Apple Music

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Apple introduced the new Apple Music service at its Worldwide Developers Conference on June 8, 2015. Launched in over 100 countries on June 30 as part of iOS 8.4, Apple Music is headlined by a streaming music service priced at $9.99 per month for a single user or $14.99 per month for a family plan of up to six users. The streaming plan integrates access to over 30 million tracks from the iTunes Store with your own music from other sources. Tracks and playlists are available for offline access as well.

Alongside the subscription service is Beats 1, a 24/7 global streaming music channel led by former BBC DJ Zane Lowe. A revamped version of Apple's free iTunes Radio service with a multitude of curated genre-based stations is also included. A third component of Apple Music is Connect, a place for artists to share audio, video, photos, lyrics, and more with fans.

Access to the Beats 1 radio station and Connect is free of charge to all users with an Apple ID, but paying Apple Music subscribers will get certain benefits such as unlimited skipping of radio tracks, access to additional radio stations, the ability to play, save, and like content on Connect, and more.

'Apple Music' How Tos

How to Move Your Playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

We've been experimenting with Apple Music for over a month now, but there are still a few important questions that pop up with the new music streaming service, the first being "How can I import my playlists from Spotify?" The short answer is that you can't without using third-party software. After much research, we've found there are two fairly reliable third-party services that work well. One is called STAMP, and the other is called Move to Apple Music. Both automatically search for and add tracks from Spotify to Apple Music so you don't have to manually go through your entire collection song-by-song. While the end result is pretty much the same, each app offers different features. Before you get started, make sure you are logged into iTunes with your Apple ID and subscribed to Apple Music. With both STAMP and Move to Apple Music, you can download the program from each company's website. Both apps must be given special permission to control your computer.

How to Download Beats 1 Playlists for Offline Listening

Now that you've been testing out Apple Music for about a month, you've probably come across some questions about what else you can do with the streaming music service. We sure have. If you are a fan of Beats 1 but don't want to use up your data listening to Zane Lowe's voice on your commute to work everyday, you can download the playlist from your favorite deejays and listen to their chosen tunes offline for as long as you wish. You can't listen to Beats 1 live in offline mode, but you can access playlists from a deejay's previous radio show similar to the way you would access cable movies and television shows on-demand. Step 1: Find a Deejay The first thing you will need to do is find the deejay playlist you wish to listen to. If you want to find out whom Elton John is listening to, or think Julie Adenuga plays the songs you want to hear, you can find their Beats 1 playlists on their Apple Connect pages by performing a quick search in iTunes while in the Radio tab. The search will usually turn up "X on Beats 1" where X is the name of the deejay. Select that result to see a list of the deejay's playlists. Tracks will be listed by date, so you can easily find the most recent radio show, or even start from the beginning.

Tips for Getting Siri to Play Tracks in Apple Music

If you are signed up for the free, three-month trial of Apple Music, you probably know by now many of the cool features the streaming music service has to offer. But, did you know that Siri can make the experience even better? We've got a few tips for getting Siri to act as your digital deejay. To get the full use of Siri's compatibility with Apple Music, make sure you are subscribed and your iCloud Music Library is on. Play a Radio Station or Beats 1 Not only can Siri play a radio station like Electronic or Oldies, but now the personal assistant can also start playing live Beats 1 programming. Just ask her to "Play Beats 1." Play an Apple Music Playlist One of the things I love about Apple Music is the playlist feature in the For You section. If I've recently "liked" a particular song, A new playlist based on that will show up. If you know the name of an Apple Music created playlist, ask for it specifically. For example, "Play Souxie & The Banshees: Deep Cuts." What Song is Playing If Apple Music is playing a song you don't recognize, you can ask for more information. Just say, "What song is this?" to discover the artist and song title. Add an Album to Your Playlist If you like the song that is playing and want to hear the whole album, ask Siri to add the album to your playlist and it will begin playing after the current track is finished.

