Apple Music

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Apple introduced Apple Music service at its Worldwide Developers Conference on June 8, 2015. Launched in over 100 countries on June 30 as part of iOS 8.4, Apple Music is headlined by a streaming music service priced at $9.99 per month for a single user or $14.99 per month for a family plan of up to six users. The streaming plan integrates access to over 30 million tracks from the iTunes Store with your own music from other sources. Tracks and playlists are available for offline access as well.

Alongside the subscription service is Beats 1, a 24/7 global streaming music channel led by former BBC DJ Zane Lowe. A revamped version of Apple's free iTunes Radio service with a multitude of curated genre-based stations is also included. A third component of Apple Music is Connect, a place for artists to share audio, video, photos, lyrics, and more with fans. Access to the Beats 1 radio station and Connect is free of charge to all users with an Apple ID, but paying Apple Music subscribers will get certain benefits such as unlimited skipping of radio tracks, access to additional radio stations, the ability to play, save, and like content on Connect, and more.

As Apple Music evolves, Apple is turning it into a pop culture hub, with plans to debut multiple original television shows on the service to attract new subscribers and better compete with other streaming music companies like Spotify and Pandora.

'Apple Music' How Tos

How to Prevent Other HomePod Users From Affecting Your Apple Music Recommendations

Apple's HomePod speaker is best enjoyed when linked to an Apple Music subscription, since this allows you to make the most of Siri's enhanced music smarts and its DJ-like role as a personal music curator, or "mixologist", as Apple calls it. As Apple Music subscribers will know, the streaming service learns your music preferences based on what you say and play, which helps it populate the app's "For You" section with new songs that you might like, and enables Siri to generate new playlists on the fly at your request. If you're concerned that other people in your household will skew your Apple Music recommendations by using HomePod to play songs that don't align with your tastes, then there's a setting you'll want to disable as soon as possible. It's called "Use Listening History", and here's how to find it. How to Enable/Disable Your HomePod's Listening History Open the Home app on your iPhone or iPad. Long press on the HomePod icon in your Accessories list. Tap the Details button. Under the "Music & Podcasts" section, toggle on/off Use Listening History. And that's it. By turning off the setting, HomePod will happily continue to play songs from Apple's vast music catalog for anyone who asks, but the songs will be excluded from its personal curation

How to Make an Apple Music Profile to Connect With Friends in iOS 11

Although Apple has fumbled with social network features within its music apps in the past, the company is trying again with an all-new social sharing ability in iOS 11. There's no exact name for the feature, but Apple describes it as a way for you to discover music that your friends are listening to through sharing playlists, artists, and albums on your own personal Apple Music profile. If you already have an Apple Music account with a paid subscription, or if you're taking advantage of the service's free three-month trial period, follow these steps to enable the social sharing features within Apple's streaming music service. Note that this guide is specifically tailored for iOS devices, but the process is similar on macOS. Creating a Profile on Apple Music Open Apple Music. (Note: opening Apple Music for the first time after installing iOS 11 should also give you a direct link to "Get Started" with friend sharing, so jump to Step 5 if you tap this button.) Tap the "For You" tab. Tap your profile picture in the top right corner. Choose "Start Sharing with Friends" and then "Get Started." Upload a profile photo, type in your name, and pick a username so other Apple Music users can find you. Tap "Next" when done. Choose "Everyone" or "People You Choose" to determine who can see your listening history. Choose the playlists to share on your profile, or "Hide all" to show none. Pick contacts to share music with. Toggle on/off "Friends" and "Artists and Shows" to choose what kind of push notifications you want. Tap "Done." If you can't find the

How to Use Apple Music Lyrics in iOS 10

One of the newest features in iOS 10's redesigned Apple Music app is the ability to view lyrics for your favorite songs. While the ability to quickly access song lyrics to learn the lines is helpful, the new feature may get lost in the midst of Apple Music's new look. We've put together a how-to guide to show you how to view lyrics for your songs. First, you'll need to start playing a song. Once a song is playing, click on the song's banner, just above the Apple Music menu bar at the bottom, to open the song's individual card. From here, there are two methods to view lyrics. Method One: Tap the "three dots" button in the bottom right corner. This brings up a menu overlay displaying options for the song, like adding it to a playlist or creating a station. Tap the "Lyrics" button below the "Share Song" option. Songs with available lyrics will have this option displayed, while songs without lyrics available will not. The lyrics will pop up in a separate translucent window that slides over the song window. Method Two: Scroll down while in the song card. The lyrics toggle will be displayed directly beneath the song, right above the "Up Next" feature. Tap on "Show" to reveal the lyrics to your song. Currently, lyrics are not available on all songs and albums, but Apple has been rapidly expanding the number of tracks with lyrics support throughout the beta testing period and coverage has become fairly broad in time for the public

