Apple Music

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Apple introduced the new Apple Music service at its Worldwide Developers Conference on June 8, 2015. Launched in over 100 countries on June 30 as part of iOS 8.4, Apple Music is headlined by a streaming music service priced at $9.99 per month for a single user or $14.99 per month for a family plan of up to six users. The streaming plan integrates access to over 30 million tracks from the iTunes Store with your own music from other sources. Tracks and playlists are available for offline access as well.

Alongside the subscription service is Beats 1, a 24/7 global streaming music channel led by former BBC DJ Zane Lowe. A revamped version of Apple's free iTunes Radio service with a multitude of curated genre-based stations is also included. A third component of Apple Music is Connect, a place for artists to share audio, video, photos, lyrics, and more with fans.

Access to the Beats 1 radio station and Connect is free of charge to all users with an Apple ID, but paying Apple Music subscribers will get certain benefits such as unlimited skipping of radio tracks, access to additional radio stations, the ability to play, save, and like content on Connect, and more.

'Apple Music' How Tos

How to Move Your Playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

We've been experimenting with Apple Music for over a month now, but there are still a few important questions that pop up with the new music streaming service, the first being "How can I import my playlists from Spotify?" The short answer is that you can't without using third-party software. After much research, we've found there are two fairly reliable third-party services that work well. One is called STAMP, and the other is called Move to Apple Music. Both automatically search for and add tracks from Spotify to Apple Music so you don't have to manually go through your entire collection song-by-song. While the end result is pretty much the same, each app offers different features. Before you get started, make sure you are logged into iTunes with your Apple ID and subscribed to Apple Music. With both STAMP and Move to Apple Music, you can download the program from each company's website. Both apps must be given special permission to control your computer.

How to Download Beats 1 Playlists for Offline Listening

Now that you've been testing out Apple Music for about a month, you've probably come across some questions about what else you can do with the streaming music service. We sure have. If you are a fan of Beats 1 but don't want to use up your data listening to Zane Lowe's voice on your commute to work everyday, you can download the playlist from your favorite deejays and listen to their chosen tunes offline for as long as you wish. You can't listen to Beats 1 live in offline mode, but you can access playlists from a deejay's previous radio show similar to the way you would access cable movies and television shows on-demand. Step 1: Find a Deejay The first thing you will need to do is find the deejay playlist you wish to listen to. If you want to find out whom Elton John is listening to, or think Julie Adenuga plays the songs you want to hear, you can find their Beats 1 playlists on their Apple Connect pages by performing a quick search in iTunes while in the Radio tab. The search will usually turn up "X on Beats 1" where X is the name of the deejay. Select that result to see a list of the deejay's playlists. Tracks will be listed by date, so you can easily find the most recent radio show, or even start from the beginning.

Tips for Getting Siri to Play Tracks in Apple Music

If you are signed up for the free, three-month trial of Apple Music, you probably know by now many of the cool features the streaming music service has to offer. But, did you know that Siri can make the experience even better? We've got a few tips for getting Siri to act as your digital deejay. To get the full use of Siri's compatibility with Apple Music, make sure you are subscribed and your iCloud Music Library is on. Play a Radio Station or Beats 1 Not only can Siri play a radio station like Electronic or Oldies, but now the personal assistant can also start playing live Beats 1 programming. Just ask her to "Play Beats 1." Play an Apple Music Playlist One of the things I love about Apple Music is the playlist feature in the For You section. If I've recently "liked" a particular song, A new playlist based on that will show up. If you know the name of an Apple Music created playlist, ask for it specifically. For example, "Play Souxie & The Banshees: Deep Cuts." What Song is Playing If Apple Music is playing a song you don't recognize, you can ask for more information. Just say, "What song is this?" to discover the artist and song title. Add an Album to Your Playlist If you like the song that is playing and want to hear the whole album, ask Siri to add the album to your playlist and it will begin playing after the current track is finished.

