Siri: Everything You Need to Know

Siri is the voice assistant on Apple devices, equivalent to Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana, and Google's Google Assistant. Siri is available across most of Apple's devices, including iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple Watch, Apple TV, and HomePod.

You can ask Siri all kinds of questions, from simple queries about the weather to more complex questions about everything from sports scores to the number of calories in food. Siri can also enable or disable settings, find content, set alarms and reminders, place calls and texts, and so much more.


This guide covers the basics of Siri, including some of the commands you can use to activate Siri, devices that have Siri included, and devices that support more advanced hands-free "Hey Siri" commands.

Activating Siri


On an iPhone or iPad, Siri can be activated by holding the Home button on compatible models or holding the Side button on devices without a Home button.

On the Mac, you can click on the Siri app icon on the dock or the menu bar, or press and hold the command key and the space bar. On a Mac with a Touch Bar, you can press the Siri icon on the Touch Bar. On 2018 MacBook Air and Pro models or the iMac Pro, you can activate Siri with a "Hey Siri" command.


On the Apple Watch, you can say "Hey Siri" to activate Siri. On Apple Watch Series 3 or later with the latest version of Apple Watch, there's a Raise to Speak feature that lets Siri respond to commands even without the Hey Siri trigger word. Just hold the watch near your mouth and speak. Siri can also be activated by holding down on the Digital Crown.

On first-generation AirPods, a double tap activates Siri, and on second-generation AirPods, Siri can be activated with the "Hey Siri" command.

On HomePod, say "Hey Siri" or press on the top of the HomePod to activate Siri.

On Apple TV, hold down the Siri button on the remote (the button with the microphone) to activate Siri.

Devices Compatible With Siri


Siri is on almost every Apple device, and it's built into macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS. You can activate Siri on Macs running macOS Sierra or later, all Apple Watch models, the fourth and fifth-generation Apple TV, all modern iPhones, the AirPods, and the HomePod.


Devices That Support 'Hey Siri' Without Power


Most Apple devices have support for the "Hey Siri" activation command, but more recent iPads, iPhones, Macs, and Apple Watches offer hands-free "Hey Siri" Siri support even when not connected to power. That means you can use the "Hey Siri" trigger phrase at any time to activate Siri.

Compatible devices are listed below:
  • iPhone 6s and later
  • Second-generation AirPods (iPhone, iPad or Apple Watch connection required)
  • 5th-generation iPad and later
  • All iPad Pro models except the first-generation 12.9-inch model
  • 5th-generation iPad mini
  • 3rd-generation iPad Air
  • All Apple Watch models
  • HomePod
  • 2018 MacBook Pro
  • 2018 MacBook Air
  • iMac Pro
When multiple devices that can respond to "Hey Siri" commands are available, the devices will use Bluetooth to determine which one should respond to the request so not all of them answer at once. According to Apple, the device that heard you best or the device that was most recently raised or used will respond.

If you have a HomePod, the HomePod will often take precedent and respond to "Hey Siri" requests even when other devices that support the feature are nearby.

Countries Where Siri Support is Available


Siri is available in more than 35 countries around the world, including the U.S., UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and many countries in Asia and Europe.

A full list of countries where Siri is available can be found on Apple's Feature Availability website.

Certain Siri features like translations, sports info, restaurant information and reservations, movie information and showtimes, dictionary, calculations, and conversions are limited to a smaller number of countries.

What Siri Can Do


Below is a list of some of the commands and questions Siri is able to respond to, and some of the actions Siri is able to take.
  • Make calls/Initiate FaceTime
  • Send/read texts
  • Send messages on third-party messaging apps
  • Set alarms/timers
  • Set reminders/check calendar
  • Split a check or calculate a tip
  • Play music (specific songs, artists, genres, playlists)
  • Identify songs, provide song info like artist and release date
  • Control HomeKit products
  • Play TV shows and movies, answer questions about them
  • Do translations and conversions
  • Solve math equations
  • Offer up sports scores
  • Check stocks
  • Surface photos based on person, location, object, and time
  • Apple Maps navigation and directions
  • Make reservations
  • Open and interact with apps
  • Find files (on Mac)
  • Send money via Apple Pay
  • Check movie times and ratings
  • Search for nearby restaurants and businesses
  • Activate Siri Shortcuts
  • Search and create Notes
  • Search Twitter and other apps
  • Open up the Camera and take a photo
  • Increase/decrease brightness
  • Control settings
  • Tell jokes, roll dice, flip a coin
  • Play voicemails
  • Check the weather

Siri How Tos



Passive Siri


Siri is an active assistant that you can interact with, but Apple has also integrated Siri into other aspects of iOS and watchOS, allowing Siri to make proactive suggestions that you can act on.