How to Move Your Playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

We've been experimenting with Apple Music for over a month now, but there are still a few important questions that pop up with the new music streaming service, the first being "How can I import my playlists from Spotify?" The short answer is that you can't without using third-party software. After much research, we've found there are two fairly reliable third-party services that work well. One is called STAMP, and the other is called Move to Apple Music. Both automatically search for and add tracks from Spotify to Apple Music so you don't have to manually go through your entire collection song-by-song. While the end result is pretty much the same, each app offers different features. Before you get started, make sure you are logged into iTunes with your Apple ID and subscribed to Apple Music. With both STAMP and Move to Apple Music, you can download the program from each company's website. Both apps must be given special permission to control your computer.

How to Download Beats 1 Playlists for Offline Listening

Now that you've been testing out Apple Music for about a month, you've probably come across some questions about what else you can do with the streaming music service. We sure have. If you are a fan of Beats 1 but don't want to use up your data listening to Zane Lowe's voice on your commute to work everyday, you can download the playlist from your favorite deejays and listen to their chosen tunes offline for as long as you wish. You can't listen to Beats 1 live in offline mode, but you can access playlists from a deejay's previous radio show similar to the way you would access cable movies and television shows on-demand. Step 1: Find a Deejay The first thing you will need to do is find the deejay playlist you wish to listen to. If you want to find out whom Elton John is listening to, or think Julie Adenuga plays the songs you want to hear, you can find their Beats 1 playlists on their Apple Connect pages by performing a quick search in iTunes while in the Radio tab. The search will usually turn up "X on Beats 1" where X is the name of the deejay. Select that result to see a list of the deejay's playlists. Tracks will be listed by date, so you can easily find the most recent radio show, or even start from the beginning.

Tips for Getting Siri to Play Tracks in Apple Music

If you are signed up for the free, three-month trial of Apple Music, you probably know by now many of the cool features the streaming music service has to offer. But, did you know that Siri can make the experience even better? We've got a few tips for getting Siri to act as your digital deejay. To get the full use of Siri's compatibility with Apple Music, make sure you are subscribed and your iCloud Music Library is on. Play a Radio Station or Beats 1 Not only can Siri play a radio station like Electronic or Oldies, but now the personal assistant can also start playing live Beats 1 programming. Just ask her to "Play Beats 1." Play an Apple Music Playlist One of the things I love about Apple Music is the playlist feature in the For You section. If I've recently "liked" a particular song, A new playlist based on that will show up. If you know the name of an Apple Music created playlist, ask for it specifically. For example, "Play Souxie & The Banshees: Deep Cuts." What Song is Playing If Apple Music is playing a song you don't recognize, you can ask for more information. Just say, "What song is this?" to discover the artist and song title. Add an Album to Your Playlist If you like the song that is playing and want to hear the whole album, ask Siri to add the album to your playlist and it will begin playing after the current track is finished.

Apple Music Tidbits: Nicknames, Playlist Management, and More

Apple's new subscription-based music service launched earlier this week, and even if you've taken advantage of Apple's free three-month trial to see if it is worth your dime and time, there are a few things you may not have discovered yet about its features. While our Getting Started guide gives an overview of how to get up and running, this article gives more details on some of the things you can do with Apple Music and how to make it work for you. If you've noticed any other features we haven't listed yet, feel free to let us know in the forums. Add a Nickname to Your Profile You could stick with your full Apple ID name, or change it to something that fits you better. Apple lets you add a nickname to your ID, which will be displayed on playlists and comments. Nicknames are unique, so the earlier you grab one, the better. On iOS: Open the Music app and tap on any of the main section icons in the bottom toolbar if you're not already on a main page. Tap the silhouette profile icon in the upper left corner of the main screen. Tap your name. Then tap the Edit button to add a nickname. In iTunes: Click on the arrow next to your name, and then click on your Apple ID. Enter a nickname in the fill-in form. Start a Station Based on a Song or Album You can start a new station based on a song or album in either your music library or Apple Music. Tap the three dots next to the song or album to call up additional options. Then, tap "Start Station" on iOS or "New station from artist or song" on OS X to begin listening to tracks.