Apple Music Tidbits: Nicknames, Playlist Management, and More

Apple's new subscription-based music service launched earlier this week, and even if you've taken advantage of Apple's free three-month trial to see if it is worth your dime and time, there are a few things you may not have discovered yet about its features. While our Getting Started guide gives an overview of how to get up and running, this article gives more details on some of the things you can do with Apple Music and how to make it work for you. If you've noticed any other features we haven't listed yet, feel free to let us know in the forums. Add a Nickname to Your Profile You could stick with your full Apple ID name, or change it to something that fits you better. Apple lets you add a nickname to your ID, which will be displayed on playlists and comments. Nicknames are unique, so the earlier you grab one, the better. On iOS: Open the Music app and tap on any of the main section icons in the bottom toolbar if you're not already on a main page. Tap the silhouette profile icon in the upper left corner of the main screen. Tap your name. Then tap the Edit button to add a nickname. In iTunes: Click on the arrow next to your name, and then click on your Apple ID. Enter a nickname in the fill-in form. Start a Station Based on a Song or Album You can start a new station based on a song or album in either your music library or Apple Music. Tap the three dots next to the song or album to call up additional options. Then, tap "Start Station" on iOS or "New station from artist or song" on OS X to begin listening to tracks.

How to Disable Automatic Subscription Following Apple Music Trial

Apple Music made its worldwide debut in over 100 countries on June 30, with a free three-month trial available for customers to try the streaming music service. Apple requires having a valid payment method associated with your iTunes account to enable the trial, such as a credit card, and both Individual Plan and Family Plan subscriptions are set to automatically renew after the trial. For those that only want to try the Apple Music trial, learn how to turn off automatic renewal below. How to Disable Automatic Renewal Tap on the Account icon in the top-left corner of any tab in Apple Music. Tap on "View Apple ID" and sign into your iTunes Store account. Tap on "Manage" under the "Subscriptions" menu. Tap on your Apple Music Membership, which should currently be "Active." Toggle off "Automatic Renewal" under the "Renewal Options" menu. Confirm the action. Turning off automatic renewal will enable you to try out Apple Music on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch without the streaming music service renewing after the free three-month trial period expires. To reenable a recurring Apple Music subscription, simply follow the steps above and toggle on automatic renewal again. Your settings will also be applied to the iTunes version of Apple Music on Mac and

'Apple Music' Guides

Getting Started With Apple Music and Beats 1 on iOS, Mac and PC

Today marks the official worldwide launch of Apple Music, a subscription-based streaming music service and Spotify rival for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac, PC and, later this year, Apple TV and Android. Apple Music, arguably the company's biggest music initiative since opening the iTunes Store in 2003, requires updating to iOS 8.4 on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch or downloading iTunes 12.2 for Mac and PC. Apple Music Apple Music is an all-in-one streaming music service, live global radio station and social platform for artists to connect with fans. The service costs $9.99 per month, the same price as virtually all streaming music competitors, although Apple is offering a free three-month trial period to encourage customers to try it out. Apple Music is available in over 100 countries, including the United States. Apple Music provides unlimited streaming of almost the entire iTunes Store catalog of music without needing to purchase songs or albums individually. Instead of paying $1.29 per song download, for example, subscribers have millions of songs at their fingertips for essentially the cost of an album. A family plan through iTunes Sharing for up to six members is also available for $14.99 per month. Built into the stock Music app on iOS 8.4 and iTunes on Mac and PC, Apple Music provides side-by-side access to both your downloaded iTunes songs and albums and streaming music library, which should prove to be a more convenient option than third-party apps such as Spotify, Google Play Music and Rdio for most Apple users. Apple succinctly describes it as "the

'Apple Music' Articles

Apple Likely Acquired Cloud-Based Music Provider Omnifone [Updated]

