost, as with all of Apple's data collection, there is an option to opt out of sharing data with the company. Differential data collection is entirely opt in and users can decide whether or not to send data to Apple.

Apple will start collecting data starting in iOS 10, and has not been doing so already, and it also will not use the cloud-stored photos of iOS users to bolster image recognition capabilities in the Photos app.
As for what data is being collected, Apple says that differential privacy will initially be limited to four specific use cases: New words that users add to their local dictionaries, emojis typed by the user (so that Apple can suggest emoji replacements), deep links used inside apps (provided they are marked for public indexing) and lookup hints within notes.

Apple will also continue to do a lot of its predictive work on the device, something it started with the proactive features in iOS 9. This work doesn't tap the cloud for analysis, nor is the data shared using differential privacy.
Apple's deep concern for user privacy has put its services like Siri behind competing services from other companies, but Differential Privacy gives the company a way to collect useful data without compromising the security of its customer base.

As Apple's VP of software engineering Craig Federighi explained at the WWDC keynote, Differential privacy uses hashing, subsampling, and noise injection to enable crowd-sourced learning without simultaneously gathering data on individual people.

Related Roundups: iOS 10, macOS Sierra

New Thunderbolt Display With Integrated GPU Still in the Works

Apple yesterday announced plans to discontinue the 5-year-old Thunderbolt Display, leaving it unclear if Apple's display business is coming to an end or if another model is in the works for a future release. According to BuzzFeed's John Paczkowski, Apple isn't done with Thunderbolt displays.

In a tweet shared this morning, Paczkowski said he's heard from unspecified sources that a next-generation display will feature an integrated GPU, a possibility that was first bandied about in early June, ahead of WWDC.


A Thunderbolt Display with a built-in graphics card would be able to work with almost any Mac because it would be driven by an internal graphics card rather than the machine it's connected to.

It's believed Apple has not introduced a 5K display to match the 5K iMac because there are no machines that could run it over a single stream cable, a fact that will remain true even in upcoming machines like a rumored Skylake Retina MacBook Pro.

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Paczkowski doesn't include other details about the display Apple has in the works, but rumors have suggested it will feature a resolution of 5120 x 2880 and it's also likely to include USB-C ports that support Thunderbolt 3.

Stock shortages ahead of the Worldwide Developers Conference led to speculation that Apple could refresh the Thunderbolt Display at the event, but that did not end up happening. There is no word on when Apple might release a new display, but with an integrated GPU, it would not have any specific requirements and could theoretically debut at any time.

If a new Thunderbolt Display is planned for 2016, a logical guess at a release date might be in the fall alongside rumored redesigned Retina MacBook Pros.

Related Roundup: Thunderbolt Display
Buyer's Guide: Displays (Don't Buy)

Apple Watch May Switch to Micro-LED Display in Mid 2017 or Later

Apple-Watch-trioApple may switch to micro-LED displays for the Apple Watch in the second half of 2017 at the earliest, moving away from the current OLED technology used, according to supply chain sources for Taiwanese website DigiTimes.

The timeline suggests that the much-rumored Apple Watch 2 lineup expected to debut in the second half of 2016 will continue to have OLED displays, with the move towards micro-LED panels liking occurring in tandem with the tentatively named Apple Watch 3.

Micro-LED displays can be thinner and lighter and allow for improved color gamut, increased brightness, and higher resolutions. The panels do not require backlighting like traditional LCD displays, but they can be difficult and expensive to mass produce. Micro LEDs range in size from 1-micron to 100-micron.

Earlier this year, KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said the Apple Watch 2 will mainly feature internal improvements, with more significant form factor design changes not occurring until 2017. By then, the switch to micro-LED panels and other technological advances could allow for a thinner Apple Watch.

Apple acquired micro-LED display maker LuxVue Technology in 2014, and one of the company's investors at the time said it had "a technical breakthrough in displays." LuxVue holds multiple micro-LED-related patents and, in 2013, it raised $25.2 million in funding to pursue the technology.

Apple also opened a facility in northern Taiwan last year, where it is believed to be focusing on micro-LED technology.

The current Apple Watch is the only Apple product with an OLED display due to its small size. The company continues to use LCD technology based on a TFT manufacturing process for iPhones, but widespread rumors suggest Apple will release its first OLED-based iPhone as early as September 2017.

