Apple last week launched an updated version of the 13-inch MacBook Pro, and it is the first Mac that is equipped with an updated M2 chip. As it's using a brand new chip, we thought we'd pick up the ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro and compare it to the prior-generation M1 MacBook Pro to see just what's new.


For the video comparison, we're using the entry-level 13-inch ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro with 8GB unified memory and a 256GB SSD, and comparing it to the entry-level 13-inch ‌M1‌ MacBook Pro with 8GB unified memory and a 256GB SSD, so this is a direct comparison between the new machine and its predecessor.

Design wise, there are no differences because Apple kept the chassis and the internal components the same, with the update limited to the internal chips. The bezels are the same, the MacBook Pro still has a Touch Bar, and it continues to use USB-C with no MagSafe port.

The ‌M2‌ chip in the MacBook Pro features an 8-core CPU, a 10-core GPU, and support for up to 24GB unified memory, while the ‌M1‌ included an 8-core CPU, an 8-core GPU, and up to 16GB unified memory. As a side note, while the base machine ships with 8GB, it's almost always a good idea to go up to at least 16GB for improved performance.

When it comes to CPU performance, the ‌M2‌ beats out the ‌M1‌. Though there's still an 8-core CPU, single-core Geekbench speeds clock in at up to 12 percent faster than the ‌M1‌, while multi-core scores can be up to 20 percent higher. In our own testing, we saw more varied results with an eight percent improvement in single-core performance and a 12 percent improvement in multi-core performance.

As for GPU performance, the ‌M2‌ is much faster than the ‌M1‌ because it has two additional cores. Geekbench Metal scores were 35 percent better with the ‌M2‌, and 3DMARK frame rate benchmarks saw the ‌M2‌ earning 40fps while the ‌M1‌ earned 29fps.

In real-world usage, video export times were about the same for a basic timeline, with improvements on the ‌M2‌ when adding more effects and plugins.

There has been some controversy over the 256GB SSD in the MacBook Pro, which has been seeing slower speeds on Blackmagic disk speed tests. Apple used a single 256GB NAND flash storage chip for the ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro, while the ‌M1‌ model had two NAND chips likely at 128GB each. Multiple NAND chips allow for faster speeds in parallel, which means the ‌M1‌ MacBook Pro's 256GB SSD is notably outperforming the ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro's 256GB SSD. Note that this is an issue limited to the 256GB models, as the 512GB models are not exhibiting the same problem.

On machines with just 8GB memory, the SSD is engaged for virtual memory when needed, and a slow SSD can mean slow overall performance speeds, which is something to be aware of. We did some real-world tests transferring large files and did see faster speeds on the ‌M2‌, but other performance testing by YouTube channels like Max Tech have had different results and have seen performance hits on the ‌M2‌ compared to the ‌M1‌.

To avoid potentially disappointing performance, it's probably best to upgrade the SSD to 512GB if you're going to get the ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro, and picking up more memory is also a good idea because it can't be upgraded later. With the base model the subject of controversy, those considering the machine may also want to simply wait for the ‌M2‌ MacBook Air, set to launch in July.

For our full comparison of the ‌M1‌ MacBook Pro and the ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro, make sure to watch our video up above. Have an ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Related Roundup: 13" MacBook Pro
Related Forum: MacBook Pro

Though code in iOS 16 has indicated that the iPad won't work as a home hub following the update, an Apple spokesperson today told The Verge that the ‌iPad‌ will indeed still be able to be used as a home hub, but with a caveat - it will not support new architecture that is being introduced later this year.

home app ios 16
The spokesperson said that Apple is planning to "introduce a new architecture," which could be referring to Matter, a new smart home standard that will allow for better interoperability between smart home devices from different companies and manufacturers. Apple is expected to introduce Matter support later this year.

iOS 16 and iPadOS 16 will continue to support iPad as a home hub with no loss in functionality. Alongside these releases, the Home app will introduce a new architecture for an even more efficient and reliable experience. Because iPad will not be supported as a home hub with the new architecture, users who rely on iPad for that purpose do not need to update the Home architecture and can continue enjoying all existing features.

Those who use an ‌iPad‌ for their smart home setups will need to avoid updating to the new architecture, which will be available as an upgrade in the Home app's settings in an update to ‌iOS 16‌ and iPadOS 16. Customers who want to continue using an ‌iPad‌ will need to avoid this future update, which sounds like it is coming in an iOS 16.1 or iOS 16.2 software release.

Apple has already made it clear that iPads will not be compatible with Matter, as the ‌iOS 16‌ preview page states that Matter accessories rely on an Apple TV 4K or HomePod as a home hub, with no mention of the ‌iPad‌. So in conclusion, for the time being, the ‌iPad‌ can be used as a home hub, but things are likely to change later this year with future ‌iOS 16‌ updates.