Apple Music Tidbits: Nicknames, Playlist Management, and More

Apple's new subscription-based music service launched earlier this week, and even if you've taken advantage of Apple's free three-month trial to see if it is worth your dime and time, there are a few things you may not have discovered yet about its features. While our Getting Started guide gives an overview of how to get up and running, this article gives more details on some of the things you can do with Apple Music and how to make it work for you. If you've noticed any other features we haven't listed yet, feel free to let us know in the forums. Add a Nickname to Your Profile You could stick with your full Apple ID name, or change it to something that fits you better. Apple lets you add a nickname to your ID, which will be displayed on playlists and comments. Nicknames are unique, so the earlier you grab one, the better. On iOS: Open the Music app and tap on any of the main section icons in the bottom toolbar if you're not already on a main page. Tap the silhouette profile icon in the upper left corner of the main screen. Tap your name. Then tap the Edit button to add a nickname. In iTunes: Click on the arrow next to your name, and then click on your Apple ID. Enter a nickname in the fill-in form. Start a Station Based on a Song or Album You can start a new station based on a song or album in either your music library or Apple Music. Tap the three dots next to the song or album to call up additional options. Then, tap "Start Station" on iOS or "New station from artist or song" on OS X to begin listening to tracks.

How to Disable Automatic Subscription Following Apple Music Trial

Apple Music made its worldwide debut in over 100 countries on June 30, with a free three-month trial available for customers to try the streaming music service. Apple requires having a valid payment method associated with your iTunes account to enable the trial, such as a credit card, and both Individual Plan and Family Plan subscriptions are set to automatically renew after the trial. For those that only want to try the Apple Music trial, learn how to turn off automatic renewal below. How to Disable Automatic Renewal Tap on the Account icon in the top-left corner of any tab in Apple Music. Tap on "View Apple ID" and sign into your iTunes Store account. Tap on "Manage" under the "Subscriptions" menu. Tap on your Apple Music Membership, which should currently be "Active." Toggle off "Automatic Renewal" under the "Renewal Options" menu. Confirm the action. Turning off automatic renewal will enable you to try out Apple Music on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch without the streaming music service renewing after the free three-month trial period expires. To reenable a recurring Apple Music subscription, simply follow the steps above and toggle on automatic renewal again. Your settings will also be applied to the iTunes version of Apple Music on Mac and

'Apple Music' Guides

Getting Started With Apple Music and Beats 1 on iOS, Mac and PC

Today marks the official worldwide launch of Apple Music, a subscription-based streaming music service and Spotify rival for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac, PC and, later this year, Apple TV and Android. Apple Music, arguably the company's biggest music initiative since opening the iTunes Store in 2003, requires updating to iOS 8.4 on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch or downloading iTunes 12.2 for Mac and PC. Apple Music Apple Music is an all-in-one streaming music service, live global radio station and social platform for artists to connect with fans. The service costs $9.99 per month, the same price as virtually all streaming music competitors, although Apple is offering a free three-month trial period to encourage customers to try it out. Apple Music is available in over 100 countries, including the United States. Apple Music provides unlimited streaming of almost the entire iTunes Store catalog of music without needing to purchase songs or albums individually. Instead of paying $1.29 per song download, for example, subscribers have millions of songs at their fingertips for essentially the cost of an album. A family plan through iTunes Sharing for up to six members is also available for $14.99 per month. Built into the stock Music app on iOS 8.4 and iTunes on Mac and PC, Apple Music provides side-by-side access to both your downloaded iTunes songs and albums and streaming music library, which should prove to be a more convenient option than third-party apps such as Spotify, Google Play Music and Rdio for most Apple users. Apple succinctly describes it as "the

'Apple Music' Articles

Dreezy's Debut Album to Launch Exclusively on Apple Music

Interscope Records has announced that rising Chicago rapper and songwriter Dreezy's debut full-length album "No Hard Feelings" will be available exclusively on Apple Music in the United States on July 15 before becoming widely available one week later. "No Hard Feelings" will feature 19 tracks, including singles "Body" ft. Jeremih, which has nearly 13.8 million Apple Music streams, "We Gon Ride" ft. Gucci Mane, and "Close To You" ft. T-Pain. The album is available for pre-order today at iTunes.com/Dreezy. Apple Music and Beats 1 have had several exclusives since launching last year. Drake's new album "Views" had a similar one-week exclusivity period with Apple Music in April, while Dreezy's single "Close To You" had its "World First" premiere last week on Zane Lowe's Beats 1 radio show. Apple Music was also first to stream Taylor Swift's "1989" album, although without any exclusivity agreement, while Dr. Dre's "The Chronic" has been an Apple Music exclusive since