Apple Discontinues Thunderbolt Display

Apple today told several news sites that it plans to discontinue its Thunderbolt Display, which has been available for purchase online and in Apple retail stores since it was first introduced in the summer of 2011.

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"We're discontinuing the Apple Thunderbolt Display. It will be available through Apple.com, Apple's retail stores and Apple Authorized Resellers while supplies last. There are a number of great third-party options available for Mac users," said an Apple spokesperson.
Apple will continue to sell existing Thunderbolt Display stock so long as it remains available, but once stock is exhausted, the Thunderbolt Display will no longer be available as production is ceasing. It is not clear why Apple has decided to make an announcement concerning the discontinuation of the display and if it means a new 4K or 5K display is on the horizon.

Stock shortages ahead of WWDC sparked rumors that Apple might be planning to introduce a new display at the event, but no new hardware appeared and Apple instead focused on software for iOS devices, Macs, Apple TVs, and Apple Watch devices.

Rumors have suggested Apple is working on a 5K display, and if true, such a display could feature a resolution of 5120 x 2880 pixels, USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 peripherals, and a design that mimics the latest iMacs. Speculation suggests it could come equipped with a built-in GPU or use a DisplayPort 1.2 Multi-Stream Transport setup to stitch two halves of a display together to make one seamless display.

If a new Thunderbolt Display is in the works, it could launch alongside next-generation Skylake Retina MacBook Pros, which are rumored to be in the works for late fall.

Related Roundup: Thunderbolt Display
Buyer's Guide: Displays (Don't Buy)

Here's the New 'Home' App for Controlling HomeKit Devices in iOS 10

HomeKit users have long wished for a centralized, Apple-designed app for controlling HomeKit-enabled products, and in iOS 10, Apple has granted that wish, with the debut of the new "Home" app. Designed to be used on the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch, Home is Apple's new one-stop HomeKit control solution.

As can be seen in the video below, Home offers a simple, fast, convenient way to manage all of the connected products in your house. Not all accessories are fully functional with Home right now as its a beta, but support will improve before Home launches as part of iOS 10 this fall.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Opening the Home app brings up a main screen that lists all favorite Scenes and favorite accessories for quick access. The app's wallpaper is customizable, and a Settings section offers options for changing the name of a home and inviting additional users. The "Rooms" section of the app is where new accessories can be added and new Scenes can be created, with Scenes able to work with all of the HomeKit-connected products in your house.

Each accessory can also be controlled individually by pressing on its name to bring up a set of options. With Philips Hue lights, for example, a long press or 3D Touch offers options for dimming lights and changing colors.

An "Automation" feature in the Home app allows HomeKit accessories to be set up to perform actions based on time and location, such as turning on the lights when the sun sets or turning on the air conditioning when you leave work. The Apple TV serves as a remote hub for HomeKit and in iOS 10, you can also set an iPad to serve as a hub to enable HomeKit devices to work remotely.

Along with a new Home app, iOS 10 brings support for additional types of HomeKit devices like air conditioners, heaters, air purifiers, humidifiers, cameras, and doorbells.

For full details on the new features coming in iOS 10, make sure to check out our iOS 10 roundup. Don't miss out on our previous videos, which have covered watchOS 3, macOS Sierra, and other iOS 10 features:

- WWDC 2016 Overview in Seven Minutes
- iOS 10's Overhauled Lockscreen
- The New iOS 10 Photos App
- The New iOS 10 Messages App
- macOS Sierra - Siri
- iOS 10 Hidden Features
- watchOS 3 Overview
- iOS 10's Redesigned Apple Music Experience
- 3D Touch in iOS 10

We've also got roundups for all of the upcoming operating systems, including watchOS 3, macOS Sierra, and tvOS 10.

Related Roundup: iOS 10
Tag: HomeKit

Here's What a Headphone Jack to Lightning Adapter Looks Like

With Apple planning to remove the headphone jack in the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus, new iPhone owners are going to be stuck with a whole lot of headphones that don't work with their devices. There is a simple, though awkward, solution -- a Lightning to 3.5mm headphone jack adapter.