The ‌Apple TV‌ 4K, ‌Apple TV‌ HD, HomePod, and HomePod mini will all work as home hubs with the new architecture that Apple has in the works.

Related Roundups: iOS 16, iPadOS 16

Belkin today announced the launch of an upgraded Boostcharge Pro 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Stand that's designed for the iPhone, Apple Watch, and AirPods. Compared to the prior-generation model, the new 3-in-1 charger features fast charging support for the Apple Watch Series 7.

belkin wireless charger
The upgraded Apple Watch charging puck is able to charge an ‌Apple Watch Series 7‌ from 0 to 80 percent in approximately 45 minutes, which is the same charging speed as the charging puck that ships with the Series 7 models. Faster charging is a Series 7 exclusive feature, with older Apple Watch models charging at standard speeds.

The included MagSafe charging puck is able to charge Apple's ‌MagSafe‌ iPhones at up to 15W as it is using the same ‌MagSafe‌ charging technology as Apple's own ‌MagSafe‌ chargers. Along with Apple Watch and ‌iPhone‌ chargers, the Belkin 3-in-1 charger also has a 5W charing space for the AirPods Pro and AirPods with Wireless Charging Case.

Belkin is including a 40W power adapter with the Boostcharge Pro 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Stand, and it can be pre-ordered from the Belkin website as of today for $150. Apple retail stores will begin carrying the charger starting in June.

Tag: Belkin

Apple today seeded the fourth betas of upcoming iOS 15.6 and iPadOS 15.6 updates to developers for testing purposes, with the new software coming two weeks after the release of the third betas.

iOS 15
Developers can download iOS 15.6 and iPadOS 15.6 through the Apple Developer Center or over the air after the proper profile has been installed on an iPhone or iPad.

We don't yet know what might be introduced in iOS 15.6 and iPadOS 15.6, as Apple has now implemented all of the features that were announced as coming in the iOS and iPadOS 15 updates, and work on iOS 15 is likely winding down with iOS 16 approaching.

There were no new features discovered in the first three betas of iOS 15.6 and iPadOS 15.6, suggesting these are updates focusing on bug fixes and other under-the-hood improvements.

iOS 15.6 and iPadOS 15.6 could be some of the last updates to ‌iOS 15‌ and ‌iPadOS 15‌ as Apple is now working on ‌iOS 16‌, which is set to be released this fall.

Apple has also seeded new developer betas of tvOS 15.6 and watchOS 8.7.

Related Roundups: iOS 15, iPadOS 15
Related Forum: iOS 15

For the last several years, Apple has been working to develop its own 5G modem chip so that it won't need to rely on Qualcomm as a supplier, but according to Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, Apple's efforts "may have failed."

Apple 5G Modem Feature Triad
Kuo says that his "latest survey" suggests that development on the chip has stalled, which means Qualcomm would remain the exclusive supplier for 5G chips for the 2023 iPhone models. Previously, Kuo believed that Apple's 2023 iPhones would use modem chips designed in-house rather than Qualcomm chips.


Qualcomm is now expected to supply 100 percent of chips for the 2023 ‌iPhone‌ models, rather than just 20 percent. Kuo expects that Apple will continue to develop its own 5G chips, but it will take more time for the work to be completed and satisfactory for use in iPhones and other devices.

It is not clear why Apple will not be able to have its modem chips ready in time for the 2023 ‌iPhone‌ launch, but the company has been aiming to get away from Qualcomm for years now. Apple had a protracted legal battle with Qualcomm and planned to use Intel 5G chips in the 2020 iPhones, but that ultimately was not possible as Intel was not able to manufacture 5G chips that met Apple's standards.

Apple ended up settling its lawsuit with Qualcomm in 2019, and since then, has used Qualcomm 5G modems in the ‌iPhone‌ and iPad lineups. Since then, Apple has been developing its own modem chip, and it even purchased Intel's modem chip business to get a head start, and rumors suggested Apple was on track for a 2023 launch. Last year, Qualcomm even said that it expected to supply just 20 percent of the modem chips used in iPhones in 2023, but it sounds like Qualcomm may be producing chips for Apple for at least another two ‌iPhone‌ generations.

The Wall Street Journal's Joanna Stern today shared a new documentary about the evolution of the iPhone ahead of the 15th anniversary of the device launching on June 29, 2007. The documentary includes an interview with Apple's marketing chief Greg Joswiak, iPhone co-creator Tony Fadell, and a family of iPhone users.

iPhone vs Galaxy Larger
One segment of the interview reflects on Android smartphones gaining larger displays years before the iPhone did. When asked about how much of a factor Samsung and other Android smartphone makers had on Apple at the time, Joswiak admitted they were "annoying" and accused them of poorly copying Apple's technology.

