Apple Music

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Apple introduced the new Apple Music service at its Worldwide Developers Conference on June 8, 2015. Launched in over 100 countries on June 30 as part of iOS 8.4, Apple Music is headlined by a streaming music service priced at $9.99 per month for a single user or $14.99 per month for a family plan of up to six users. The streaming plan integrates access to over 30 million tracks from the iTunes Store with your own music from other sources. Tracks and playlists are available for offline access as well.

Alongside the subscription service is Beats 1, a 24/7 global streaming music channel led by former BBC DJ Zane Lowe. A revamped version of Apple's free iTunes Radio service with a multitude of curated genre-based stations is also included. A third component of Apple Music is Connect, a place for artists to share audio, video, photos, lyrics, and more with fans.

Access to the Beats 1 radio station and Connect is free of charge to all users with an Apple ID, but paying Apple Music subscribers will get certain benefits such as unlimited skipping of radio tracks, access to additional radio stations, the ability to play, save, and like content on Connect, and more.

'Apple Music' How Tos

How to Move Your Playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

We've been experimenting with Apple Music for over a month now, but there are still a few important questions that pop up with the new music streaming service, the first being "How can I import my playlists from Spotify?" The short answer is that you can't without using third-party software. After much research, we've found there are two fairly reliable third-party services that work well. One is called STAMP, and the other is called Move to Apple Music. Both automatically search for and add tracks from Spotify to Apple Music so you don't have to manually go through your entire collection song-by-song. While the end result is pretty much the same, each app offers different features. Before you get started, make sure you are logged into iTunes with your Apple ID and subscribed to Apple Music. With both STAMP and Move to Apple Music, you can download the program from each company's website. Both apps must be given special permission to control your computer.

How to Download Beats 1 Playlists for Offline Listening

Now that you've been testing out Apple Music for about a month, you've probably come across some questions about what else you can do with the streaming music service. We sure have. If you are a fan of Beats 1 but don't want to use up your data listening to Zane Lowe's voice on your commute to work everyday, you can download the playlist from your favorite deejays and listen to their chosen tunes offline for as long as you wish. You can't listen to Beats 1 live in offline mode, but you can access playlists from a deejay's previous radio show similar to the way you would access cable movies and television shows on-demand. Step 1: Find a Deejay The first thing you will need to do is find the deejay playlist you wish to listen to. If you want to find out whom Elton John is listening to, or think Julie Adenuga plays the songs you want to hear, you can find their Beats 1 playlists on their Apple Connect pages by performing a quick search in iTunes while in the Radio tab. The search will usually turn up "X on Beats 1" where X is the name of the deejay. Select that result to see a list of the deejay's playlists. Tracks will be listed by date, so you can easily find the most recent radio show, or even start from the beginning.

Tips for Getting Siri to Play Tracks in Apple Music

If you are signed up for the free, three-month trial of Apple Music, you probably know by now many of the cool features the streaming music service has to offer. But, did you know that Siri can make the experience even better? We've got a few tips for getting Siri to act as your digital deejay. To get the full use of Siri's compatibility with Apple Music, make sure you are subscribed and your iCloud Music Library is on. Play a Radio Station or Beats 1 Not only can Siri play a radio station like Electronic or Oldies, but now the personal assistant can also start playing live Beats 1 programming. Just ask her to "Play Beats 1." Play an Apple Music Playlist One of the things I love about Apple Music is the playlist feature in the For You section. If I've recently "liked" a particular song, A new playlist based on that will show up. If you know the name of an Apple Music created playlist, ask for it specifically. For example, "Play Souxie & The Banshees: Deep Cuts." What Song is Playing If Apple Music is playing a song you don't recognize, you can ask for more information. Just say, "What song is this?" to discover the artist and song title. Add an Album to Your Playlist If you like the song that is playing and want to hear the whole album, ask Siri to add the album to your playlist and it will begin playing after the current track is finished.