Lightning adapters aren't common at this point in time, but as you can see in the video below, we tracked down an adapter from Japanese company Deff to give you an idea of what it'll be like using standard 3.5mm headphones with a device that doesn't have a headphone jack.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Our adapter cost upwards of $70, but we expect to see a greater number of adapters on the market following the launch of the iPhone 7, which will drive prices down quite a bit. It's also likely Apple will develop its own Lightning to 3.5mm jack adapter and we can expect to see that sold for around $20-$30 based on the pricing of other types of adapters.

Apple's choice to remove the headphone jack in the iPhone 7 hasn't been a popular one. The Verge's Nilay Patel has called the move "user-hostile and stupid," while Steve Streza, in support of Patel, said the decision is good for Apple but bad for the consumer.

Others, like John Gruber, aren't bothered by the iPhone 7's lack of a headphone jack. In a rebuttal to Patel's post, Gruber compared the headphone jack to the floppy drive, an argument supported by MG Siegler, who pointed out the fact that there's similar outrage every time Apple retires a feature.
But here's the thing about that notion: it's said every single time Apple does something like this. The removal of the floppy drive on the Mac. The lack of a physical keyboard on the iPhone. The removal of the optical drive on MacBooks. The end of the mouse.The removal of USB ports. Etc. Etc. Etc.

The outrage is as palpable as it is comical. Then everyone calms down. The news cycle moves on. People buy the new Apple device anyway. Life continues. All competitors copy Apple's once-controversial move. And technology ends up in a better place as a result.
Going forward, Apple's decision to drop the headphone jack will likely reshape the headphone market. Companies have already started investing in Lightning-connected headphones like the ones we covered in a recent video, and wireless solutions are also on the rise.


Based on rumors, Apple is planning on selling the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus with EarPods that feature a Lightning connector, so everyone will have a way to listen to music on the devices right when they come out of the box. Apple is also said to be developing premium wireless earphones that could be similar in design to the Bragi Dash.

Related Roundup: iPhone 7

iTunes 12.4 Has Apple Music Playback Bug Related to Tracks Shorter Than 60 Seconds

A new iTunes bug has been discovered that causes Apple Music playback issues related to tracks shorter than 60 seconds. MacRumors was able to reproduce the issue on Macs running OS X 10.11.5 and iTunes 12.4.1.

Specifically, when an Apple Music track that is shorter than 60 seconds is streamed in its entirety, without skipping ahead, the subsequent song in an album or playlist fails to play and appears to be in a state of perpetual buffering.


MacRumors forum member B/D used backend file change monitoring tool fswatch and identified a plausible reason for the bug:
It looks like the way Apple Music handles streaming is when the current song is a minute from the end, iTunes signals the next track in the queue to start downloading so that it's ready to play when the current song is over. However, when the song is less than a minute long the next song's download is never initiated, apparently because some "one minute remaining" event is never triggered! This means the app just sits waiting for a download to finish that has in fact never started.
The bug only affects tracks streamed through Apple Music, with songs and albums that have been stored locally on iTunes unaffected. The issue was unable to be reproduced on a Mac running macOS Sierra beta, or on iTunes 12.3 or earlier, or on an iPhone running iOS 9.3.2.

The bug has been reported to Apple and should hopefully be resolved in a future iTunes software update.

Update: The bug was originally shared on the Apple Support Communities by user ivoisbelongtous.

Apple Pay Holdout Walmart Expands 'Walmart Pay' to 15 More States

Walmart has announced that its mobile payments solution Walmart Pay is now available in fifteen additional U.S. states, including Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

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Walmart Pay is built into the Walmart app [Direct Link] for iOS and Android and works at any checkout lane with any major credit, debit, pre-paid, or Walmart gift card.

The payments solution is based upon a QR code checkout process that involves opening the Walmart app, selecting Walmart Pay, activating the camera, scanning the code displayed at the register, and waiting for the cashier to finish bagging your items. An electronic receipt is automatically sent to the app.


Walmart Pay's widespread adoption at some 1,500 stores in fifteen more states, following statewide launches in Arkansas and Texas last month, further suggests that Walmart will not be adopting Apple Pay for at least the foreseeable future. Walmart Pay's nationwide rollout is expected to be completed in 2016.