How to Disable Automatic Subscription Following Apple Music Trial

Apple Music made its worldwide debut in over 100 countries on June 30, with a free three-month trial available for customers to try the streaming music service. Apple requires having a valid payment method associated with your iTunes account to enable the trial, such as a credit card, and both Individual Plan and Family Plan subscriptions are set to automatically renew after the trial. For those that only want to try the Apple Music trial, learn how to turn off automatic renewal below. How to Disable Automatic Renewal Tap on the Account icon in the top-left corner of any tab in Apple Music. Tap on "View Apple ID" and sign into your iTunes Store account. Tap on "Manage" under the "Subscriptions" menu. Tap on your Apple Music Membership, which should currently be "Active." Toggle off "Automatic Renewal" under the "Renewal Options" menu. Confirm the action. Turning off automatic renewal will enable you to try out Apple Music on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch without the streaming music service renewing after the free three-month trial period expires. To reenable a recurring Apple Music subscription, simply follow the steps above and toggle on automatic renewal again. Your settings will also be applied to the iTunes version of Apple Music on Mac and

'Apple Music' Guides

Getting Started With Apple Music and Beats 1 on iOS, Mac and PC

Today marks the official worldwide launch of Apple Music, a subscription-based streaming music service and Spotify rival for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac, PC and, later this year, Apple TV and Android. Apple Music, arguably the company's biggest music initiative since opening the iTunes Store in 2003, requires updating to iOS 8.4 on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch or downloading iTunes 12.2 for Mac and PC. Apple Music Apple Music is an all-in-one streaming music service, live global radio station and social platform for artists to connect with fans. The service costs $9.99 per month, the same price as virtually all streaming music competitors, although Apple is offering a free three-month trial period to encourage customers to try it out. Apple Music is available in over 100 countries, including the United States. Apple Music provides unlimited streaming of almost the entire iTunes Store catalog of music without needing to purchase songs or albums individually. Instead of paying $1.29 per song download, for example, subscribers have millions of songs at their fingertips for essentially the cost of an album. A family plan through iTunes Sharing for up to six members is also available for $14.99 per month. Built into the stock Music app on iOS 8.4 and iTunes on Mac and PC, Apple Music provides side-by-side access to both your downloaded iTunes songs and albums and streaming music library, which should prove to be a more convenient option than third-party apps such as Spotify, Google Play Music and Rdio for most Apple users. Apple succinctly describes it as "the

'Apple Music' Articles

Apple Partners With 2018 BRIT Awards, Shares New Apple Music Feature and Playlists

Apple today announced on Twitter that it was the official digital music partner of the 2018 BRIT Awards, which is celebrated each year with a major awards ceremony in London. The 2018 BRIT Awards, which just wrapped up, featured performances from artists like Justin Timberlake, Stormzy, Ed Sheeran, Sam Smith, Liam Payne and Rita Ora, Dua Lipa, and Foo Fighters. To celebrate the BRIT Awards, Apple has a dedicated section in iTunes and the Apple Music app under "Browse" that highlights music from BRIT Award nominees and winners along with exclusive playlists and album compilations. An exclusive live performance from Rag'n'Bone Man is also included in the Apple Music app. Get ready for the biggest night in British music!Experience highlights from 30 years of The BRIT Awards. #BRITs2018https://t.co/6GSNCOpxKJ pic.twitter.com/gnxuAKVlIx— Apple Music (@AppleMusic) February 21, 2018 Stormzy's Gang Signs & Prayer won the award for British Album of the Year, and Stormzy was also named best British Male Solo Artist. The award for best British Female Solo Artist went to Dua Lipa, and Gorillaz was named the best British Group. Dua Lipa was named British Breakthrough, and the Critics' Choice Award went to Jorja Smith. British Single of the Year was Rag'n'Bone Man's "Human," Lorde was named International Female Solo Artist, and Kendrick Lamar was named International Male Solo Artist. Billboard has a full list of winners. The full Apple Music section dedicated to the BRIT Awards is worth checking out if you're looking for a curated selection of playlists and albums