On the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch, Siri can make various kinds of recommendations. When you're running late for a scheduled meeting, for example, Siri might suggest that you call your boss either on the Home screen or when you swipe down to search and access the Siri Suggestions options.


In Messages and Mail, Siri can suggest things like phone numbers or addresses based on what you've typed, and in Safari, Siri can offer up search suggestions. Siri can do other things like suggest HomeKit scenes to activate, suggest a time to leave when you have an event scheduled, suggest events to add to your calendar from your email, and more.

Siri suggestions are all based on your personal device usage habits, so what you see will vary.

There's also a feature in iOS called "Siri Shortcuts," which are shortcuts and automations that let you complete multi-step tasks on your iPhone. Siri Shortcuts are so named because Siri will suggest them to you and because you can activate Shortcuts with a Siri trigger word.



Siri Videos


We've done several videos highlighting different Siri features, and our most recent can be found below.










Siri Privacy


Siri does send data back to Apple, but searches and requests are not associated with your identity to keep your personal information safe.

Apple does not sell your data to advertisers or other organizations, and end-to-end encryption is used for all data syncing between your devices and the cloud.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about Siri, know a feature we left out, or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.


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The iOS 12.2 beta, which was seeded to developers this morning, includes a hidden setup screen that confirms Apple's work on a new version of the AirPods with a "Hey Siri" feature. The new setup screen, which was uncovered by 9to5Mac, indicates AirPods users will be able to activate Siri with a "Hey Siri" command. The currently available AirPods do not support "Hey Siri" functionality, and rumors have suggested Apple is working on a second-generation version. When the second-generation AirPods are available, users will be asked to set up the "Hey Siri" feature when pairing the AirPods to an iOS device for the first time. With "Hey Siri" activated, AirPods users will be able to ask Siri questions without the need to tap on the earphones. Rumors of second-generation AirPods have been circulating for some time, and "Hey Siri" functionality has been an expected feature. Apple itself showed off "Hey Siri" capabilities on the AirPods during the introduction to its September 2018 keynote event introducing new iPhones. The inclusion of the "Hey Siri" setup menu in iOS 12.2 perhaps suggests that we're nearing the release of second-generation AirPods. We've also been expecting second-generation AirPods to feature a wireless charging case to be used with the AirPower, and the delay of the AirPower has presumably led to the delay of the new AirPods. It's not clear if Apple is planning to release an AirPods update without the AirPower, but in recent weeks, we've heard rumors suggesting the AirPower is finally being manufactured, which means we could see a release in

Apple AI Chief John Giannandrea Gets Promotion to Senior Vice President

Apple today announced John Giannandrea, who handles machine learning and AI for the company, has been promoted to the Apple's executive team and is now listed on the Apple Leadership page as a senior vice president. Giannandrea joined Apple as its chief of machine learning and AI strategy in April 2018, stealing him away from Google where he ran Google's search and artificial intelligence unit. At the time, Apple said Giannandrea would lead the company's AI and machine learning teams, reporting directly to Apple CEO Tim Cook. Giannandrea took over leadership of Siri and combined Apple's Siri and Core ML teams. According to Apple's press release announcing the promotion, Giannandrea's team has focused on advancing and tightly integrating machine learning into Apple products, leading to more personal, intelligent, and natural interactions for customers while also protecting user privacy. Apple CEO Tim Cook says that the company is "fortunate" to have Giannandrea at the helm of its AI and machine learning efforts."John hit the ground running at Apple and we are thrilled to have him as part of our executive team," said Tim Cook, Apple's CEO. "Machine learning and AI are important to Apple's future as they are fundamentally changing the way people interact with technology, and already helping our customers live better lives. We're fortunate to have John, a leader in the AI industry, driving our efforts in this critical area."Prior to joining Apple, Giannandrea spent eight years at Google, and in the time before that, he founded two companies, Tellme Networks and