One of Apple's latest acquisitions appears to be cloud-based music provider and Omnifone, according to an inside source that shared knowledge of the purchase with MacRumors. Earlier this month, a Music Ally report suggested UK-based Omnifone's tech business and assets had been purchased by a mystery buyer for $10 million, and it seems that buyer is Apple. According to documents covering the sale, Omnifone's alluring patent portfolio was not purchased by Apple, nor were debts or investments, but terms included a "royalty bearing license" that Omnifone says will help it determine the value of its full range of patents. Omnifone has a number of patents relating to downloading music, digital rights management, and generating recommendations that are potentially appealing to streaming music companies. Omnifone operated a cloud platform powering its own MusicStation service and serving as the backbone for music services launched through partnerships with mobile carriers like LG, Samsung, Vodafone, BlackBerry, Sony, and more. Omnifone, for example, powered Samsung's Milk music service in certain locations and it was licensed by PonoMusic to power the PonoMusic Store, which is temporarily unavailable as of today following Apple's purchase of Omnifone. Following its acquisition, Omnifone has abruptly ended all of its partnerships.One of our key infrastructure partners - Omnifone - has recently been acquired by a large company. An impact of this purchase is that all Omnifone's supply relationships are being terminated, effectively immediately. Omnifone has been the

Apple Debuts iTunes Match With Audio Fingerprint for Apple Music Users

Apple has introduced a fix for a persistent and frustrating Apple Music bug that caused pre-existing music libraries to sometimes be improperly matched with Apple Music songs, reports The Loop. To make sure songs are correctly matched, Apple is now using iTunes Match audio fingerprint for Apple Music, a more accurate matching method than the metadata matching that was previously employed. Apple Music matching now also offers up DRM-free music files, just like iTunes Match. Apple has been quietly rolling out iTunes Match audio fingerprint to all Apple Music subscribers. Previously Apple was using a less accurate metadata version of iTunes Match on Apple Music, which wouldn't always match the correct version of a particular song. We've all seen the stories of a live version of a song being replaced by a studio version, etc. Using iTunes Match with audio fingerprint, those problems should be a thing of the past.According to The Loop, the version of iTunes Match that is now available to Apple Music subscribers is actually the same iTunes Match service that iTunes users have been paying for as a separate subscription, with all Apple Music subscribers now eligible to use the full version of iTunes Match at no cost. Confusingly, while Apple Music had song matching available previously, it was not the same service that was offered through iTunes Match. Current Apple Music and iTunes Match subscribers can let their iTunes Match subscriptions expire while continuing to get the same functionality, and should see no changes. iTunes Match users who are not Apple Music

Apple's New Music Royalty Proposal Would Make Streaming Costlier for Free Services Like Spotify

Apple has submitted a proposal to the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board calling for a simplified way to pay songwriters and music publishers for streaming music, according to Billboard. While the change would benefit labels, artists and publishers, it would make it more difficult for streaming services like Spotify to continue offering free tiers. Apple, which has always had a gift for creative simplicity, wants to make this process easier and more transparent, according to a copy of the filing obtained by Billboard. The company’s proposal to the Copyright Royalty Board suggests a simple, “all-in” statutory rate that would be “fair, simple and transparent, unlike the incredibly complicated structure that currently exists.”Apple's suggested rate is 9.1 cents per 100 plays, which would make the songwriting royalties for 100 streams equal to the royalties for a single song download. However, the change would make it more expensive for companies like Spotify and YouTube to offer free music tiers. The current system sees streaming companies paying songwriters and publishers between 10.5 and 12 percent of their revenue using what Billboard terms a "complicated formula." The money is then divided into public performance and mechanical royalties, which is then paid to publishers and "collected societies." Currently, Apple and other streaming music providers don't have to pay publishers the statutory rate set by the Royalty Board because they can negotiate their own deals. However, negotiations between publishers and streaming services would start at a different place should

Katy Perry Debuts Apple Music-Exclusive Single 'Rise' Ahead of Rio Olympics

Apple Music's string of exclusive content continues today with the debut of "Rise," a new single from Katy Perry set to coincide with the upcoming 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio. The song was released late last night, and is an exclusive to iTunes as well as Apple's streaming music service. In a statement, Perry said that the timing of the song felt right to share it now, instead of waiting for her next album, because she sees that "there is a need for our world to unite." NBC also confirmed that it will play Rise as the anthem of the Rio Olympics, with the new single set to play before and throughout the Summer Games. “This is a song that’s been brewing inside me for years, that has finally come to the surface. I was inspired to finish it now, rather than save it for my next album, because now more than ever, there is a need for our world to unite,” the Grammy nominee said in a statement. “I know that together we can rise above the fear – in our country, and around the world. I can’t think of a better example than the Olympic athletes, as they gather in Rio with their strength and fearlessness, to remind us how we ALL can come together, with the resolve to be the best we can be. I hope this song can inspire us to heal, unite, and rise together. I am honored that NBC Olympics has chosen to use it as an anthem before and during the Rio Games.” Apple Music turned one year old in June, with subscriber numbers now reaching above 15 million, which Apple CEO confirmed during WWDC. Also during its keynote in June, Apple revealed an incoming redesign for its streaming music