Apple Renews 'Carpool Karaoke: The Series' for Second Season

Apple has renewed "Carpool Karaoke: The Series" for a second season, CBS CEO Les Moonves announced this afternoon (via The Hollywood Reporter). Positioned as Apple's second original TV show after "Planet of the Apps," "Carpool Karaoke: The Series" season 1 debuted last August. "Carpool Karaoke: The Series" is based on the Carpool Karaoke segment made popular by "The Late Late Show With James Corden." Apple's TV show pairs up different celebrities, musicians, athletes, putting them together in a car to sing popular songs. In season 1, featured celebrity pairings included Will Smith and James Corden; Miley, Noah, Billy Ray and the entire Cyrus family; Shakira and Trevor Noah; Game of Thrones stars Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams; Queen Latifah and Jada Pinkett Smith; John Legend, Alicia Keys and Taraji P. Henson; LeBron James and James Corden; and more. "Carpool Karaoke: The Series" was developed by Apple as a way to promote its Apple Music service and to offer exclusive entertainment to Apple Music subscribers. The show aired each Tuesday on Apple Music, and past episodes can be viewed by Apple Music subscribers. It is not yet clear when the second season of "Carpool Karaoke: The Series" might debut, but it could see an August launch much like the first

Apple Expanding Discounted Apple Music Student Subscriptions to 82 New Markets

Apple is expanding discounted student memberships for Apple Music to 82 additional markets, making half price subscriptions available in nearly all regions where the Apple Music streaming service is available. According to iMore's Rene Ritchie, student discounts are available in 79 new regions as of today, with an additional three to be added on February 26. New countries where Apple Music discounts are available for students include Israel, Malaysia, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, and Taiwan. A full list of countries where student memberships can be purchased should is available on Apple's Apple Music availability page. You can also see if your country supports discounted Apple Music subscriptions by checking on the UNiDAYS website. First introduced in 2016, Apple Music memberships for students cut the normal price of Apple Music in half. In the United States, this means the regular $9.99 Apple Music subscription is priced at $4.99 for students. To qualify for discounted pricing, students must be enrolled in an eligible college or university. Student eligibility is determined and verified through UNiDAYs, a student validation service. UNiDAYS confirms that Apple Music subscribers are enrolled in a degree-granting program before allowing customers to get the discounted subscription price. Customers who subscribe to Apple Music with a student subscription will need to confirm their status on a regular basis through UNiDAYS. Subscribers who are no longer students or who have had student pricing for a total of 48 months will be switched over to a full

iTunes Chief Eddy Cue Says Apple Will Share Details on its TV Plans in 'a Little Bit of Time'

Apple iTunes chief Eddy Cue today spoke at Variety's 2018 Pollstar Live event in Los Angeles, California, where he discussed Apple Music and the Music Business with Variety Executive Music Editor Shirley Halperin. Cue's talk wasn't streamed live for viewers at home to watch, but several attendees shared Cue's major talking points on Twitter. Image via Stacey Cohen White Unsurprisingly, some of the discussion focused on the HomePod, which is officially launching this Friday. According to Cue, the HomePod will use its built-in A8 chip and AI algorithms to automatically adjust the bass, treble, and other settings on a song-by-song basis, so there won't be a need for users to fuss with settings. In fact, Apple is confident enough in the HomePod's ability to make these adjustments that there are no built-in options to allow users to manually adjust sound. Cue didn't want to share information about Apple's upcoming original programming plans, despite the fact that the company has inked deals for eight TV shows so far. He did, however, say that we may hear "a lot more" about Apple's plans in "a little bit of time," suggesting Apple will share details on its television goals later this year. Details are light on the other points that Cue covered in his talk, but should more information surface on what he had to say, we'll update this

HomePod Music Streams Don't Count Toward Apple Music and iTunes Device Limits

Yesterday, reviews for the HomePod launched online and with them new details about Apple's smart speaker began emerging ahead of its release date on February 9. One new tidbit of information came from Rene Ritchie's review of the speaker on iMore, which confirmed that any music streamed via HomePod does not count toward an Apple Music subscription's device streaming limit. Additionally, HomePod does not count toward the 10 device limit placed on devices associated with an Apple ID. This means that subscribers with single memberships to Apple Music will be able to ask Siri to play a song on HomePod while listening to music on another iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Prior to HomePod, if single membership users streamed Apple Music on an iPhone and then began listening to music on a Mac, for example, the iPhone would disconnect from the music and serve up a warning about the new stream. #HomePod doesn’t count against any simultaneous device or streaming limits.Set up 10 of them. Leave the house. Listen on your iPhone. Everyone at home can still listen on any/all HomePods.(That part’s glorious.) https://t.co/6u4sQbU5Pm— Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie) February 6, 2018 When users get their HomePods this weekend, it appears that they won't have to worry about the speaker taking up similar streaming limits on their Apple Music accounts. Apple Music family plans already support simultaneous streaming across multiple devices, but the HomePod feature should work the same for those users as well. That includes HomePod not counting against any Apple Music device or concurrent stream

Apple Music Gets New Head of Editorial With Hiring of Music Journalist Alex Gale

Music journalist Alex Gale has been named the new head of editorial for Apple Music, reports Variety. Gale has previously written for sites like Billboard, Complex, XXL, and Vibe. Gale, who will work under Jen Robbins, the director of project management and editorial for Apple, will lead the team that's responsible for all written content on Apple's music platforms, including Apple Music, iTunes, Beats 1, and some video projects. Written Apple Music content appears in interviews, Apple Music features, details on playlists, information on videos, album intros, and more. News of Gale's hiring comes just after Apple announced that Apple Music has grown to 36 million total subscribers around the world, a six million increase from the 30 million the company reported in September of 2017.