"They were annoying," said Joswiak. "And they were annoying because, as you know, they ripped off our technology. They took the innovations that we had created and created a poor copy of it, and just put a bigger screen around it. So, yeah, we were none too pleased."

Samsung launched the Galaxy S4 with a 5-inch display in early 2013, at a time when the iPhone 5 had a 4-inch display. Apple did eventually release its first larger smartphones with the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus in 2014, and the devices were met with strong demand and went on to be among the best-selling iPhone models ever.

Apple sued Samsung in 2011 for patent infringement, alleging that Samsung copied the iPhone's design with its own Galaxy line of smartphones. Apple was initially awarded around $1 billion in damages, but the amount was lowered in a subsequent retrial. In 2018, Apple finally settled with Samsung and reiterated the following statement:

We believe deeply in the value of design, and our teams work tirelessly to create innovative products that delight our customers. This case has always been about more than money. Apple ignited the smartphone revolution with iPhone and it is a fact that Samsung blatantly copied our design. It is important that we continue to protect the hard work and innovation of so many people at Apple.

We're grateful to the jury for their service and pleased they agree that Samsung should pay for copying our products.

The full documentary can be watched on The Wall Street Journal's website and provides an interesting look back at the iPhone over the years.

Foxconn has commenced its annual seasonal hiring spree in preparation for iPhone 14 production, according to the South China Morning Post.

Beyond iPhone 13 Feature 2
The report claims that Foxconn is offering a 9,000 yuan bonus (around $1,300) to new assembly line workers who stay on the job for more than four months after being hired at its factory in Zhengzhou, China. Foxconn offers similar bonuses to new and returning workers each year in the months leading up to a new iPhone launch.

Yesterday it was reported that Apple suppliers have begun shipping iPhone 14 components to manufacturers like Foxconn for final assembly.

Apple is expected to announce the iPhone 14 lineup in September like usual, with rumors suggesting there will be a 6.1-inch iPhone 14, 6.7-inch iPhone 14 Max, 6.1-inch iPhone 14 Pro, and 6.7-inch iPhone 14 Pro Max. The two Pro models are expected to get many new features, while fewer changes are expected for the two lower-priced models.

Key new features rumored for the iPhone 14 Pro models include a new pill-shaped cutout and hole housing Face ID sensors and the front camera, a faster A16 chip, an upgraded 48-megapixel rear camera lens with support for 8K video recording, and an always-on display that shows the time, date, and iOS 16's new Lock screen widgets.

Improvements across the iPhone 14 lineup could include an upgraded front camera with autofocus, longer battery life, and Wi-Fi 6E support.

Related Roundups: iPhone 14, iPhone 14 Pro
Tag: Foxconn

Over a year has passed since the second-generation Apple TV 4K launched in May 2021, and rumors have started to surface about new features planned for the next model and beyond, including a faster chip, increased RAM, a new Siri Remote, and more.

apple tv 4k arcade feature
We've recapped all of the Apple TV rumors that have been shared below, as well as features coming in the tvOS 16 software update later this year.

A14 Chip and 4GB of RAM

A new Apple TV codenamed "J255" is in development with an A14 chip and 4GB of RAM, according to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman. These upgrades would result in improved performance, which could be beneficial for gaming on the device.

The current Apple TV 4K has an A12 chip and 3GB of RAM.

Lower Price

Apple plans to launch a lower-priced Apple TV in the second half of 2022, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. It's unclear if this Apple TV would have the A14 chip and 4GB of RAM that Gurman reported, or if it would be an entirely different model.

The current Apple TV 4K starts at $179 with 32GB of storage, while the Apple TV HD remains available for $149. By comparison, there are many streaming sticks from brands like Chromecast and Roku available for under $50 to $100.

Both the second-generation (2010) and third-generation (2012) models of the Apple TV were priced at $99 at launch, and Apple eventually lowered the price of the third-generation model to $69, so there is precedence for a lower-priced Apple TV.

New Siri Remote

In the iOS 16 beta, there are code-level references to what appears to be a new and unreleased version of the Siri Remote for the Apple TV.

As spotted by @aaronp613, there are strings for "SiriRemote4" and "WirelessRemoteFirmware.4" that do not correspond with any existing Siri Remote.

siri remote 1
Aaron said the original Siri Remote is identified as "SiriRemote," while a revised version of that remote with a white circle around the "Menu" button is "SiriRemote2," and the silver Siri Remote released last year is "SiriRemote3." This leads to the possibility that "SiriRemote4" is an upcoming remote for a new or existing Apple TV.

No additional details about "SiriRemote4" are mentioned in the code, so nothing is known about the remote's potential design or features at this time. The code findings also do not guarantee that Apple will move forward with releasing a new remote.