Apple Music for Android Updated With Playback and Playlist Fixes

Apple Music for Android has been updated with a few bug fixes related to playback and playlist issues. In particular, the update resolves a playback issue where songs skip over the first two seconds of music. It also fixes an issue where albums added to a playlist appear in an unexpected order. Apple Music version 0.9.11 is available on the Google Play store as a free

Apple Accuses Spotify of 'Resorting to Rumors and Half-Truths', Sets Record Straight on App Rejection

Yesterday, Spotify accused Apple of using its App Store approval process as a "weapon to harm competitors" after Apple rejected a Spotify app update, and now Apple has responded to Spotify's accusations to "set the record straight." In a letter to Spotify lawyer Horacio Gutierrez that was shared by BuzzFeed, Apple's legal head Bruce Sewell says Apple is disappointed with the public attacks and concerned that Spotify is asking for exemptions to rules that apply to all app developers. There can be no doubt that Spotify has benefited enormously from its association with Apple's App Store. Since joining the App Store in 2009, Apple's platform has provided you with over 160 million downloads of your app, resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in incremental revenue to Spotify. That's why we find it troubling that you are asking for exemptions to the rules we apply to all developers and are publicly resorting to rumors and half-truths about our service. Our guidelines help competition, not hurt it. The fact that we compete has never influenced how Apple treats Spotify or other successful competitors like Google Play Music, Tidal, Amazon Music, Pandora or the numerous other apps on the App Store that distribute digital music.Sewell goes on to say that Spotify's belief it should not have to pay to take advantage of the "benefits of Apple's hard work" is "simply unfair and unreasonable," pointing out that the App Store rules existed long before Apple Music was introduced. He also points out the new revenue split rules for subscriptions, which will see Apple taking a

Apple Music and NASA Team Up on Short Film and Exclusive Songs Celebrating Juno Mission

Apple and NASA have collaborated on a short musical film [Direct iTunes Link] called "Visions of Harmony," which is designed to celebrate NASA's Juno spacecraft reaching Jupiter's orbit. First launched in 2011, Juno is expected to enter Jupiter's orbit on the evening of July 4, giving us our closest ever look at the gas giant and the secrets hidden beneath its dense cloud cover. Artist's rendering of Juno in Jupiter's orbit, image via NASA According to the new "Destination: Jupiter" section of Apple Music, Apple has collaborated with NASA and the Juno team to offer "education and inspiration throughout the historic journey." "Visions of Harmony" celebrates the link between exploring space and making music, featuring songs from artists like Weezer and Nine Inch Nails frontman and Apple exec Trent Reznor. Reznor and collaborator Atticus Ross created a song inspired by sounds emitted by Jupiter, which features actual recordings from the planet, while Weezer wrote a single called "I Love the USA." Celebrating the intersection of art and science. @AppleMusic x @NASAJunohttps://t.co/LcnGZMwxWG pic.twitter.com/p5JpmaCg82— Apple Music (@AppleMusic) June 30, 2016 Other music featured on Apple's Destination: Jupiter page comes from artists like Corinne Bailey Rae, Quin, Brad Paisley, Zoé, Jim James, and GZA the

Spotify Accuses Apple of Using App Store Approval Process as a 'Weapon to Harm Competitors'