Adele's Album '25' Now Available on Apple Music, Spotify, and More

Grammy award-winning singer Adele's latest album, 25, became available on Apple Music and competing streaming services at midnight last night, seven months after its initial release. According to Billboard, the full album can also be found on Spotify, Amazon Prime and Tidal, following months in which only the singles "Hello", "Send My Love (To Your New Lover)", and "When We Were Young" could be found on music streaming platforms. Sony released physical and digital copies of Adele's 25 in November, when it broke the single-week sales record in the U.S., shifting 3.38 million albums. The previous record was set by *NSYNC's No Strings Attached in 2000, which sold 2.42 million copies in its first week. The move comes after reports in November last year suggested that Adele had personally chosen not to share the album on streaming music services. That decision came after Taylor Swift initially refused to share her songs on streaming platforms that offered free tier listening services. Swift later took a stand against Apple when it emerged that the company didn't intend to pay artists during the Apple Music free trial period. But after the company reversed course, she too changed her mind and allowed Apple Music to stream 1989 and her other albums.

Apple Music Preparing for Launch in Korea

Apple Music is gearing up for a launch within Korea, according to a few local media outlets within the country. As reported by The Korea Herald, no firm date has been given for the launch yet, but an official from a music copyright association in Korea confirmed that contract negotiations with Apple have gone through, so the debut is expected sometime soon. “We formed a contract with Apple Music to begin streaming service here,” said an official from Federation of Korean Music Performers. “We made agreements on how to pay the copyright fees to the artists.“ Previous attempts by Apple to introduce the streaming service in Korea failed when similar terms fell through due to strict copyright laws within the country, as well as "a lack of consensus" among local associations like Korean Music Performers. Apple Music's debut still has a few hurdles to surpass before it arrives in Korea, including the formation and signing of contracts with local music organizations like Korea Music Copyright Association and the Recording Industry Association of Korea. The company will also have to create deals with Korea's major record distributors like KT Music and LEON Entertainment, which is the owner of "Korea’s top digital music streaming-download service," called "Melon." Currently, Apple Music is available in over 100 territories including Africa, the Middle East, India, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, the United States, and

iTunes 12.4 Has Apple Music Playback Bug Related to Tracks Shorter Than 60 Seconds

A new iTunes bug has been discovered that causes Apple Music playback issues related to tracks shorter than 60 seconds. MacRumors was able to reproduce the issue on Macs running OS X 10.11.5 and iTunes 12.4.1. Specifically, when an Apple Music track that is shorter than 60 seconds is streamed in its entirety, without skipping ahead, the subsequent song in an album or playlist fails to play and appears to be in a state of perpetual buffering. MacRumors forum member B/D used backend file change monitoring tool fswatch and identified a plausible reason for the bug:It looks like the way Apple Music handles streaming is when the current song is a minute from the end, iTunes signals the next track in the queue to start downloading so that it's ready to play when the current song is over. However, when the song is less than a minute long the next song's download is never initiated, apparently because some "one minute remaining" event is never triggered! This means the app just sits waiting for a download to finish that has in fact never started.The bug only affects tracks streamed through Apple Music, with songs and albums that have been stored locally on iTunes unaffected. The issue was unable to be reproduced on a Mac running macOS Sierra beta, or on iTunes 12.3 or earlier, or on an iPhone running iOS 9.3.2. The bug has been reported to Apple and should hopefully be resolved in a future iTunes software update. Update: The bug was originally shared on the Apple Support Communities by user