HomePod Combo

Gurman believes that Apple will eventually release a device that combines an Apple TV, HomePod, and FaceTime camera, but details remain slim. Gurman said the combined device "will probably be at the center of Apple's approach" in the home.

tvOS 16 Features

tvOS 16 will be released for the Apple TV HD and newer later this year. The update is currently in beta for developers, with a public beta to follow in July.

An overview of new tvOS 16 features for the Apple TV:

  • Cross-device connectivity: Apple says tvOS 16 enables developers to integrate their Apple TV app with their iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch apps to unlock new experiences that "feel more personal than ever." For example, developers can deliver more personalized workouts on the Apple TV based on motion sensor data from the Apple Watch, display real-time information on the iPhone while a video plays in their Apple TV app, or include more screens for gameplay.
  • Expanded game controller support: Apple says many additional Bluetooth game controllers are supported on tvOS 16. Notably, this includes support for Nintendo's Joy-Cons and Pro Controller.
  • Multiuser improvements: tvOS 16 offers improved system integration for user profiles in Apple TV apps. Apple says with credentials stored in a shared keychain, users won't need to sign in and choose their profile every time they launch an Apple TV app that has been updated with this functionality.
  • Matter support: Matter is a new standard that will enable compatible smart home accessories to work together seamlessly across multiple platforms, including Apple's HomeKit, Amazon's Alexa, and more. A home hub is needed to control Matter accessories in the Home app, which can be an Apple TV updated to tvOS 16 or a HomePod/HomePod mini updated to the latest software version.
Related Roundup: Apple TV
Buyer's Guide: Apple TV (Neutral)

Apple has won a patent for a dual monitor stand that appears to be based on the "Pro Stand" design option for the Studio Display and Pro Display XDR.

dual pro stand patent 1
The patent filing first surfaced in 2020, but now the United States Patent and Trademark Office has officially granted Apple the patent. The granted patent, spotted by Patently Apple, is simply titled "Dual Display Stand," and details a mechanical design that seeks to address the shortcomings of existing multi-display solutions, offering easy and precise adjustment for up to two external displays.

The filing outlines a large display stand with two spaced-apart legs, connected by a horizontal support bar that allows two displays to be mounted. The stand allows for a high level of precise adjustment and control, with vertical, horizontal, and center pivot degrees of freedom. Apple offers a brief description of the improvements offered by the stand in the patent:

The display stand provides improved smoothness, rigidity, and comfort for the user to support and use multiple displays on a single stand.

dual pro stand patent 2
The stand seems to use the same moveable joints as the existing Pro Stand for the Studio Display and Pro Display XDR, but places them on rail shuttles for horizontal adjustment. A central joint on the support bar allows the stand to adjust the angle between the displays.

dual pro stand patent 3
The stand has handles on each side that can be twisted to easily adjust the height of the support bar for exact vertical adjustment. The patent notes that the entire bar is lifted regardless of the angle of the support bar or which handle is turned.

The patent also stresses that the shuttles on the continuous rail provide "smooth, consistent contact" with the rails despite adjustments to the support bar using wheels.

dual pro stand patent 4
The filing explains why the Dual Display Stand solution may be better than existing third-party stand solutions such as independently-movable VESA-mount arms:

When users use multiple displays in a workspace, the displays are generally supported by multiple different individual stands or by independently-movable arms that extend from a single support point. These individual stands or arms unnecessarily take up large spaces, are often aesthetically unpleasing, overcomplicated, and have inefficient redundant mechanisms. When multiple displays are used on independent arms, they can be difficult to align in a smooth and precise way due to inconsistent counterbalancing and arm lengths. When multiple displays are used on a single support, they cannot be effectively adjusted relative to each other about a vertical axis.

When it first emerged in 2020, it was striking how far developed the patent filing was, effectively outlining an entire product. Normally, Apple's patent filings focus on a specific part of a device or system, and while the dual display stand's mechanical operations are all able to come under a single filing, there are very clear similarities to the existing Pro Stand alongside a pronounced level of detail for a hitherto unknown Apple accessory.

Given this level of completeness, it is possible that Apple may be planning to bring the Dual Display Stand to customers at some point in the future. There is also a chance it may be reserved for internal corporate use or simply for retail store display units. That being said, patent filings only reliably show what Apple is researching and developing, and many aspects detailed in its patents never materially emerge.

It is worth noting that while the Pro Display XDR's stand is interchangeable thanks to a magnetic mounting system, the Studio Display's stand is not and it must be configured with the preferred stand upon purchase. This means that any new dual display stand for the Studio Display would similarly have to be configurable at the point of purchase, with different options available for the Studio Display and Pro Display XDR. It is also possible that by the time any such accessory would be available, future iterations of the Studio Display and Pro Display XDR could feature improved mounting systems.