Apple Music Tidbits: Nicknames, Playlist Management, and More

Apple's new subscription-based music service launched earlier this week, and even if you've taken advantage of Apple's free three-month trial to see if it is worth your dime and time, there are a few things you may not have discovered yet about its features. While our Getting Started guide gives an overview of how to get up and running, this article gives more details on some of the things you can do with Apple Music and how to make it work for you. If you've noticed any other features we haven't listed yet, feel free to let us know in the forums. Add a Nickname to Your Profile You could stick with your full Apple ID name, or change it to something that fits you better. Apple lets you add a nickname to your ID, which will be displayed on playlists and comments. Nicknames are unique, so the earlier you grab one, the better. On iOS: Open the Music app and tap on any of the main section icons in the bottom toolbar if you're not already on a main page. Tap the silhouette profile icon in the upper left corner of the main screen. Tap your name. Then tap the Edit button to add a nickname. In iTunes: Click on the arrow next to your name, and then click on your Apple ID. Enter a nickname in the fill-in form. Start a Station Based on a Song or Album You can start a new station based on a song or album in either your music library or Apple Music. Tap the three dots next to the song or album to call up additional options. Then, tap "Start Station" on iOS or "New station from artist or song" on OS X to begin listening to tracks.

How to Disable Automatic Subscription Following Apple Music Trial

Apple Music made its worldwide debut in over 100 countries on June 30, with a free three-month trial available for customers to try the streaming music service. Apple requires having a valid payment method associated with your iTunes account to enable the trial, such as a credit card, and both Individual Plan and Family Plan subscriptions are set to automatically renew after the trial. For those that only want to try the Apple Music trial, learn how to turn off automatic renewal below. How to Disable Automatic Renewal Tap on the Account icon in the top-left corner of any tab in Apple Music. Tap on "View Apple ID" and sign into your iTunes Store account. Tap on "Manage" under the "Subscriptions" menu. Tap on your Apple Music Membership, which should currently be "Active." Toggle off "Automatic Renewal" under the "Renewal Options" menu. Confirm the action. Turning off automatic renewal will enable you to try out Apple Music on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch without the streaming music service renewing after the free three-month trial period expires. To reenable a recurring Apple Music subscription, simply follow the steps above and toggle on automatic renewal again. Your settings will also be applied to the iTunes version of Apple Music on Mac and

'Apple Music' Guides

Getting Started With Apple Music and Beats 1 on iOS, Mac and PC

Today marks the official worldwide launch of Apple Music, a subscription-based streaming music service and Spotify rival for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac, PC and, later this year, Apple TV and Android. Apple Music, arguably the company's biggest music initiative since opening the iTunes Store in 2003, requires updating to iOS 8.4 on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch or downloading iTunes 12.2 for Mac and PC. Apple Music Apple Music is an all-in-one streaming music service, live global radio station and social platform for artists to connect with fans. The service costs $9.99 per month, the same price as virtually all streaming music competitors, although Apple is offering a free three-month trial period to encourage customers to try it out. Apple Music is available in over 100 countries, including the United States. Apple Music provides unlimited streaming of almost the entire iTunes Store catalog of music without needing to purchase songs or albums individually. Instead of paying $1.29 per song download, for example, subscribers have millions of songs at their fingertips for essentially the cost of an album. A family plan through iTunes Sharing for up to six members is also available for $14.99 per month. Built into the stock Music app on iOS 8.4 and iTunes on Mac and PC, Apple Music provides side-by-side access to both your downloaded iTunes songs and albums and streaming music library, which should prove to be a more convenient option than third-party apps such as Spotify, Google Play Music and Rdio for most Apple users. Apple succinctly describes it as "the