Spotify Has Twice as Many Paid Subscribers as Apple Music

Spotify confirmed to The Telegraph today that it now has more than 100 million monthly active users worldwide, including approximately 30 million monthly paying subscribers. Comparatively, Apple services chief Eddy Cue announced at WWDC 2016 last week that Apple Music has 15 million paying subscribers, just two weeks before the streaming music service turns one year old. Apple Music was at 13 million subscribers in April and 11 million subscribers in February, meaning that it has been growing at a rate of about 2 million subscribers every two months. Spotify, which launched in Europe in October 2008 and expanded to the U.S. in July 2011, thereby remains the world's most popular streaming service, but Apple Music is quickly closing the gap. Both services cost $9.99 per month for individuals and $14.99 per month for families, while only Spotify offers a free ad-supported tier. Nevertheless, Spotify recently said that Apple Music has helped, not hurt, its business. Since Apple Music launched on June 30, 2015, its European rival has grown at a faster pace than beforehand. Spotify has now surpassed Skype as the most lucrative European startup, with an estimated valuation of roughly $8.5 billion."It's great that Apple is in the game. They are definitely raising the profile of streaming. It is hard to build an industry on your own," Jonathan Forster, a vice president and one of its first employees, told Reuters in an interview. "Since Apple Music started we've been growing quicker and adding more users than before."Despite rising users and revenues, Spotify continues

iOS 10 Now Requires User Permission to Access Media Library

Apple implemented privacy safeguards on iOS long ago so that when an app requests access to your contacts, calendars, photos, or location, a dialog box pops up asking for express user permission. On iOS 9 and previous software versions, however, that safeguard did not extend to a device's media library. Apple developer Ben Dodson addressed the privacy concern in a blog post in January:I discovered that there is no privacy prompt when a developer tries to access your library. In fact, they can access all of your music data […] This process happens completely silently and in my tests I was able to loop through a library of 10,000 songs, put all the metadata in a JSON file, and upload it to a server in under 2 seconds!Apple acknowledged the issue earlier this year, and it has now introduced a new Cocoa key called NSAppleMusicUsageDescription that developers are required to use in all apps which access the media library on iOS 10 or later. This change ensures that users have to grant express permission for an app to access the music library.NSAppleMusicUsageDescription (String - iOS). This key lets you describe the reason your app accesses the user’s media library. When the system prompts the user to allow access, the value that you provide for this key is displayed as part of the alert. To protect user privacy, an iOS app linked on or after iOS 10.0, and which accesses the media library, must statically declare the intent to do so. Include the NSAppleMusicUsageDescription key in your app’s Info.plist file and provide a purpose string for this key. If your app

CarPlay at WWDC: Rearrange or Hide Apps, Apple Music Makeover, Alternate Routing, and More

While most of the WWDC 2016 keynote was focused on iOS 10, macOS Sierra, and new versions of tvOS and watchOS, Apple also made a number of CarPlay-related announcements during the two-hour presentation. First, the new Apple Maps appearance on iOS 10 and some new features extend to the dashboard. If there is a lot of traffic ahead, for example, CarPlay will now proactively provide you with alternate routes and estimate how much time you saved compared to your original route. Additionally, CarPlay turn-by-turn directions will now be available directly in your instrument cluster in vehicles equipped with a driver-side peripheral screen for a safer driving experience. Another feature that should make CarPlay safer is the Siri SDK. Apple is opening Siri up to developers, enabling third-party apps for VoIP calling and more to work seamlessly with the virtual assistant, and the functionality extends to CarPlay. Siri on CarPlay will support VoIP calls like Skype, which is not yet available in the car CarPlay apps can now be rearranged or hidden on iOS 10 by tapping on Settings > General > CarPlay > Your Vehicle. Simply tap the add or subtract button on the stock or third-party apps that you want to add or remove. Phone, Music, Maps, Messages, Car, and Now Playing cannot be removed. CarPlay apps can now be rearranged or hidden on iOS 10 (Image: 9to5Mac) Just like on iOS 10, Apple Music has received a makeover on CarPlay that makes it easier to browse and discover music. The top menu options have changed from For You, New, Radio, Playlists, My Music, and Now