Apple's Pro Stand for the Pro Display XDR, sold separately from the display itself, caused controversy when it was announced in June 2019 for its $999 price tag. In March this year, Apple brought the same height- and tilt-adjustable stand design to the Studio Display with a $400 add-on option. At minimum, the patent suggests that Apple's work on new mechanical display stands is ongoing.

Tag: Patent
Related Forum: Mac Accessories

A sketchy rumor suggesting Apple will release an iPad mini with 120Hz ProMotion was revived today in the Asian media, but a well-connected display industry analyst has already reacted to the reports with skepticism.

ipad mini 9
Responding on Twitter to a question from The Mac Observer's Jeff Butts about the rumor, Display Supply Chain Consultants (DSCC) analyst Ross Young said he would be "surprised" if it was accurate, given that the LCD panel that Apple uses for the ‌iPad mini‌ isn't compatible with ProMotion.

Apple currently uses a-Si LCD backplane technology for ‌iPad mini‌ 6 screens. A-si, or amorphous silicon, is the go-to display tech in the display market for its low cost and relatively simple production process.

By contrast, Apple's iPad Pro models use Oxide LCD panels, notes Young. Oxide LCD technologies, one of the most popular being "IGZO," are preferred in the premium smartphone industry for their ability to provide higher contrasts, refresh rates, and resolutions.


Suggestions that Apple could conceivably adopt ProMotion for a next-generation ‌iPad mini‌ began to receive attention shortly after the "jelly scrolling" phenomenon was identified. The term refers to the slanted/wobbly text effect that some users see when scrolling through text on the ‌iPad mini‌ 6 in portrait mode.

Since LCD screens refresh line by line, there is a tiny delay between when the lines at the top and lines at the bottom are refreshed. While this is normal behavior for LCD screens, it can appear more obvious when observed on the ‌‌iPad mini‌‌.

This isn't the first time we've heard rumors of an ‌iPad mini‌ with ProMotion. The claim first appeared in Korean forums in November, with claims Apple is testing a Samsung-supplied display for a future ‌‌iPad mini‌‌. The latest revival of the 120Hz ‌iPad mini‌ rumor appears to lead back to LeaksApplePro, who has no track record for accurate Apple leaks or rumors.

Related Roundup: iPad mini
Buyer's Guide: iPad Mini (Neutral)
Related Forum: iPad

Benchmark testing has indicated that the 256GB variant of the 13-inch MacBook Pro with M2 chip offers slower SSD performance than its M1 equivalent, and now real-world stress testing by YouTuber Max Yuryev of Max Tech suggests that the 256GB SSD in the 13-inch MacBook Pro is also underperforming in day-to day-usage.


The ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro with 256GB SSD and 8GB RAM was slower than the ‌M1‌ MacBook Pro with 256GB SSD and 8GB RAM across multiple usage tests involving Photoshop, Lightroom, Final Cut Pro, multitasking, and file transfers. In a multitasking RAM test, the ‌M1‌ consistently loads content faster with multiple apps open, and in a 50 image export test in Lightroom with apps open, the ‌M1‌ was again quicker. It was able to export 50 images in 3 minutes and 36 seconds, while the ‌M2‌ took 4 minutes and 12 seconds.

In these tests, the built-in 8GB unified memory of the MacBook Pro is being used by various processes, with the machine using the SSD for virtual memory. The virtual memory swapping results in slower system performance overall.

These results were consistent across all of the performance stress tests done by Max Tech, and benchmark tests conducted by Max Tech on Saturday demonstrated the same discrepancy. The ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro's read speeds appear to be around 50 percent slower, while the write speeds appear to be around 30 percent slower.

  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (‌M1‌/256GB) Read Speed: 2,900
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (‌M2‌/256GB) Read Speed: 1,446
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (‌M1‌/256GB) Write Speed: 2,215
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (‌M2‌/256GB) Write Speed: 1,463

Max Tech attributes this performance difference to Apple's choice of NAND flash storage. In the ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro, there is a single 256GB NAND flash storage chip, while the ‌M1‌ MacBook Pro has two NAND chips that are likely 128GB each. Multiple NAND chips allow for faster speeds in parallel, which could account for the ‌M2‌'s seemingly disappointing performance.

Slower SSD performance appears to be limited to the 256GB version of the 13-inch MacBook Pro, as higher capacity machines have not demonstrated the same issue. Potential MacBook Pro buyers should be aware of this performance problem as it could impact purchase choice.

It is not clear why Apple opted for a different NAND chip setup in the ‌M2‌ MacBook Pro, and further testing is required to determine just what is going on. Apple has not responded to our requests for comment as of yet, but we will update this article if we hear back.

Related Roundup: 13" MacBook Pro
Related Forum: MacBook Pro

Apple today shared a tutorial video designed to walk users through using the free Keynote app to create an animated mantra collage on the iPad. Apple collaborated with artist Quentin Jones on the six minute video, which is part of a "Creative Projects" series.