'Apple Music' Articles

Spotify Matches Apple Music $14.99 Per Month Family Plan

Spotify has upgraded its family plan to directly match Apple Music's offering, with up to six Premium accounts per family now available for $14.99 a month (via The Verge). Spotify says users under the family plan will receive their own separate premium accounts and have full access to Spotify's library of songs and videos. Existing subscribers meanwhile will automatically be upgraded to the new plan and should receive a lower bill in the next month. The plan rolls out globally today, except for users of the music streaming service residing in Canada. The move follows in the footsteps of Google Play, which matched Apple Music's family plan in December. Earlier this month Spotify claimed it had experienced a faster pace of growth since the launch of Apple Music, reaching 30 million paying subscribers compared to the 20 million it had when the rival service launched last June. In April, Apple claimed 13 million subscribers, up from 11 million users in February. At the beginning of May, Apple introduced a 50% discount for all student subscribers to Apple Music, offering those eligible a $4.99 per month deal. Apple Music is widely expected to see a design overhaul in time for WWDC this year, due to be held June 13–17 in

Apple Confirms Music Deletion Glitch, Says Fix Incoming in Future iTunes Update

Apple today confirmed reports of an issue that causes music from personal collections to be deleted, telling The Loop it only affects a small number of users and that a fix is incoming in an iTunes update next week. “In an extremely small number of cases users have reported that music files saved on their computer were removed without their permission,” Apple said. “We’re taking these reports seriously as we know how important music is to our customers and our teams are focused on identifying the cause. We have not been able to reproduce this issue, however, we’re releasing an update to iTunes early next week which includes additional safeguards. If a user experiences this issue they should contact AppleCare.”Last week, debate raged over the supposed glitch after Vellum's Jake Pinkstone wrote a blogpost complaining that Apple Music had deleted 122 GB of his personal music collection without his permission after he joined the service. The deletion occurred after Pinkstone had his music library scanned by Apple to make his collection available across his devices. Confusion ensued after Pinkstone was told by an Apple Support Representative named Amber that Apple Music's matching system was "functioning as intended." When asked whether Apple Music was supposed to delete his personal music without his permission, Amber responded "yes." Amber's statement, however, was inaccurate according to Apple's own support document. While the causation of the bug is still unknown, as Apple has failed to reproduce the issue, the company's statement suggests Apple has narrowed down

Taylor Swift Dances Like No One's Watching in Newest Apple Music Ad

Taylor Swift this morning tweeted out a new ad for Apple Music, this time showcasing a playlist called "Friday Night Rocks!" recommended to the singer within the For You tab of the music streaming service. The new commercial plays out in a way similar to Swift's previous ad, which saw her lip syncing to Jimmy Eat World as she prepared for a night out. This time, however, she dances around her living room alone to the tune of The Darkness' "I Believe In A Thing Called Love." Dance like no one's watching @AppleMusic @thedarknesshttps://t.co/QfX9l0EXX7— Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) May 12, 2016 After the last ad, Apple Music head of content Larry Jackson confirmed that the company had created a series of commercials with Swift, and would continue a steady rollout of them, akin to the release of singles on a record. Previous Coverage: Apple Music is 'Distractingly Good' for Taylor Swift in New Ad

Apple Aiming to End iTunes Music Downloads in Two Years [Update: Apple Says 'Not True']

Apple allegedly has an aggressive plan to "terminate" music downloads from iTunes within two years, reports Digital Music News citing sources with "close and active business relationships" with Apple. Apple is also rumored to be considering a three to four year timeline for the shutdown of iTunes downloads, but overall discussions with Apple executives are said to focus "not on if, but when" the company should retire music downloads. Termination of music downloads could be staggered by country based on the popularity of streaming content in different regions.Back to the story, the sources indicated that a range of shutdown timetables are being considered by Apple, though one executive noted that "keeping [iTunes music downloads] running forever isn't really on the table anymore." Also under discussion is a plan to "ride the [iTunes music download offering] out for the next 3-4 years, maybe longer," when paid music downloads are likely to be an afterthought in a streaming-dominated industry. [...] According to one source, an initial shutdown could take place in 'tier 1' countries like the United States, UK, and leading countries in Europe and Asia, with 'tier 2' and 'tier 3' countries experiencing a staggered shutdown in subsequent years.The timeline is unclear because Apple's iTunes business continues to bring in hundreds of millions of dollars each year, but it is on the decline due to the rise of streaming music services. According to music industry Mark Mulligan, iTunes music downloads will be worth $600 million in 2019, down from $3.9 billion in 2012. Mulligan