NikePlus Members Can Now Earn Apple Music Subscriptions and Exclusive Playlists

NikePlus members can now earn free Apple Music subscriptions and exclusive playlists by completing workouts or purchasing select Nike products. Nike didn't reveal exactly how to unlock the perks, but by achieving various milestones in the Nike+ Run Club or Nike+ Training Club apps in a given month, NikePlus members can earn rewards such as a free one-month Apple Music subscription or access to exclusive Nike playlists that include high-energy mixes. Meanwhile, NikePlus Members who purchase Nike's Epic React Flyknit running shoes in its exclusive White Fusion color will unlock up to four months of free access to Apple Music. The shoes are available for $150 starting today exclusively for NikePlus members in the United States, and on February 22 for non-members. Nike's Epic React Flyknit running shoes in White Fusion colorway NikePlus membership is free, with registration available on the web and through the Nike, Nike SNKRS, Nike+ Run Club, or Nike+ Training Club apps for iPhone. Apple Music is one of three new so-called NikePlus Unlocks, alongside rewards from fitness class startup ClassPass and meditation app

Apple Music Now Has 36 Million Subscribers, Could Eclipse Spotify in United States This Year

Apple Music now has 36 million paying subscribers around the world, an increase from well over 30 million reported last September. Apple confirmed the updated total to The Wall Street Journal, which today reported that Apple Music is growing at a faster pace than Spotify in the United States, and could soon eclipse the service in popularity in the country.Apple's subscriber-account base in the U.S. has been growing about 5% monthly, versus Spotify's 2% clip, according to the people familiar with the numbers. Assuming those growth rates continue, Apple will overtake Spotify in accounts this summer.On a worldwide scale, Spotify maintains a sizeable lead over Apple Music. The streaming music service revealed that it has 70 million paying subscribers a month ago, making it nearly twice as large as Apple Music. Spotify also has a free, ad-supported tier, giving it over 140 million listeners overall around the world. Spotify expanded to the United States in 2011, while Apple Music simultaneously launched in over 100 countries in 2015. In terms of paid subscriptions, both services offer individual plans for $9.99 per month, student plans for $4.99 per month, and family plans sharable with up to six people for $14.99 per month. Apple Music has the benefit of being preinstalled on hundreds of millions of iPhones and iPads. It's also available on Mac, PC, Android, Apple Watch, Apple TV, vehicles equipped with CarPlay, Sonos, and

New Ruling Raises Music Streaming Royalties for Songwriters on Apple Music, Spotify, and More

The Copyright Royalty Board this past weekend ruled on a long-running music streaming royalty case in the U.S., favoring songwriters and music publishers in a decision that increases the royalties paid out by streaming music services by more than 40 percent (via The Wall Street Journal). Now Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon Music Unlimited, Pandora, and other streaming music services will be required to pay 15.1 percent of their revenue to songwriters and publishers, increasing from 10.5 percent. Companies with "less diversified" services like Spotify and Pandora -- which are focused on streaming music -- are predicted to be hit the hardest, while Apple, Google, and Amazon are "unlikely" to be fazed by the ruling. A federal copyright board has raised the music streaming royalties for songwriters and music publishers by more than 40% to narrow the financial divide separating them from recording labels. “Songwriters desperately need and deserve the rate increases,” said Bart Herbison, executive director for the Nashville Songwriters Association International, another trade group. The new royalties will "narrow the financial divide" separating songwriters and publishers from recording labels, although the National Music Publishers' Association estimated labels will still receive $3.82 for every $1 paid to the former group. Before this past weekend's ruling, the trial over music streaming royalties had been ongoing for the past year, igniting after paid streaming music services gained popularity over owning or downloading individual songs and albums. In terms of record