Spotify and Apple are embroiled in a major dispute, which Spotify is today taking to the court of public opinion. Spotify submitted a new version of its app to the App Store, following a decision to eliminate the option to purchase a subscription through Apple, and Apple has rejected the update. In response, Spotify wrote a letter to Apple's legal team on June 26, portions of which have been shared by Recode. Spotify's letter, which it shared yesterday with Congressional staff in Washington, D.C., accuses Apple of causing "grave harm" to Spotify by rejecting the app update. The details on the rejection are somewhat murky, but Spotify claims Apple denied the app update and demanded Spotify use Apple's billing system if it "wants to use the app to acquire new customers and sell subscriptions." Spotify was using its iOS app to highlight a promotion offering new Spotify customers three months of service for $0.99, something Apple didn't like. Apple reportedly forced Spotify to stop advertising the promotion in the iOS app or face the removal of the app from the App Store. Spotify stopped the advertisements, but also decided to stop offering App Store subscription options, a move that's led to the current disagreement between the two companies."This latest episode raises serious concerns under both US and EU competition law," Gutierrez wrote. "It continues a troubling pattern of behavior by Apple to exclude and diminish the competitiveness of Spotify on iOS and as a rival to Apple Music, particularly when seen against the backdrop of Apple's previous anticompetitive

Apple Music Turns One Year Old With 15 Million Subscribers on Board and a Redesign on the Way

Today marks the one year anniversary of Apple Music, which launched in 110 countries on June 30, 2015. The streaming music service was initially limited to the Mac and iOS devices, and it has since expanded to Apple TV and Android. Apple's streaming music service, an evolution of the Beats Music service it acquired in 2014, has steadily gained listeners over the past twelve months, reaching over 15 million paying subscribers as of WWDC 2016 earlier this month. Spotify still remains the world's most popular streaming music service, with roughly twice as many paying subscribers as Apple Music, but the Swedish rival has been available in Europe for nearly eight years and in the U.S. since 2011. Assuming that Apple Music maintains its current pace of growth, it is reasonable to assume that it will eventually eclipse Spotify as the top streaming service worldwide, with Apple Music benefiting greatly from its prominent placement within a default app on iOS and a lengthy three-month free trial to get users hooked on the service. Apple Music has received its share of criticism since launch, partly due to somewhat confusing layouts that can make it difficult to find content and easily manage downloaded or owned content versus streamed content. Apple's "Connect" social feature intended to allow artists to share content with fans also failed to take hold, with many quickly drawing comparisons to the ill-fated "Ping" social network that debuted as part of iTunes in 2010 but was officially canceled just two years later. With iOS 10, Apple is undertaking a reinvention

Senator Elizabeth Warren Accuses Apple of Trying to 'Snuff Out Competition,' Spotify Agrees

Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren today gave a speech where she accused Amazon, Apple, and Google of attempting to "snuff out competition" by locking out smaller companies, reports Recode."Google, Apple and Amazon have created disruptive technologies that changed the world, and ... they deserve to be highly profitable and successful," Warren said. "But the opportunity to compete must remain open for new entrants and smaller competitors that want their chance to change the world again."In regard to Apple specifically, Warren said the company has made it difficult for its rivals to offer competitive streaming services able to compete with Apple Music, presumably through the cut that it takes from streaming services like Spotify when people sign up through the iOS app. To account for Apple's cut, Spotify charges $12.99 to customers who purchase a subscription through an Apple device, which is $3 higher than the $9.99 price tag of Apple Music. While Apple declined to comment on Warren's statements, Spotify's head of communications and public policy Jonathan Prince took the opportunity to lambaste Apple in a statement given to Recode. "Apple has long used its control of iOS to squash competition in music, driving up the prices of its competitors, inappropriately forbidding us from telling our customers about lower prices, and giving itself unfair advantages across its platform through everything from the lock screen to Siri. You know there's something wrong when Apple makes more off a Spotify subscription than it does off an Apple Music subscription and doesn't

Apple Modeling Apple Music Exclusive Content After ‘MTV in its 80s and 90s Heyday’