Spotify Growing at Faster Pace Since Apple Music Launched Last Year

Despite the launch of Apple Music, which recently reached 13 million paid subscribers, rival service Spotify told Reuters that it has experienced a faster pace of growth since last June than beforehand."It's great that Apple is in the game. They are definitely raising the profile of streaming. It is hard to build an industry on your own," Jonathan Forster, a vice president and one of its first employees, told Reuters in an interview. "Since Apple Music started we've been growing quicker and adding more users than before."Spotify recently announced that it has 30 million paying customers, compared to around 20 million paid subscribers last June, while its total active user base has grown to nearly 100 million from 75 million a year ago. Apple has not recently disclosed how many users it has on a three-month trial for an overall comparison, but Spotify remains over 2x to 2.5x larger than Apple Music in terms of paid subscribers worldwide."It would be terrible if we were just taking each other's users or to learn there was just a ceiling of 100 million users - I don't think that is the case," said Forster, who had just returned to Stockholm from the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in California.Apple Music has inevitably generated increased awareness of the concept of streaming music, which in turn has helped Spotify triple its paid subscriber base in just two years. The service, which launched in Europe in October 2008 and expanded to the U.S. in July 2011, had 10 million subscribers through May 2014. Spotify continues to operate at a loss due to expensive

Drake's New Album 'Views' Sells One Million Copies in Five Days Under Apple Exclusivity

Although Drake's newest album "Views" was only available on iTunes and Apple Music for one week, under the terms of the company's exclusivity deal with the artist, the album managed to sell more than one million copies in just five days, which The Wall Street Journal calls "a rare achievement in an age of rapid streaming growth and declining sales of downloads and CDs." Most of those sales numbers -- 632,000 copies to be exact -- came within the first 24 hours of release, with the rest trickling over the one million mark in the subsequent days. The figures specifically target sales for the $13.99 iTunes copy of Views, but Apple Music showed some impressive streaming statistics for Drake's new album, as well. In total, Views was streamed more than 250 million times worldwide, 200 million of which were inside the United States, suggesting Apple Music managed to get some of the artist's fans to sign up for the service beyond its current 13 million paid subscribers. The results fly in the face of industry fears that paid streaming services might hasten the continuing decline of music sales, which have fallen by more than 60% in the past 15 years, according to data from Nielsen. While that could still eventually happen, plenty of fans purchased the $13.99 Drake album last week even though they could also access it immediately, along with some 30 million other tracks, by subscribing to Apple Music for $9.99 a month—or even just by signing up for a free trial. As Drake's album launched on April 29, his record label’s parent company, Vivendi SA’s Universal Music

Debate Rages Over Whether Apple Music Automatically Deletes Users' Owned Music Collections

Apple Music is the center of a heated debate this week, with involved parties arguing over whether or not the service is deleting Apple Music users' song collections from hard drives after uploading them to iCloud Music Library. Vellum's James Pinkstone wrote a long complaint on May 4 accusing Apple Music of doing just that. According to Pinkstone, Apple Music deleted 122GB of his original music files after he joined Apple Music and had his music library scanned by Apple to make his personal content available across multiple devices. When I signed up for Apple Music, iTunes evaluated my massive collection of Mp3s and WAV files, scanned Apple's database for what it considered matches, then removed the original files from my internal hard drive. REMOVED them. Deleted. If Apple Music saw a file it didn't recognize--which came up often, since I'm a freelance composer and have many music files that I created myself--it would then download it to Apple's database, delete it from my hard drive, and serve it back to me when I wanted to listen, just like it would with my other music files it had deleted.The process Pinkstone describes above is not how Apple Music's matching feature works, according to an in-depth explanation shared by iMore. Apple will match songs and upload original songs by converting them into an appropriate format, but it does not delete without user intervention. iMore theorizes that Pinkstone accidentally wiped his own library by misunderstanding confusing dialog options. Whatever the case, Apple Music was never designed to delete Pinkstone's source