Apple Launches 'Apple Music for Artists' Analytics Dashboard

Apple is debuting "Apple Music for Artists," an analytics dashboard aimed specifically at musicians. The new feature, which was outlined by Billboard, is meant to provide artists and bands with insight into the listening and buying habits of their fans. The dashboard home page offers up an artist's current number of plays, spins, song purchases, and album purchases, with built-in tools able to provide data dating back to June of 2015, which is when Apple Music first launched. An Insights panel available through the dashboard highlights milestones like all time number of plays, purchases of specific songs, and cumulative purchases, while a global map is designed to allow musicians to click on any of the 115 countries where Apple Music/iTunes is available to see purchase history. Data for individual cities is included, such as top songs in each city, with further demographic breakdowns available, and another feature lists all of the Apple-curated playlists where an artist's songs appear. Apple's aim with Apple Music for Artists is to provide more information to independent acts who might not otherwise have access to detailed analytics. Canadian R&B singer Daniel Caesar told Billboard that Apple's analytics dashboard gives smaller artists the tools they need to compete with bigger acts."As a truly independent artist with a small team, music analytics is something we can't do without. We don't have the luxury of deep major label market research to rely on to help us make important decisions like where to perform and how to advertise the things that we make.

Def Leppard Now Available to Stream on Apple Music

Rock band Def Leppard has added its back catalog of music onto Apple Music and other streaming services today, following a years-long "power struggle" with Universal Records over the band's digital song rights. Now, as Def Leppard lead singer Joe Elliott explained to TeamRock.com, new executives at Universal Records have thought differently about the band's streaming catalog, leading to the inking of a deal and the band's music launching today on Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon Music Unlimited, and more. Def Leppard's music is also now available to purchase on iTunes. “We tried to do a deal many years ago, but it didn't work out, so we just waited and bided our time. “Record labels, or any kind of institution like this, keep the same name, but every 18 months you can have totally different people. “We were just very fortunate that the people at Universal at the moment were very onside to doing this deal. We sat down with them and basically just batted the stuff back and forth until we all settled on what we thought was a fair deal.” With the launch on Apple Music, there is now a wealth of Def Leppard content for subscribers to listen to today. On the main "Browse" tab, the streaming service has a new banner for the band, and within that you'll find playlists, albums, live albums, deluxe editions, and other collections. Apple Music also launched an exclusive "The Lost Session" EP today, which includes live versions of songs like "Rock On" and "Bringin' On the Heartbreak," all said to be from a recording session in 2006. Similar to other major artists, the

Jimmy Iovine Dismisses Rumors Suggesting He Plans to Leave Apple

Last week, rumors from several sources suggested Apple Music executive Jimmy Iovine was planning to leave Apple in August following the final vesting of his stock, but Iovine yesterday told Variety that he isn't going to leave the company. Iovine made the comments at the Grammy Museum during a Q&A session held to promote "The Defiant Ones," a documentary about his career and friendship with Dr. Dre. According to Iovine, he is committed to helping iTunes chief Eddy Cue and Apple CEO Tim Cook continue to grow Apple Music and take it "all the way." "I am almost 65, have been with Apple for four years and in 2 1/2 years the [Apple Music] service has gotten to well over 30 million subscribers and Beats has continued its successful run. But there's still a lot more we'd like to do. I am committed to doing whatever Eddy [Cue], Tim [Cook] and Apple need me to do, to help wherever and however I can, to take this all the way. I am in the band."While Iovine did confirm that the final portion of the stock he was granted when Apple acquired Beats will vest in August, he says the bulk of his stock "vested a long time ago." A tiny portion remains unvested, but it's "not what [he] thinks about.""The bottom line is I'm loyal to the guys at Apple. I love Apple, and I really love musicians. That's why those articles annoyed me, because it had nothing to do with reality. It made it out to be all about money."Iovine plans to continue to help the streaming music industry advance, and while he says he'll "eventually" need to slow down, that's not happening soon. His goal is to get

Jimmy Iovine Allegedly Planning to Leave Apple in August [Updated]

Apple Music exec Jimmy Iovine, who works alongside Dr. Dre, Eddy Cue, Robert Kondrk, Trent Reznor and other prominent executives is planning to leave Apple in August, reports Billboard. The rumor about Iovine's alleged departure from Apple first surfaced on music rumor site Hits Daily Double, but Billboard says its sources have confirmed the news. According to Billboard, Iovine's exit will be timed with the vesting of stock he acquired when first joining Apple. Iovine joined the Apple Music team back in 2014, when Apple acquired Beats Electronics and the Beats Music streaming service, both of which were co-founded by Iovine and Dr. Dre. Iovine has had a long history with the company, though, first pitching a subscription music service to Steve Jobs in 2003. Iovine does not have an official title at Apple, but he has been heavily involved in with Apple Music since its 2015 launch and has negotiated many of the streaming deals for the service. Under Iovine's leadership, Apple music has seen strong growth since its debut, with the service now boasting more than 30 million subscribers. Should Iovine leave Apple, it's not clear if he would be replaced, nor what his plans are after departing the company. Bloomberg has confirmed that Jimmy Iovine is planning to leave Apple after he receives the final payout from the Beats Electronics acquisition. Iovine is unlikely to stay on with the company even if he receives a new offer as his vision has "sometimes clashed" with the views of other executives at the company, including Eddy