Apple has consistently been securing exclusive content, like Drake's latest album "Views", Taylor Swift's "The 1989 World Tour" concert film and music videos from The Weeknd and Eminem. In a new feature from Rolling Stone, Larry Jackson, Apple Music's head of original content, said the goal of securing that exclusive content is to put the service "at the intersection of all things relevant in pop culture." Jackson says that the model is "MTV in its Eighties and Nineties heyday. You always felt that Michael Jackson or Britney Spears lived there. How do you emotionally conjure up that feeling for people?"Apple's deals with artists not only include exclusive streaming windows for singles and albums, but funding for music videos. For instance, Drake's "Hotline Bling" music video was funded by Apple, as were two videos for The Weeknd's "Cant Feel My Face" (one of which was not released). The goal is to help artists feel like they can do interesting things with Apple. Monte Lipman, head of Republic Records, home of Ariana Grande and The Weekend, tells Rolling Stone that the Cupertino company has been prepared to do things other companies haven't. "Lately they've been very clever in coming to us with what we consider groundbreaking opportunities," he said. Many of these opportunities include contributions from Apple executives. Tim Cook "weighed in" on the production of M.I.A.'s "Borders" music video while Swift says Jackson helped her brainstorm, make plans for and edit her concert film. That collaboration led to the Apple Music commercial where Swift raps along with

Dreezy's Debut Album to Launch Exclusively on Apple Music

Interscope Records has announced that rising Chicago rapper and songwriter Dreezy's debut full-length album "No Hard Feelings" will be available exclusively on Apple Music in the United States on July 15 before becoming widely available one week later. "No Hard Feelings" will feature 19 tracks, including singles "Body" ft. Jeremih, which has nearly 13.8 million Apple Music streams, "We Gon Ride" ft. Gucci Mane, and "Close To You" ft. T-Pain. The album is available for pre-order today at iTunes.com/Dreezy. Apple Music and Beats 1 have had several exclusives since launching last year. Drake's new album "Views" had a similar one-week exclusivity period with Apple Music in April, while Dreezy's single "Close To You" had its "World First" premiere last week on Zane Lowe's Beats 1 radio show. Apple Music was also first to stream Taylor Swift's "1989" album, although without any exclusivity agreement, while Dr. Dre's "The Chronic" has been an Apple Music exclusive since

Adele's Album '25' Now Available on Apple Music, Spotify, and More

Grammy award-winning singer Adele's latest album, 25, became available on Apple Music and competing streaming services at midnight last night, seven months after its initial release. According to Billboard, the full album can also be found on Spotify, Amazon Prime and Tidal, following months in which only the singles "Hello", "Send My Love (To Your New Lover)", and "When We Were Young" could be found on music streaming platforms. Sony released physical and digital copies of Adele's 25 in November, when it broke the single-week sales record in the U.S., shifting 3.38 million albums. The previous record was set by *NSYNC's No Strings Attached in 2000, which sold 2.42 million copies in its first week. The move comes after reports in November last year suggested that Adele had personally chosen not to share the album on streaming music services. That decision came after Taylor Swift initially refused to share her songs on streaming platforms that offered free tier listening services. Swift later took a stand against Apple when it emerged that the company didn't intend to pay artists during the Apple Music free trial period. But after the company reversed course, she too changed her mind and allowed Apple Music to stream 1989 and her other albums.

Apple Music Preparing for Launch in Korea

Apple Music is gearing up for a launch within Korea, according to a few local media outlets within the country. As reported by The Korea Herald, no firm date has been given for the launch yet, but an official from a music copyright association in Korea confirmed that contract negotiations with Apple have gone through, so the debut is expected sometime soon. “We formed a contract with Apple Music to begin streaming service here,” said an official from Federation of Korean Music Performers. “We made agreements on how to pay the copyright fees to the artists.“ Previous attempts by Apple to introduce the streaming service in Korea failed when similar terms fell through due to strict copyright laws within the country, as well as "a lack of consensus" among local associations like Korean Music Performers. Apple Music's debut still has a few hurdles to surpass before it arrives in Korea, including the formation and signing of contracts with local music organizations like Korea Music Copyright Association and the Recording Industry Association of Korea. The company will also have to create deals with Korea's major record distributors like KT Music and LEON Entertainment, which is the owner of "Korea’s top digital music streaming-download service," called "Melon." Currently, Apple Music is available in over 100 territories including Africa, the Middle East, India, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, the United States, and

iTunes 12.4 Has Apple Music Playback Bug Related to Tracks Shorter Than 60 Seconds