The word in late 2015 from Walmart senior vice president of services Daniel Eckert was that Walmart Pay allows "for integration of other mobile wallets in the future," providing at least some hope that the retailer may eventually accept rival payment services such as Apple Pay, Android Pay, and Samsung Pay at its stores.

Walmart is among a handful of retailers that have refused to support Apple Pay since its American launch in October 2014. The retailer was originally committed to the Merchant Customer Exchange (MCX) consortium and its now indefinitely postponed payments service CurrentC before launching Walmart Pay.

Walmart's resistance to Apple Pay persists even as other former holdouts such as Best Buy and Rite Aid have reversed course and begun accepting the iPhone-based payments service at their U.S. stores. Walmart rival Target, meanwhile, is developing a QR code-based mobile wallet solution of its own.

The Walmart app [Direct Link] is free on the App Store for iPhone and Apple Watch.

Related Roundup: Apple Pay
Tags: Walmart Pay, Walmart

Apple Confirms Unencrypted Kernel in iOS 10 Beta is Intentional

Yesterday it was discovered that iOS 10 does not feature an encrypted kernel, allowing users and researchers access to the core of the operating system and its inner workings. It was unclear at the time whether the lack of encryption was an accident or intentional, but today Apple confirmed to TechCrunch that the company did not encrypt the kernel for a reason.

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“The kernel cache doesn’t contain any user info, and by unencrypting it we’re able to optimize the operating system’s performance without compromising security,” an Apple spokesperson told TechCrunch.
The kernel, which dictates how software can use hardware and keeps the device secure, is unencrypted so that developers and researchers can "poke around" and find potential security flaws. Because the kernel is easier to access and flaws may be easier to find, Apple can more easily and more quickly patch potential issues.

The move is a shift for Apple, who had encrypted the kernel in past versions of iOS, leaving developers and researchers out of the loop on the inner workings of the operating system. As noted by security expert Jonathan Zdziarski, it's likely that Apple has made this shift to prevent groups from "hoarding" vulnerabilities in Apple's software, like the vulnerability used by the FBI to break into the iPhone 5c of the San Bernardino shooter.

Related Roundup: iOS 10

3D Touch in iOS 10: Respond to Notifications, Share Apps, Adjust Control Center Settings and More

In iOS 10, Apple has focused heavily on making 3D Touch more useful and relevant, so if you have an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus, there are a whole slew of new gestures you can use on the Lock screen, the Home screen, and in certain apps.

Given the expansive new 3D Touch options in iOS 10, we've created a video that shows you everything you can do with one of Apple's newest iPhones. With Apple introducing so many new 3D Touch capabilities, we can expect 3D Touch to be a feature that will show up in all of Apple's future devices, from iPhones to iPads.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Incoming notifications now support 3D Touch Peek and Pop capabilities, allowing users to do things like view photos and videos and respond to incoming messages all without leaving the Lock screen. In the Notification Center itself, there's now an option to use a 3D Touch press to clear all of the notifications for the day.

When downloading an app, you can press on it to pause or cancel the download, and when 3D Touching on any app, there are new options for bringing up the share sheet. Apps that have accompanying widgets, like Weather, will display that widget when using a Quick Action press on the Home screen.

Pressing on a folder now brings up an option for quickly renaming it, and if there are apps with Notification badges inside of a folder, you can easily access them using 3D Touch.

In the Control Center, there are 3D Touch shortcuts for the Flashlight (change intensity), Timer (pre-set intervals), Calculator (copy last result), and Camera (picture options), while Apple Music offers more info when 3D Touching on a song that's playing and Messages brings up Bubble Effects when using a 3D Touch to customize chat bubbles.

For full details on the new features coming in iOS 10, make sure to check out our iOS 10 roundup. Don't miss out on our previous videos, which have covered watchOS 3, macOS Sierra, and other iOS 10 features:

- WWDC 2016 Overview in Seven Minutes
- iOS 10's Overhauled Lockscreen
- The New iOS 10 Photos App
- The New iOS 10 Messages App
- macOS Sierra - Siri
- iOS 10 Hidden Features
- watchOS 3 Overview
- iOS 10's Redesigned Apple Music Experience

We've also got roundups for all of the upcoming operating systems, including watchOS 3, macOS Sierra, and tvOS 10.

Related Roundup: iOS 10