The tutorial covers gathering inspiration and photos, writing a mantra, using Split View, cutting out photos with the shapes tool, using Instant Alpha to remove negative space, adding words and embellishments with Apple Pencil, creating a dynamic GIF, and more.

To follow along with the tutorial, users will need an ‌iPad‌, the Keynote app, and an ‌Apple Pencil‌, though the ‌Apple Pencil‌ is optional.

With many customers choosing to upgrade their iPhone every two or three years nowadays, there are lots of iPhone 11 Pro users who might be interested in upgrading to the iPhone 14 Pro later this year. Those people are in for a treat, as three years of iPhone generations equals a long list of new features and changes to look forward to.

iPhone 11 Pro vs iPhone 14 Pro
Below, we've put together a list of new features and changes to expect if you upgrade from an iPhone 11 Pro to an iPhone 14 Pro. The list includes features added to the iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro over the last few years, as well as features rumored for the iPhone 14 Pro, which Apple is expected to announce in September as usual.

  • A16 chip vs. A13 chip: The A15 chip in the iPhone 13 Pro is already up to 42% faster than the A13 chip in the 11 Pro, according to Geekbench 5, and performance should improve even more with the A16 chip in the iPhone 14 Pro.
  • Larger display: iPhone 11 Pro is equipped with a 5.8-inch display, while the 14 Pro is expected to have a 6.1-inch display.
  • Brighter display: Compared to the iPhone 11 Pro, the 14 Pro's display should have up to 200 nits higher peak brightness.
  • No more notch: Rumors suggest Apple will replace the notch with a pill-shaped cutout and a hole for the Face ID sensors and front camera on the iPhone 14 Pro.
  • ProMotion: Introduced on the iPhone 13 Pro, ProMotion allows for a variable refresh rate up to 120Hz for smoother appearing content and scrolling.
  • Always-on display: Rumors suggest the iPhone 14 Pro will feature an always-on display mode that shows the time, date, and iOS 16's new Lock screen widgets.
  • Ceramic Shield: Introduced on the iPhone 12 Pro, Apple said the Ceramic Shield front cover increased drop performance by 4x compared to the 11 Pro.
  • Longer battery life: Already, the iPhone 13 Pro gets 22 hours of video playback vs. 18 hours for the 11 Pro, and rumors suggest that iPhone 14 Pro models could feature even larger battery capacities.
  • Numerous camera improvements: iPhone 11 Pro users upgrading to the 14 Pro will get a slew of camera upgrades, including a rumored 48-megapixel Wide lens with support for 8K video recording, an upgraded front camera with autofocus, increased optical zoom, sensor-shift image stabilization, Macro mode, Cinematic mode, ProRAW, ProRes, Night mode portraits and time lapses, and more.
  • Flat edges: While the iPhone 11 Pro's stainless steel frame has round edges, Apple has switched to flat edges with the 12 Pro and newer.
  • 5G: While the iPhone 11 Pro is limited to LTE, the iPhone 12 and newer support 5G for faster cellular data speeds, where available.
  • Wi-Fi 6E: iPhone 14 models are rumored to support Wi-Fi 6E, which extends Wi-Fi into the 6 GHz band, in addition to the existing 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands.
  • MagSafe: iPhone 12 and newer models feature MagSafe, a system that lets you magnetically attach accessories to the back of the iPhone, such as Apple's own MagSafe Charger, MagSafe Wallet, and MagSafe Battery Pack.
  • Increased storage: iPhone 11 Pro started with 64GB of storage, but the 14 Pro should have at least 128GB of base storage.
  • LiDAR Scanner: Introduced on the iPhone 12 Pro, the LiDAR Scanner is situated next to the rear camera and offers faster augmented reality experiences and improves autofocus by 6x in low-light photos and videos, according to Apple.
  • Improved water resistance: Apple says the iPhone 11 Pro is water resistant up to a depth of four meters for up to 30 minutes, while the 12 Pro and newer are water resistant up to a depth of six meters for up to 30 minutes.

Given the vast number of improvements and changes since the iPhone 11 Pro, this list is far from comprehensive, but it does highlight most major features.

Related Roundup: iPhone 14 Pro

Apple suppliers have begun shipping components for iPhone 14 models, which are expected to launch in September as usual, according to Taiwanese industry publication DigiTimes. The report likely refers to components being shipped to manufacturers like Foxconn for final assembly of iPhone 14 models over the next few months.

iPhone 14 Pro Lineup Feature Purple
"Component suppliers have kicked off recently their shipments for the next-generation iPhone series slated for launch later this year," the report said.