Apple Highlights Gwen Stefani's Christmas Album in New Apple Music Video

Apple this morning shared a new video on its YouTube channel highlighting Gwen Stefani's Christmas album "You Make it Feel Like Christmas." The one minute animated short features a cartoon Gwen Stefani in an updated version of "'Twas the Night Before Christmas." Santa comes down the chimney and then asks Gwen Stefani to do a Christmas music performance. Stefani's Christmas album was released in October of 2017 and it features 12 Christmas songs, including classics like Last Christmas, Silent Night, Jingle Bells, Santa Baby and Let It Snow. The album is available on Apple Music and iTunes, where it is priced at

Beats 1 Charity Auction Offers Behind the Scenes Studio Tour With Zane Lowe

Apple's Beats 1 Radio division is teaming up with auction site Charitybuzz to raise money for MusiCares through an auction that offers a behind-the-scenes tour of the Beats 1 studio in Los Angeles with Beats 1 DJ Zane Lowe. Described as a one-day internship, the auction provides one winner with a full day at Beats 1, as well as access to a few members of the Beats 1 team. In addition to spending time in studio with Zane Lowe, the auction winner will also get to attend a mentoring lunch with Beats 1 Global Operations Manager and LA Chapter Grammy Governer Julie Pilat. Several other benefits are included as well, like a free pair of Studio3 headphones and the chance to play a song on the Beats 1 radio. A full list of benefits:- One (1) day at Apple Music's live station, Beats 1, which broadcasts to over 100 countries - Time in studio with Zane Lowe during his flagship show, which broadcasts Mondays to Thursdays from 9-11am LA time. - Music Business Mentoring lunch with Beats 1's Global Operations Manager & LA Chapter GRAMMY(R) Governor Julie Pilat. - Attend a Music Meeting and discuss the Beats 1 List with the head of Beats 1's Music Team. You'll get to discover the most exciting new music in the world. - Choose a song and play it, live on the radio, during Beats 1 Request. - Hear your voice on Beats 1! Record a voiceover demo with their Production team. - Go home and listen to Beats 1 with a pair of Beats Studio3 Headphones (colors may vary).The person who wins the auction must visit Beats 1 in LA before December 20, 2018. The auction is valid for

YouTube to Launch Music Subscription Service in March 2018

Apple's streaming music service will soon face another major competitor, as YouTube prepares to launch a paid music service in March of 2018, reports Bloomberg. YouTube has already inked a deal with Warner Music Group and is in talks with Sony Music Entertainment, Universal Music Group, and Merlin, a group of independent labels. The service will allow YouTube to better compete with Spotify and Apple Music, and it will provide more revenue to music labels that have been pushing for more money from the video site. Yet major record labels say the growth would be even more significant if not for YouTube, which they criticize for not compensating them enough, considering how much people use the site to listen to tunes. Music is one of the most popular genres of video on YouTube, which attracts more than a billion users a month.YouTube is referring to its new service as "Remix" internally, and it is said to include Spotify-style on-demand streaming along with YouTube-only elements like video clips. YouTube has already been contacting artists for help promoting the service. According to Bloomberg, YouTube will need to overcome "several hurdles" to meet its March 2018 launch date. YouTube has been stuck in negotiations with Universal and Sony for more than a