Apple Music Connect to Be Removed From Music App Tab Bar in iOS 10

Earlier this week rumors suggested that an Apple Music overhaul is being prepared for a worldwide reveal at WWDC this June, with a launch in the fall within iOS 10. New details shared today by 9to5Mac indicate that one of the streaming music service's least-used features -- the social network-like section called Connect -- will be "demoted" in the overhaul and removed from the app's tab bar completely. Although some users have gone through the process of removing Connect already, allowing them a dedicated Playlist tab in its place, iOS 10 will see Apple moving Connect permanently from the bottom tab and into an integrated section of the "For You" page of Apple Music. Because of this, Connect "is unlikely to see notable new features this year," suggesting this section of Apple Music hasn't lived up to the company's plans laid out at WWDC last year. Overall, the new version of Apple Music is said to focus on black and white backgrounds along with an emphasis on individual album artwork in tracklists. Other basic updates include the introduction of Apple's San Francisco font, a new "Browse" tab, lyrics support, and new 3D Touch shortcut previews. Apple Music's streaming radio network, Beats 1, is believed to remain largely the same as it is currently presented in the app. Read More: Eight Months Later, Apple Music Connect Still 'Fails Miserably' at Social

Apple Introduces Apple Music Student Membership Option With 50% Discount at $4.99 per Month

Apple will today introduce an Apple Music student plan that discounts the streaming service by 50 percent for those who are enrolled in an eligible college or university (via TechCrunch). The new plan means any academic student in the United States can now pick up an individual Apple Music membership for $4.99 a month, rather than pay the standard $9.99 subscription rate. U.S. students won't be the only ones to benefit though, as the plan is also open to students in the U.K., Germany, Denmark, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand. The actual cost is expected to vary slightly from country to country, but all markets will see 50 percent off the standard subscription rate. The student discount is offered for up to four continuous or non-continuous years after sign-up, so students are able to take gap years or breaks between semesters and still sign up again when they return to study. Additionally, the plan is open to all students of all ages, regardless of degree. The membership tier will be available starting today to both new and existing subscribers. Students can sign up or change their membership online, or go through the Apple Music mobile app. Apple is using student verification technology provider, UNiDAY, to ensure that those who are signing up as students are actually enrolled at a supported institution. News of the student plan comes two days after it was reported that Apple is planning to overhaul its year-old music streaming service to make it more intuitive. The company is set to redesign the user interface, which will be "bolder, yet simpler",

Apple Music Set for Design Overhaul in Time for WWDC in June

Apple is planning to overhaul its year-old music streaming service to make it "more easy to use", according to people familiar with the matter (via Bloomberg News). The company is set to redesign the user interface to make it more intuitive, said the sources, who asked to remain anonymous because the plans are yet to be made public. Apple also means to significantly enhance the integration of its streaming and download businesses and expand its online radio service. According to Bloomberg, a full reboot of Apple Music is to be unveiled at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June and will be accompanied by a fresh marketing campaign to entice customers to the subscription-based service, which currently costs $10 per month. Apple Music was introduced with much fanfare back in June 2015. While many commentators gave generally positive reviews, the service was criticized for its muddled interface and dearth of features. Meanwhile, Taylor Swift penned an open letter to the Cupertino company criticizing it for not paying artists during the service's free three-month trial and explaining her decision not to make her album 1989 available to stream on Apple Music. Artists have also complained that Apple Music's social aspect, called Connect, "fails miserably" in its aims. Apple has struggled to integrate its employees and unite the streaming and downloading businesses into a cohesive music strategy, according to the latest report. As a result, the service is now being overseen by content head Robert Kondrk and Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor. Design chief