A new iTunes bug has been discovered that causes Apple Music playback issues related to tracks shorter than 60 seconds. MacRumors was able to reproduce the issue on Macs running OS X 10.11.5 and iTunes 12.4.1. Specifically, when an Apple Music track that is shorter than 60 seconds is streamed in its entirety, without skipping ahead, the subsequent song in an album or playlist fails to play and appears to be in a state of perpetual buffering. MacRumors forum member B/D used backend file change monitoring tool fswatch and identified a plausible reason for the bug:It looks like the way Apple Music handles streaming is when the current song is a minute from the end, iTunes signals the next track in the queue to start downloading so that it's ready to play when the current song is over. However, when the song is less than a minute long the next song's download is never initiated, apparently because some "one minute remaining" event is never triggered! This means the app just sits waiting for a download to finish that has in fact never started.The bug only affects tracks streamed through Apple Music, with songs and albums that have been stored locally on iTunes unaffected. The issue was unable to be reproduced on a Mac running macOS Sierra beta, or on iTunes 12.3 or earlier, or on an iPhone running iOS 9.3.2. The bug has been reported to Apple and should hopefully be resolved in a future iTunes software update. Update: The bug was originally shared on the Apple Support Communities by user

Spotify Has Twice as Many Paid Subscribers as Apple Music

Spotify confirmed to The Telegraph today that it now has more than 100 million monthly active users worldwide, including approximately 30 million monthly paying subscribers. Comparatively, Apple services chief Eddy Cue announced at WWDC 2016 last week that Apple Music has 15 million paying subscribers, just two weeks before the streaming music service turns one year old. Apple Music was at 13 million subscribers in April and 11 million subscribers in February, meaning that it has been growing at a rate of about 2 million subscribers every two months. Spotify, which launched in Europe in October 2008 and expanded to the U.S. in July 2011, thereby remains the world's most popular streaming service, but Apple Music is quickly closing the gap. Both services cost $9.99 per month for individuals and $14.99 per month for families, while only Spotify offers a free ad-supported tier. Nevertheless, Spotify recently said that Apple Music has helped, not hurt, its business. Since Apple Music launched on June 30, 2015, its European rival has grown at a faster pace than beforehand. Spotify has now surpassed Skype as the most lucrative European startup, with an estimated valuation of roughly $8.5 billion."It's great that Apple is in the game. They are definitely raising the profile of streaming. It is hard to build an industry on your own," Jonathan Forster, a vice president and one of its first employees, told Reuters in an interview. "Since Apple Music started we've been growing quicker and adding more users than before."Despite rising users and revenues, Spotify continues

iOS 10 Now Requires User Permission to Access Media Library

Apple implemented privacy safeguards on iOS long ago so that when an app requests access to your contacts, calendars, photos, or location, a dialog box pops up asking for express user permission. On iOS 9 and previous software versions, however, that safeguard did not extend to a device's media library. Apple developer Ben Dodson addressed the privacy concern in a blog post in January:I discovered that there is no privacy prompt when a developer tries to access your library. In fact, they can access all of your music data […] This process happens completely silently and in my tests I was able to loop through a library of 10,000 songs, put all the metadata in a JSON file, and upload it to a server in under 2 seconds!Apple acknowledged the issue earlier this year, and it has now introduced a new Cocoa key called NSAppleMusicUsageDescription that developers are required to use in all apps which access the media library on iOS 10 or later. This change ensures that users have to grant express permission for an app to access the music library.NSAppleMusicUsageDescription (String - iOS). This key lets you describe the reason your app accesses the user’s media library. When the system prompts the user to allow access, the value that you provide for this key is displayed as part of the alert. To protect user privacy, an iOS app linked on or after iOS 10.0, and which accesses the media library, must statically declare the intent to do so. Include the NSAppleMusicUsageDescription key in your app’s Info.plist file and provide a purpose string for this key. If your app

CarPlay at WWDC: Rearrange or Hide Apps, Apple Music Makeover, Alternate Routing, and More