Taylor Swift's 'Reputation' Rolling Out on Apple Music

After three weeks of retail and digital download exclusivity, Taylor Swift's latest album -- "Reputation" -- has started rolling out on Apple Music, Spotify, and Amazon Music Unlimited in Australia and other countries, where it is already December 1, suggesting it will come to the U.S., Europe, and other countries as December 1 rolls around. Swift had previously debuted four singles from Reputation on Apple Music, including Look What You Made Me Do, ...Ready For It?, Gorgeous, and Call It What You Want, but she kept the full 15-track album off of Apple Music and other services for the past three weeks. Besides the previously-released singles, there were a few behind-the-scenes videos about the making of Reputation's music videos that were exclusive to Apple Music released a few weeks ago. With the launch, all of this content will be streamable on Apple Music on December 1. In the United States, we can likely expect to see "Reputation" available on Apple Music starting at 12:00 a.m. Eastern Time. UPDATE 📲 #reputation is NOW available for streaming on @Spotify in Australia and New Zealand and will be available in the US tonight at midnight (12am ET on December 1st) 🎶 https://t.co/MgKDbVdzwE pic.twitter.com/p8GGv7RpkY— Taylor Swift Updates (@SimplySFans) November 30, 2017 Swift and Apple have had a somewhat rocky relationship, with the artist in 2015 penning an open letter to Apple Music about the service's initial stance on refusing to pay royalties to artists during the three-month free trial period. Swift opposed this aspect of Apple Music, so she decided to

Apple Music's Jimmy Iovine: 'Streaming Services Have a Bad Situation'

Apple Music executive Jimmy Iovine sat down for an interview recently with Billboard to talk about The Defiant Ones, a four-part documentary series that focuses on the careers of both Iovine and his long-time partner Dr. Dre. During the interview, Iovine commented on the state of the streaming music industry and the precarious position of companies focused solely on streaming music, like Spotify."The streaming services have a bad situation, there's no margins, they're not making any money," he said. "Amazon sells Prime; Apple sells telephones and iPads; Spotify, they're going to have to figure out a way to get that audience to buy something else. If tomorrow morning [Amazon CEO] Jeff Bezos wakes up and says, 'You know what? I heard the word "$7.99" I don't know what it means, and someone says, 'Why don't we try $7.99 for music?' Woah, guess what happens?"Streaming music, says Iovine, is "fine" with major companies like Amazon, Apple, and Google, but it's "not a great business" for standalone companies like Spotify. "They have to figure out a way to show the road to making this a real business," he said. Iovine went on to explain that the record industry doesn't yet know "where technology is gonna go," and that things could shift at any moment with the debut of software and hardware breakthroughs. Referencing the 8-track, cassette tape, and CD, Iovine says companies need to adapt and "figure out their role." According to Iovine, streaming services that offer content for free undermine the music industry and present a major problem that's not something television

Taylor Swift Shares 'Reputation' Behind-the-Scenes Videos on Apple Music

Behind-the-scenes videos for Taylor Swift's upcoming "reputation" album are available exclusively on Apple Music, the singer announced on Twitter today. Three new behind-the-scenes videos available now.Only on @AppleMusic: https://t.co/nNtHaYzZrp pic.twitter.com/a4E6cNaD3B— Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) November 8, 2017 There are several short films available to watch, covering personal footage and set design from the ...Ready For It? video, and a montage of behind-the-scenes footage for Look What You Made Me Do. Apple Music also has music videos available for the two songs. While Swift is sharing exclusive content on Apple Music, rumors suggest her new album will not be immediately available on the streaming service when it launches this Friday. Swift is said to be planning to hold "reputation" from streaming services for at least a week after the album's launch to promote album sales via iTunes and retail stores. At the current time, several singles from the new album are streamable on Apple Music, including "Look What You Made Me Do," "Gorgeous," "...Ready For It?" and "Call It What You Want." The full 15-track album can be pre-ordered on iTunes for

Taylor Swift's Upcoming Album Won't Be Immediately Available on Apple Music and Other Streaming Services

Taylor Swift's new album "reputation" will not be available on streaming music services like Apple Music for at least a week after it launches, reports Bloomberg. Swift's representatives began notifying streaming music services about the upcoming limitation this week. The album reportedly will not be available for streaming during the first week of sales, and companies are still negotiating to determine when exactly it might be made available. "reputation" will be available for purchase in retail stores and online stores like iTunes starting on Friday, November 10. If there is a one week waiting period, it could become available on Apple Music starting on November 17. Swift has been an outspoken streaming music critic, and back in 2015, she wrote a letter to Apple Music executives lambasting the service for initially refusing to pay royalties to artists during the three-month free trial period. Apple changed its policies following her comments, leading to a closer relationship between Swift and the Apple Music team. For a time, Apple Music had exclusive rights to Swift's music catalog after she refused to make her music available on Spotify because of its free ad-supported tier. "I think there should be an inherent value placed on art," she said at the time. Swift later reversed course and allowed her music on non-Apple Music services. With her refusal to release her new album on streaming music services at launch, Swift joins other artists like Adele who have made similar decisions. Adele's "25" was not available on streaming services for months after