Apple Music for Android Gains Support for Music Videos, Family Billing Plan

Apple today updated its Apple Music app designed for Android devices, adding support for family memberships and watching music videos, features already available in the iOS version of Apple Music. Starting today, Android users have access to music videos in the Apple Music app, such as Taylor Swift's live 1989 World Tour video. Since the launch of Apple Music, Apple has focused some of its attention on music video content, and in recent months, its video push has been expanding. In the future, Apple is expected to introduce a full television show to promote Apple Music, starring Apple executive Dr. Dre. Today's Android update also allows Android users to subscribe to or upgrade to a family subscription plan, which allows up to six family members to access Apple Music content for $14.99 per month. Apple Music for Android launched in November of 2015, marking Apple's the release of Apple's first major app for Android users. The Android app is available in all the countries where Apple Music for iOS is available and allows Android users to subscribe to Apple Music and listen on Android-based devices. The Android Apple Music app can be downloaded from the Google Play Store for free. It comes with a free three-month Apple Music

Apple Promotes New Apple Music API Introduced in iOS 9.3

With the launch of iOS 9.3, Apple introduced a new Apple Music API, which is today being promoted through Apple's Affiliate Program Newsletter. The Apple Music API gives developers the resources to expand Apple Music functionality in their apps, through the following features: - Developers can see if a user is currently a member - Developers can see which country the users account is based - Developers can queue up the next song or songs based on a song ID for playback - Developers can inspect playlists already in My Music or create a new playlists with a title and description (see App Store Review Guidelines for limitation) The iOS 9.3 Apple Music API has already been built into several music-related apps, such as Shazam. The API is what enables Shazam and other music apps to do things like add songs to Apple Music playlists from directly within the Shazam app. As noted by MacStories, Apple has also launched a new Apple Music Best Practices webpage for app developers and expanded App Store Review Guidelines for Apple Music. According to Apple's guidelines, apps using the Apple Music API are subject to the following restrictions: - Apps using the Apple Music API that trigger playback without explicit user action will be rejected - Apps using the Apple Music API must expose and respect standard media controls such as "play," pause," and "skip" - Apps using the Apple Music API may not require payment or otherwise monetize access to the Apple Music service (e.g. in-app purchase, advertising, requesting user info) Apple's developer page on Apple Music

Apple Music Now Has 13 Million Paying Subscribers

According to Apple CEO Tim Cook, Apple Music now has 13 million paying subscribers, up from 11 million users just two months ago. In a February interview, Eddy Cue and Craig Federighi said Apple Music had 11 million subscribers, suggesting impressive growth over the past 10 weeks. Apple Music launched in more than 100 countries on June 30, 2015 and will see its first anniversary in two months. At its current growth rate, Apple Music is on track to have somewhere around 15 million subscribers, gaining significant ground on Spotify, which reported more than 20 million paying subscribers and 75 million active users in the weeks ahead of Apple Music's debut. Since its launch, Apple has heavily promoted Apple Music with exclusive releases and videos from artists like Taylor Swift and Drake and dynamic content on its free Beats 1 radio service. Apple plans to continue on with its Apple Music advertising and in the future, will debut a television show starring Dr. Dre. Apple Music is priced at $9.99 per month for individual users and $14.99 per month for a family of up to six users, which can be paid for using an iTunes account. Apple has seen success with Apple Music in part due to the large number of credit cards already attached to iTunes accounts, making it easy for customers to subscribe to Apple services and purchase Apple

Drake Announces Apple Music as a Sponsor of Upcoming 'Summer Sixteen' Tour

Drake and Apple have been in a partnership since the launch of Apple Music last summer, with the artist contributing his own Beats 1 radio show to the streaming service and recently announcing that his upcoming album, Views From The 6, will be exclusive to Apple Music and iTunes for one week. In an Instagram post today, Drake confirmed his partnership with Apple will continue into live music as Apple Music will sponsor his "Summer Sixteen" tour (via The Verge). The tour kicks off July 20 in Austin, Texas, and features the artist Future as a co-headliner with Drake. In the brief Instagram announcement, no specifics were given regarding the nature of Apple Music's sponsorship of the tour, besides the decorative inclusion of the Apple Music logo on the Summer Sixteen poster. The partnership could open the possibility for the streaming service to give fans some kind of exclusive glimpse into Drake's performances, akin to Taylor Swift's 1989 World Tour documentary released last December. Those interested in tickets for the Sumer Sixteen tour will be able to purchase them beginning April 29. The tour will visit over thirty cities in the United States and Canada, ending on September 17 in Vancouver. One of Drake and Future's well-known songs, "Jumpman," was used by Apple in a recent Apple Music ad starring Taylor