While most of the WWDC 2016 keynote was focused on iOS 10, macOS Sierra, and new versions of tvOS and watchOS, Apple also made a number of CarPlay-related announcements during the two-hour presentation. First, the new Apple Maps appearance on iOS 10 and some new features extend to the dashboard. If there is a lot of traffic ahead, for example, CarPlay will now proactively provide you with alternate routes and estimate how much time you saved compared to your original route. Additionally, CarPlay turn-by-turn directions will now be available directly in your instrument cluster in vehicles equipped with a driver-side peripheral screen for a safer driving experience. Another feature that should make CarPlay safer is the Siri SDK. Apple is opening Siri up to developers, enabling third-party apps for VoIP calling and more to work seamlessly with the virtual assistant, and the functionality extends to CarPlay. Siri on CarPlay will support VoIP calls like Skype, which is not yet available in the car CarPlay apps can now be rearranged or hidden on iOS 10 by tapping on Settings > General > CarPlay > Your Vehicle. Simply tap the add or subtract button on the stock or third-party apps that you want to add or remove. Phone, Music, Maps, Messages, Car, and Now Playing cannot be removed. CarPlay apps can now be rearranged or hidden on iOS 10 (Image: 9to5Mac) Just like on iOS 10, Apple Music has received a makeover on CarPlay that makes it easier to browse and discover music. The top menu options have changed from For You, New, Radio, Playlists, My Music, and Now

Eddy Cue and Jimmy Iovine Discuss State of Streaming and Growth of Apple Music

One of the biggest updates announced for iOS 10 centers around the new design of Apple Music, which the company hopes will simplify its music streaming service into one that better introduces its users to new favorite songs, and is less of a hassle to navigate than the current version. To discuss the nuances of the revamped service, Eddy Cue, Jimmy Iovine, Trent Reznor, and Robert Kondrk sat down with Billboard, commenting on the importance of Beats 1, the steady growth of Apple Music, and the much-talked-about slow death of downloaded music in iTunes. Billboard asked Cue and Reznor about a "streaming-only future," but the former reassured fans who prefer to download music by saying that "there's no end date" to paid music services like iTunes, which "is doing very well," Cue said. Reznor admits that such a future is probably inevitable, but doesn't see why paid and streaming music couldn't coexist simultaneously, similar to the niche buyers market of vinyl records today. Eddy Cue: There’s no end date, and as a matter of fact, they should all be surprised and thankful to the results that they’re seeing because our music iTunes business is doing very well. Downloads weren’t growing, and certainly are not going to grow again, but it’s not declining anywhere near as fast as any of them predicted or thought it would. There are a lot of people who download music and are happy with it and they’re not moving towards subscriptions. We talked about subscriptions bringing a lot of new customers in, people who have never bought music. And if you look at Apple’s

Report Insists Apple Will Eliminate iTunes Store Music Downloads in Future

New sources have come forth claiming that Apple is in fact aiming to phase out digital music downloads on iTunes, despite the fact that Apple rep Tom Neumayr specifically stated such rumors were "not true" in May. Speaking with Digital Music News, the insiders said that Apple is simply "keeping their options open" while moving forward, intending to keep a watch on how Apple Music performs in comparison to the digital sales numbers in iTunes. According to the sources, Apple might be gearing up for an iTunes revamp that would introduce software architecture with the ability for the company to "more easily drop iTunes music downloads" down the road. This would allow Apple to subtly shift the service towards the streaming and radio side of things in the event that paid music downloads drop off precipitously. The same sources suggest such a refresh could be discussed at WWDC next week, bringing "harmony" between Apple Music and iTunes while preparing for the potential closure of paid downloads down the line. Sources couldn’t share screenshots or any sensitive information about the upcoming iTunes launch, though a key aspect of the overhaul includes ‘making more sense’ of iTunes music downloads and Apple Music streams. That has been a huge source of confusion for fans, even those that clearly understand the difference between downloading and streaming. But one source noted that Apple is “definitely not getting rid of [music] downloads” at the WWDC event next week, or any time in the short-term future, while another mentioned that possibility that top executives