Rumors suggest big changes are coming to the iPhone 14 Pro models in particular, with the notch expected to be replaced by a new pill-shaped cutout and hole housing Face ID sensors and the front camera. The new Pro models are also expected to feature a faster A16 chip and an upgraded 48-megapixel rear camera lens with support for 8K video recording, while standard iPhone 14 models are said to retain the A15 chip and a 12-megapixel lens.

Another headline feature rumored for iPhone 14 Pro models is an always-on display that integrates with iOS 16's new Lock screen widgets.

The full lineup is expected to consist of the 6.1-inch iPhone 14, 6.7-inch iPhone 14 Max, 6.1-inch iPhone 14 Pro, and 6.7-inch iPhone 14 Pro Max, with the 5.4-inch mini model set to be discontinued. Improvements to the standard iPhone 14 models could include increased RAM, an upgraded front camera with autofocus, and Wi-Fi 6E support.

Last year, all four iPhone 13 models were announced on September 14, became available to pre-order on September 17, and launched on September 24 in the United States and more than 30 other countries. High-end iPhones have been announced in September every year for over a decade now, with the exception of 2020, when the iPhone 12 lineup was unveiled in October of that year, likely due to pandemic-related delays.

Related Roundups: iPhone 14, iPhone 14 Pro

TSMC will manufacture Apple's upcoming "M2 Pro" and "M3" chips based on its 3nm process, according to Taiwanese industry publication DigiTimes.

M2 Pro and Max Feature
"Apple reportedly has booked TSMC capacity for its upcoming 3nm M3 and M2 Pro processors," said DigiTimes, in a report focused on competition between chipmakers like TSMC and Samsung to secure 3nm chip orders. As expected, the report said TSMC will begin volume production of 3nm chips in the second half of 2022.

In his latest newsletter, Bloomberg's Mark Gurman said he expects the M2 Pro to be used in the 14-inch MacBook Pro, 16-inch MacBook Pro, and a high-end Mac mini. As for the M3, Gurman expects the chip to be used in an updated 13-inch MacBook Air, an all-new 15-inch MacBook Air, a new iMac, and potentially a new 12-inch MacBook.

In all likelihood, the M2 Max would also be manufactured based on a 3nm process in this scenario. That chip would be suitable for the highest-end MacBook Pro configurations, and the Mac Studio if Apple chooses to update that computer within the next year or so.

While it was widely expected that the M3 would be 3nm, it is more notable that the M2 Pro might be as well, given that the standard M2 chip that debuted in the new MacBook Air and 13-inch MacBook Pro remains built based on TSMC's 5nm process. Both the M1 and M1 Pro chips share the same process, so the M2 and M2 Pro being built on different processes would represent a change of course for Apple silicon in the Mac.

Vadim Yuryev, host of the YouTube channel Max Tech, has adamantly expressed his opinion that the M2 Pro will indeed be 3nm in a series of tweets over the last few weeks. In the past, Yuryev accurately revealed that the M1 Ultra chip in the Mac Studio would effectively be two M1 Max chips connected as a singular chip.

If the 3nm report is accurate, the performance delta between the M2 Pro and M2 could be even greater than between the M1 Pro and M1. However, it's worth tempering expectations until any additional reports corroborate the M2 Pro chip being 3nm.

Polish developer Michał Gapiński has released a new and improved version of his "Tesla Android Project" which brings Apple's CarPlay experience to more Tesla vehicles than ever before.

tesla carplay hack
According to Gapiński, version 2022.25.1 provides "100% functional ‌CarPlay‌ integration for any Tesla," and comes with several new features and bug fixes.

The project now supports DRM video playback so that apps like Netflix function normally, an orientation lock so that apps like Apple Music automatically launch in landscape mode, and the hack now uses Android 12.1 for better stability and performance.

Gapiński's CarPlay workaround involves using a Rasberry Pi with an LTE modem and a Wi-Fi access point, running a custom Android-based firmware, as well as a micro-HDMI to HDMI cable and Ethernet cable.

The in-car browser is used to connect to the Rasberry Pi and display the ‌‌‌CarPlay‌‌‌ interface on the Tesla's screen, where Apple apps including Maps and ‌‌Apple Music‌‌ function as expected. The system works while driving, and can also be controlled with the media buttons on the Tesla's steering wheel.


Despite the preponderance of ‌‌CarPlay‌‌ on many electric cars, Tesla does not offer official support. Hints in 2020 that Tesla was planning to support Apple Music never came to fruition, and Tesla CEO Elon Musk doesn't respond to requests on Twitter for the company to bring ‌‌CarPlay‌‌ to its vehicles, despite it being one of the most-requested features among Tesla owners.

At the Worldwide Developers Conference 2022, Apple previewed the "next generation" of ‌CarPlay‌ for compatible vehicles. The next-gen ‌CarPlay‌ experience will support multiple displays within a vehicle, offer built-in climate controls for adjusting the temperature of the A/C or heat within the ‌CarPlay‌ interface, and more.