Eddy Cue and Jimmy Iovine Discuss State of Streaming and Growth of Apple Music

One of the biggest updates announced for iOS 10 centers around the new design of Apple Music, which the company hopes will simplify its music streaming service into one that better introduces its users to new favorite songs, and is less of a hassle to navigate than the current version. To discuss the nuances of the revamped service, Eddy Cue, Jimmy Iovine, Trent Reznor, and Robert Kondrk sat down with Billboard, commenting on the importance of Beats 1, the steady growth of Apple Music, and the much-talked-about slow death of downloaded music in iTunes. Billboard asked Cue and Reznor about a "streaming-only future," but the former reassured fans who prefer to download music by saying that "there's no end date" to paid music services like iTunes, which "is doing very well," Cue said. Reznor admits that such a future is probably inevitable, but doesn't see why paid and streaming music couldn't coexist simultaneously, similar to the niche buyers market of vinyl records today. Eddy Cue: There’s no end date, and as a matter of fact, they should all be surprised and thankful to the results that they’re seeing because our music iTunes business is doing very well. Downloads weren’t growing, and certainly are not going to grow again, but it’s not declining anywhere near as fast as any of them predicted or thought it would. There are a lot of people who download music and are happy with it and they’re not moving towards subscriptions. We talked about subscriptions bringing a lot of new customers in, people who have never bought music. And if you look at Apple’s

Report Insists Apple Will Eliminate iTunes Store Music Downloads in Future

New sources have come forth claiming that Apple is in fact aiming to phase out digital music downloads on iTunes, despite the fact that Apple rep Tom Neumayr specifically stated such rumors were "not true" in May. Speaking with Digital Music News, the insiders said that Apple is simply "keeping their options open" while moving forward, intending to keep a watch on how Apple Music performs in comparison to the digital sales numbers in iTunes. According to the sources, Apple might be gearing up for an iTunes revamp that would introduce software architecture with the ability for the company to "more easily drop iTunes music downloads" down the road. This would allow Apple to subtly shift the service towards the streaming and radio side of things in the event that paid music downloads drop off precipitously. The same sources suggest such a refresh could be discussed at WWDC next week, bringing "harmony" between Apple Music and iTunes while preparing for the potential closure of paid downloads down the line. Sources couldn’t share screenshots or any sensitive information about the upcoming iTunes launch, though a key aspect of the overhaul includes ‘making more sense’ of iTunes music downloads and Apple Music streams. That has been a huge source of confusion for fans, even those that clearly understand the difference between downloading and streaming. But one source noted that Apple is “definitely not getting rid of [music] downloads” at the WWDC event next week, or any time in the short-term future, while another mentioned that possibility that top executives

Apple Launches New Apple Music Fashion Channel Featuring Content Curated by Alexander Wang

Apple has created a new "Apple Music Fashion" channel available to Apple Music subscribers, which features three new Apple Music playlists curated by fashion designer Alexander Wang, among other curated selections from Vogue, Burberry, and more. As shared by Vogue, Wang's playlists, entitled Chill, Hype, and Vibe, feature a mix of R&B slow jams to hardcore rap to "dance-floor ready tracks." Each playlist includes between 15 and 20 songs. "Chill is my go-to playlist when I get home, when I need to decompress, or when I'm having a night in," Wang told Vogue.com of a playlist that includes Rihanna, Drake, and Juicy J. [...] "Hype--those songs are mostly derived from playlists that I've played in a party bus or en route to a festival or going out. They are songs that kick up the energy," he says of a grouping that features Diplo, M.I.A., and Lil Jon. "Vibe is more a playlist that's in between, with songs that have high energy and also are great classics. It's good for having people over, drinks; it's kind of pregame music." There you'll find A$AP Rocky, Rich Homie Quan, and Meek Mill.Wang plans to update the playlists throughout the year with new content so his selections are always up to date. The launch of his playlists are accompanied by a new Apple Music video. New playlists, compliments of @AlexanderWangNY.CHILL. HYPE. VIBE.https://t.co/dRMOXuAw0H#AppleMusicFashionhttps://t.co/OS1acuC8cW— Apple Music (@AppleMusic) June 6, 2016 Wang's playlists and the Apple Music Fashion channel can be accessed by all Apple Music subscribers on iOS devices, Macs, and Android