Apple Celebrates Earth Day With Selection of Apple Music Playlists

Apple kicked off its Earth Day celebrations last Thursday, outfitting retail employees with green shirts, decorating Apple Store logos with green leaves, and launching an "Apps for Earth" promotion that will see in-app purchases from partner apps donated to the World Wildlife Fund. Apple is also celebrating Earth Day, which takes place on Friday, April 22, with a selection of Earth-inspired Apple Music playlists. There are five playlists available, each with a collection of 22 to 25 songs spanning a wide range of genres and musical tastes, as outlined below. Celebrating Mother Earth - From sun and sky to seas and trees, musicians pay tribute to the natural world in this set of uplifting tunes. Songs included are from artists like The Beatles, Coldplay, U2, Peter Gabriel, Michael Jackson, John Denver, and Cat Stevens. Power Off - Laidback, moody, contemplative tunes for when it's time to chill. Songs included are from artists like Bruno Mars, Rihanna, Coldplay, Ed Sheeran, Sia, Adele, Maroon 5, Ryan Adams, and Alicia Keys. From the Roots - Rustic. Earthy. Unplugged. Timeless. Revel in this mix of straight up classics from rock's most iconic artists and their acoustic guitars. Songs included are from artists like Fleetwood Mac, Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, Bon Iver, Nirvana, Bruce Springsteen, and The Who. Recycle: Covers - Anything goes when these legendary tunes are given a brand-new touch. Songs include well-known covers from a number of artists like The White Stripes, David Bowie, Adele, Johnny Cash, Yo La Tengo, Saint Etienne, and Smashing Pumpkins. Am

Taylor Swift Lip Syncs to Jimmy Eat World in New Apple Music Ad [Updated]

A few weeks after starring in her first advertisement for Apple Music, singer Taylor Swift has partnered with Apple again on a second ad for its streaming music service. In the video, which Swift tweeted earlier this morning, the singer again showcases Apple Music's "Activity Playlists" feature by focusing on the "Getting Ready to Go Out" category this time around. At the beginning of the video, Swift navigates to a collection of songs under the "Jukebox Hits: 00s Alternative Rock" playlist and chooses Jimmy Eat World's song "The Middle" as her background music. She mentions that she "used to listen to this in middle school" and begins lip syncing the lyrics in front of a mirror. After Swift's dance-filled jam session comes to a close, the ad ends with the tagline that Apple Music has "every song for every moment," and reminds those who have yet to sign up that the service has a three month free trial available to any new member. Getting ready to go out… @AppleMusic @JimmyEatWorldhttps://t.co/vq8LCFOuCO— Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) April 18, 2016 Swift's partnership with Apple on its new Apple Music ads comes nearly a year after the much-publicized dispute between the two, which began when the singer penned an open letter to Apple about its policy of not paying artists during the three month free trial for the streaming service. After Apple reversed course, Swift's best-selling album 1989 appeared on the service, and she eventually even launched an exclusive tour documentary for Apple Music in December. Update: Apple Music head of content Larry Jackson

Drake's New Album to be Exclusive to Apple Music for One Week

Drake's new album, Views From The 6, will be exclusive to Apple Music for one week starting on April 29, Apple confirmed to BuzzFeed News. After that week, the album will be available on other music streaming services like Spotify. Apple and Drake have had a friendly relationship since the announcement of Apple Music, with the artist appearing at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference to help introduce the service. Apple also produced the music video for the rapper's song "Energy" with its in-house production team. More recently, Drake's collaboration with Future, "Jumpman," was used for Taylor Swift's Apple Music ad. In August, Quartz found that Drake was the second most played artist on Apple Music. Apple Music has increasingly turned to popular music artists in an effort to differentiate it from competitors. Artists like DJ Khaled have been given radio shows on Beats 1 while others, like Taylor Swift, have given the service exclusives, like Swift's music documentary on her 1989 world tour.