Apple said the first vehicles to support the new ‌CarPlay‌ experience will be announced in late 2023, with committed automakers including Ford, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Infiniti, Honda, Acura, Jaguar, Land Rover, Audi, Nissan, Volvo, Porsche, and more.

Related Roundup: CarPlay
Tag: Tesla

Apple is likely to release a successor to the original HomePod next year that will feature a new display on top supporting new touch interactions, according to Mark Gurman.

homepod feature blue2
Writing in the latest edition of his Power On newsletter, the Bloomberg journalist says the smart speaker will have a similar size and boast comparable audio quality as the original, now discontinued HomePod, and will be powered by the future Apple Watch Series 8 chip, the S8 processor.

The HomePod, code-named B620, will run the same S8 chip coming to the watches and will be closer to the original HomePod in terms of size and audio performance rather than a new HomePod mini. The new HomePod will have an updated display on top and there's even been some talk of multi-touch functionality.

According to Gurman, the S8 chip in the new HomePod will have the same specifications as the S7 chip, which was also the same as the S6 used in 2020's Apple Watch Series 6. For context, the current HomePod mini uses the S5 chip that was introduced with Apple Watch Series 5.

In 2021, Gurman reported that Apple shelved plans for a direct successor to the HomePod that was originally scheduled to launch in 2022. Since then, Gurman has reported that Apple is working on new HomePod models with a display and a camera to compete with the likes of Amazon's Echo Show and Facebook's Portal, although that now sounds like a different device altogether.

Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo recently claimed Apple is working on an updated version of the HomePod that could come in the fourth quarter of 2022 or the first quarter of 2023. Kuo cautioned that there "may not be much innovation in hardware design" compared to the original HomePod, but that is unlikely to concern fans of the discontinued model.

The original HomePod was announced in 2017, and was Apple's first foray into the competitive smart speaker market. Apple discontinued the HomePod in March 2021 to focus on the HomePod mini and due to lackluster sales.

Gurman's latest newsletter also mentioned Apple's intention to bring always-on display features to this year's iPhone 14 Pro models, as well as launch a new Mac mini with an M2 Pro chip, and a new Apple TV with an A14 chip.

Following the launch of Apple's new 13-inch MacBook Pro with the M2 chip, it has been discovered that the $1,299 base model with 256GB of storage has significantly slower SSD read/write speeds compared to the equivalent previous-generation model.

13 inch macbook pro m2 mock feature 2
YouTube channels such as Max Tech and Created Tech tested the 256GB model with Blackmagic's Disk Speed Test app and found that the SSD's read and write speeds are both around 1,450 MB/s, which is around 50% slower reading and around 30% slower writing compared to the 13-inch MacBook Pro with the M1 chip and 256GB of storage.

Disk Speed Test app numbers shared by Max Yuryev of Max Tech:

  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (M1/256GB) Read Speed: 2,900
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (M2/256GB) Read Speed: 1,446
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (M1/256GB) Write Speed: 2,215
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro (M2/256GB) Write Speed: 1,463

Yuryev disassembled the new 13-inch MacBook Pro and discovered that the 256GB model is equipped with only a single NAND flash storage chip, whereas the previous model has two NAND chips that are likely 128GB each. This difference likely explains why the new model has a slower SSD, as multiple NAND chips allows for faster speeds in parallel.



It appears that only the base model 13-inch MacBook Pro with M2 chip has a slower SSD. As noted in the MacRumors forums, Aaron Zollo ran the Disk Speed Test app on the 512GB model and the SSD's read/write speeds were similar to all M1 models, but getting these speeds will require spending at least $1,499. This likely means that the 512GB model remains equipped with two 256GB flash storage chips.


It's unclear why the new base model 13-inch MacBook Pro is only equipped with a single NAND chip, but costs and/or supply constraints are two possible factors. We've reached out to Apple for comment and will update this story if we hear back.

Slower SSD speeds can impact common tasks such as transferring files to an external drive, and overall performance can also take a slight hit since Macs temporarily use SSD space as virtual memory when physical RAM is fully used. If you are considering the new 13-inch MacBook Pro and faster SSD speeds are important to you, we recommend ordering a model with at least 512GB of storage (or better yet, wait for the new MacBook Air in July).

The new 13-inch MacBook Pro launched on Friday. The base model's slower SSD speeds were not mentioned in many (any?) embargoed reviews of the notebook, as it appears that Apple provided many reviewers with a 1TB configuration for testing.

It remains to be seen if the new MacBook Air with the M2 chip will also have slower SSD speeds when configured with 256GB of storage.

Related Roundup: 13" MacBook Pro
Related Forum: MacBook Pro