Apple Debuts New Apple Music Ads Featuring DJ Khaled, Naomi Campbell and Ray Liotta

Apple this weekend debuted new ads for Apple Music, featuring record producer, label executive, and musician DJ Khaled. The ads, which aired following the Apple Music launch of DJ Khaled and Drake's new track "For Free," feature DJ Khaled with Naomi Campbell and Ray Liotta. The first of the two ads, filmed with Naomi Campbell, was shared by DJ Khaled on Twitter. In the spot, DJ Khaled drives Campbell down the Pacific Coast Highway in a Rolls Royce while listening to his new track. Me @naomicampbell in my first @AppleMusic commercial #ForFree w/ @Drake at #1 ONLY on Apple Music NBA Finals 2morrowhttps://t.co/xluWbBZq1W — DJ KHALED (@djkhaled) June 4, 2016 The second ad, featuring Ray Liotta, was shared on the Beats 1 YouTube channel yesterday. In this spot, Liotta and Khaled are in a nail salon getting pedicures while talking about the perks of Apple Music. DJ Khaled first began partnering up with Apple in February, when he launched his We the Best Radio Show on Beats 1 Music. DJ Khaled's "For Free" single is from his upcoming album Major Key, which is also expected to debut on Apple Music. Apple has been heavily promoting Apple Music in recent months, and has featured a series of videos starring Taylor

Spotify Matches Apple Music $14.99 Per Month Family Plan

Spotify has upgraded its family plan to directly match Apple Music's offering, with up to six Premium accounts per family now available for $14.99 a month (via The Verge). Spotify says users under the family plan will receive their own separate premium accounts and have full access to Spotify's library of songs and videos. Existing subscribers meanwhile will automatically be upgraded to the new plan and should receive a lower bill in the next month. The plan rolls out globally today, except for users of the music streaming service residing in Canada. The move follows in the footsteps of Google Play, which matched Apple Music's family plan in December. Earlier this month Spotify claimed it had experienced a faster pace of growth since the launch of Apple Music, reaching 30 million paying subscribers compared to the 20 million it had when the rival service launched last June. In April, Apple claimed 13 million subscribers, up from 11 million users in February. At the beginning of May, Apple introduced a 50% discount for all student subscribers to Apple Music, offering those eligible a $4.99 per month deal. Apple Music is widely expected to see a design overhaul in time for WWDC this year, due to be held June 13–17 in

Apple Confirms Music Deletion Glitch, Says Fix Incoming in Future iTunes Update

Apple today confirmed reports of an issue that causes music from personal collections to be deleted, telling The Loop it only affects a small number of users and that a fix is incoming in an iTunes update next week. “In an extremely small number of cases users have reported that music files saved on their computer were removed without their permission,” Apple said. “We’re taking these reports seriously as we know how important music is to our customers and our teams are focused on identifying the cause. We have not been able to reproduce this issue, however, we’re releasing an update to iTunes early next week which includes additional safeguards. If a user experiences this issue they should contact AppleCare.”Last week, debate raged over the supposed glitch after Vellum's Jake Pinkstone wrote a blogpost complaining that Apple Music had deleted 122 GB of his personal music collection without his permission after he joined the service. The deletion occurred after Pinkstone had his music library scanned by Apple to make his collection available across his devices. Confusion ensued after Pinkstone was told by an Apple Support Representative named Amber that Apple Music's matching system was "functioning as intended." When asked whether Apple Music was supposed to delete his personal music without his permission, Amber responded "yes." Amber's statement, however, was inaccurate according to Apple's own support document. While the causation of the bug is still unknown, as Apple has failed to reproduce the issue, the company's statement suggests Apple has narrowed down