Apple Music is 'Distractingly Good' for Taylor Swift in New Ad

Apple today debuted a new ad for its music streaming service Apple Music, this time centering around a workout session by artist Taylor Swift. The singer posted the 1-minute video on Twitter earlier this morning, captioning it as "based on true events." In the commercial, she begins preparing for a treadmill workout by browsing Apple Music for some workout-related songs. After navigating through the service's recommended Activity Playlists and landing on the Running sub-category, Swift decides on a playlist called "#GYMFLOW" and begins listening to Drake & Future's song "Jumpman." As the video continues, Swift gets really into the song and sings along with the lyrics, ultimately leading her to wipe out on the treadmill with the accompanying tagline for the video describing Apple Music as "distractingly good." Based on true events. #TAYLORvsTREADMILL @applemusic @Drake @1Futurehttps://t.co/ryUY3Yz7Prhttps://t.co/1eIHjoVIFU— Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) April 1, 2016 Unlike the "For You" section of Apple Music, the pre-set playlists found on the service's New tab are the same for every user and get specifically curated for different events -- like a BBQ or studying -- by Apple behind the

Soundcloud’s New $9.99 Streaming Service to Compete With Apple Music [Updated]

In a recent update to its iOS app, popular streaming music platform Soundcloud added a subscription model into the service that will provide users with a few premium monthly upgrades on top of the discoverability and personalization previously offered. As discovered by The Verge, the service is called "Soundcloud Go" and will run users $12.99 on a monthly basis if purchased through the App Store, with a free 30 day trial to test the waters beforehand. Outside of the iOS App Store, SoundCloud Go will cost $9.99/month. The announcement has yet to be made official by Soundcloud, but in the version 4.0.0 update release notes, the company lists a few ways upgrading to the monthly subscription could benefit its users. These advantages include a bolstered track list, the ability to listen offline, and the removal of interspersed advertisements within playlists. Upgrade to SoundCloud Go to: - Play all tracks Access a newly expanded catalog of everything from Grammy-winners to garage bands - Listen offline Listen to your favorite tracks anytime, anywhere, with or without a signal - Go ad-free Listen without any ad interruptions Soundcloud Go joins a growing list of streaming music services on offer for users to choose from, most of which are available on iOS for $9.99 per month: Apple Music, Spotify Premium, and Tidal, among others. There are variations on monthly subscriptions when factoring in family plans and an upper-tier "Tidal HiFi" offering that promises better quality sound for $19.99/month, but for the most part SoundCloud Go will enter the streaming

Kanye West Releases Single 'Famous' From New Album on Apple Music [Updated]

Although Kanye West's entire new album, "The Life of Pablo," remains exclusive to Tidal, the artist recently released a single onto rival services like Apple Music, Google Play, and Spotify (via Pitchfork). The song available is called "Famous," and is described as "a sinister reflection on fame - featuring a Rihanna hook and brilliant samples" by the Editor's Notes on Apple Music. The release of Famous comes a few weeks after West tweeted that The Life of Pablo would "never never never" come to Apple Music or iTunes. The context of that tweet may point towards a less-than-serious mindset from the artist, because around the same time he tweeted about being $53 million in debt while using the social network to ask for money from Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. In the transition to the new services, Famous also got a lyric change. The line reading "she be Puerto Rican day parade wavin'" was replaced with "she in school to be a real estate agent" on Apple Music, Google Play, and Spotify. Those interested can listen to Famous from The Life of Pablo on Apple Music here. Update 4/1: The Life of Pablo is officially available for fans to listen on Apple Music, Google Play, and Spotify, ending its previous exclusivity with Tidal. The album is also available as a $20 download from West's official website.