Taylor Swift Dances Like No One's Watching in Newest Apple Music Ad

Taylor Swift this morning tweeted out a new ad for Apple Music, this time showcasing a playlist called "Friday Night Rocks!" recommended to the singer within the For You tab of the music streaming service. The new commercial plays out in a way similar to Swift's previous ad, which saw her lip syncing to Jimmy Eat World as she prepared for a night out. This time, however, she dances around her living room alone to the tune of The Darkness' "I Believe In A Thing Called Love." Dance like no one's watching @AppleMusic @thedarknesshttps://t.co/QfX9l0EXX7— Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) May 12, 2016 After the last ad, Apple Music head of content Larry Jackson confirmed that the company had created a series of commercials with Swift, and would continue a steady rollout of them, akin to the release of singles on a record. Previous Coverage: Apple Music is 'Distractingly Good' for Taylor Swift in New Ad

Apple Aiming to End iTunes Music Downloads in Two Years [Update: Apple Says 'Not True']

Apple allegedly has an aggressive plan to "terminate" music downloads from iTunes within two years, reports Digital Music News citing sources with "close and active business relationships" with Apple. Apple is also rumored to be considering a three to four year timeline for the shutdown of iTunes downloads, but overall discussions with Apple executives are said to focus "not on if, but when" the company should retire music downloads. Termination of music downloads could be staggered by country based on the popularity of streaming content in different regions.Back to the story, the sources indicated that a range of shutdown timetables are being considered by Apple, though one executive noted that "keeping [iTunes music downloads] running forever isn't really on the table anymore." Also under discussion is a plan to "ride the [iTunes music download offering] out for the next 3-4 years, maybe longer," when paid music downloads are likely to be an afterthought in a streaming-dominated industry. [...] According to one source, an initial shutdown could take place in 'tier 1' countries like the United States, UK, and leading countries in Europe and Asia, with 'tier 2' and 'tier 3' countries experiencing a staggered shutdown in subsequent years.The timeline is unclear because Apple's iTunes business continues to bring in hundreds of millions of dollars each year, but it is on the decline due to the rise of streaming music services. According to music industry Mark Mulligan, iTunes music downloads will be worth $600 million in 2019, down from $3.9 billion in 2012. Mulligan

Spotify Growing at Faster Pace Since Apple Music Launched Last Year

Despite the launch of Apple Music, which recently reached 13 million paid subscribers, rival service Spotify told Reuters that it has experienced a faster pace of growth since last June than beforehand."It's great that Apple is in the game. They are definitely raising the profile of streaming. It is hard to build an industry on your own," Jonathan Forster, a vice president and one of its first employees, told Reuters in an interview. "Since Apple Music started we've been growing quicker and adding more users than before."Spotify recently announced that it has 30 million paying customers, compared to around 20 million paid subscribers last June, while its total active user base has grown to nearly 100 million from 75 million a year ago. Apple has not recently disclosed how many users it has on a three-month trial for an overall comparison, but Spotify remains over 2x to 2.5x larger than Apple Music in terms of paid subscribers worldwide."It would be terrible if we were just taking each other's users or to learn there was just a ceiling of 100 million users - I don't think that is the case," said Forster, who had just returned to Stockholm from the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in California.Apple Music has inevitably generated increased awareness of the concept of streaming music, which in turn has helped Spotify triple its paid subscriber base in just two years. The service, which launched in Europe in October 2008 and expanded to the U.S. in July 2011, had 10 million subscribers through May 2014. Spotify continues to operate at a loss due to expensive

Drake's New Album 'Views' Sells One Million Copies in Five Days Under Apple Exclusivity

Although Drake's newest album "Views" was only available on iTunes and Apple Music for one week, under the terms of the company's exclusivity deal with the artist, the album managed to sell more than one million copies in just five days, which The Wall Street Journal calls "a rare achievement in an age of rapid streaming growth and declining sales of downloads and CDs." Most of those sales numbers -- 632,000 copies to be exact -- came within the first 24 hours of release, with the rest trickling over the one million mark in the subsequent days. The figures specifically target sales for the $13.99 iTunes copy of Views, but Apple Music showed some impressive streaming statistics for Drake's new album, as well. In total, Views was streamed more than 250 million times worldwide, 200 million of which were inside the United States, suggesting Apple Music managed to get some of the artist's fans to sign up for the service beyond its current 13 million paid subscribers. The results fly in the face of industry fears that paid streaming services might hasten the continuing decline of music sales, which have fallen by more than 60% in the past 15 years, according to data from Nielsen. While that could still eventually happen, plenty of fans purchased the $13.99 Drake album last week even though they could also access it immediately, along with some 30 million other tracks, by subscribing to Apple Music for $9.99 a month—or even just by signing up for a free trial. As Drake's album launched on April 29, his record label’s parent company, Vivendi SA’s Universal Music

Debate Rages Over Whether Apple Music Automatically Deletes Users' Owned Music Collections

Apple Music is the center of a heated debate this week, with involved parties arguing over whether or not the service is deleting Apple Music users' song collections from hard drives after uploading them to iCloud Music Library. Vellum's James Pinkstone wrote a long complaint on May 4 accusing Apple Music of doing just that. According to Pinkstone, Apple Music deleted 122GB of his original music files after he joined Apple Music and had his music library scanned by Apple to make his personal content available across multiple devices. When I signed up for Apple Music, iTunes evaluated my massive collection of Mp3s and WAV files, scanned Apple's database for what it considered matches, then removed the original files from my internal hard drive. REMOVED them. Deleted. If Apple Music saw a file it didn't recognize--which came up often, since I'm a freelance composer and have many music files that I created myself--it would then download it to Apple's database, delete it from my hard drive, and serve it back to me when I wanted to listen, just like it would with my other music files it had deleted.The process Pinkstone describes above is not how Apple Music's matching feature works, according to an in-depth explanation shared by iMore. Apple will match songs and upload original songs by converting them into an appropriate format, but it does not delete without user intervention. iMore theorizes that Pinkstone accidentally wiped his own library by misunderstanding confusing dialog options. Whatever the case, Apple Music was never designed to delete Pinkstone's source

Apple Music Connect to Be Removed From Music App Tab Bar in iOS 10

Earlier this week rumors suggested that an Apple Music overhaul is being prepared for a worldwide reveal at WWDC this June, with a launch in the fall within iOS 10. New details shared today by 9to5Mac indicate that one of the streaming music service's least-used features -- the social network-like section called Connect -- will be "demoted" in the overhaul and removed from the app's tab bar completely. Although some users have gone through the process of removing Connect already, allowing them a dedicated Playlist tab in its place, iOS 10 will see Apple moving Connect permanently from the bottom tab and into an integrated section of the "For You" page of Apple Music. Because of this, Connect "is unlikely to see notable new features this year," suggesting this section of Apple Music hasn't lived up to the company's plans laid out at WWDC last year. Overall, the new version of Apple Music is said to focus on black and white backgrounds along with an emphasis on individual album artwork in tracklists. Other basic updates include the introduction of Apple's San Francisco font, a new "Browse" tab, lyrics support, and new 3D Touch shortcut previews. Apple Music's streaming radio network, Beats 1, is believed to remain largely the same as it is currently presented in the app. Read More: Eight Months Later, Apple Music Connect Still 'Fails Miserably' at Social

Apple Introduces Apple Music Student Membership Option With 50% Discount at $4.99 per Month

Apple will today introduce an Apple Music student plan that discounts the streaming service by 50 percent for those who are enrolled in an eligible college or university (via TechCrunch). The new plan means any academic student in the United States can now pick up an individual Apple Music membership for $4.99 a month, rather than pay the standard $9.99 subscription rate. U.S. students won't be the only ones to benefit though, as the plan is also open to students in the U.K., Germany, Denmark, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand. The actual cost is expected to vary slightly from country to country, but all markets will see 50 percent off the standard subscription rate. The student discount is offered for up to four continuous or non-continuous years after sign-up, so students are able to take gap years or breaks between semesters and still sign up again when they return to study. Additionally, the plan is open to all students of all ages, regardless of degree. The membership tier will be available starting today to both new and existing subscribers. Students can sign up or change their membership online, or go through the Apple Music mobile app. Apple is using student verification technology provider, UNiDAY, to ensure that those who are signing up as students are actually enrolled at a supported institution. News of the student plan comes two days after it was reported that Apple is planning to overhaul its year-old music streaming service to make it more intuitive. The company is set to redesign the user interface, which will be "bolder, yet simpler",