Apple Music

Jump to How Tos Guides Articles
Apple introduced Apple Music service at its Worldwide Developers Conference on June 8, 2015. Launched in over 100 countries on June 30 as part of iOS 8.4, Apple Music is headlined by a streaming music service priced at $9.99 per month for a single user or $14.99 per month for a family plan of up to six users. The streaming plan integrates access to over 30 million tracks from the iTunes Store with your own music from other sources. Tracks and playlists are available for offline access as well.

Alongside the subscription service is Beats 1, a 24/7 global streaming music channel led by former BBC DJ Zane Lowe. A revamped version of Apple's free iTunes Radio service with a multitude of curated genre-based stations is also included. A third component of Apple Music is Connect, a place for artists to share audio, video, photos, lyrics, and more with fans. Access to the Beats 1 radio station and Connect is free of charge to all users with an Apple ID, but paying Apple Music subscribers will get certain benefits such as unlimited skipping of radio tracks, access to additional radio stations, the ability to play, save, and like content on Connect, and more.

As Apple Music evolves, Apple is turning it into a pop culture hub, with plans to debut multiple original television shows on the service to attract new subscribers and better compete with other streaming music companies like Spotify and Pandora.

'Apple Music' How Tos

How to Listen to Apple Music on Amazon Echo

If you subscribe to Apple Music and you have an Amazon Echo with Alexa enabled, you can get the smart speaker to play songs, artists, playlists, and more from Apple Music or playlists from your Library. The following steps show you how to set up Apple Music on your Echo device. Keep reading to learn how it's done. (Note that, as of writing, this feature is only available in the U.S.) How to Set Up Apple Music on Amazon Echo Launch the Amazon Alexa app on your iPhone or iPad. Tap the menu icon in the upper left corner of the screen. Tap Settings. Tap Music under Alexa Preferences. Tap Link New Service. Tap Apple Music. Tap Enable to Use. Follow the onscreen instructions to sign in with your Apple ID.Now you've linked the service to your Echo device, say something like "Alexa, play Reggae on Apple Music," or "Alexa, play Lana Del Ray on Apple Music." Make Apple Music Alexa's Default Music Service To avoid having to say "...on Apple Music" each time you ask Alexa to play something, make Apple Music Alexa's default music service by following these steps. Launch the Amazon Alexa app on your iPhone or iPad. Tap the menu icon in the upper left corner of the screen. Tap Settings. Tap Music under Alexa Preferences. Tap Default Services under Account Settings. Tap Apple Music.While Apple Music can be controlled via Alexa, the feature is limited to Amazon's own Echo devices at the current time. In the future, Amazon does plan to expand Apple Music availability to other Alexa-enabled third-party devices.

How to Create Your Own Radio Station in Apple Music

Apple Music offers subscribers several radio station options including its flagship Beats 1 live station, but thanks to Apple's intelligent algorithms you can also create automated, personalized stations on the fly based on the kind of music you like. The following steps show you how to create your own Apple Music station on your iOS device via the Music app, or on your computer using iTunes. Create a Station on Your iPhone or iPad Launch the Music app. Find a song you like, then press and hold on it in the list. If you're already playing the song and the song card is displayed, click the ellipsis (three dots) button in the bottom right of the screen. Select Create Station from the action menu that pops up. A new station based on your song selection will begin playing.Create a Station on Your Computer Open iTunes. Find a song or album you like, then click the ellipsis (three dots) button. Click Create Station. A new station based on your selection will begin playing.These personalized radio stations will feature songs that are similar to the original song used to create them, with songs from the same artist and other similar artists. Any song on Apple Music can be used to create a custom radio station with automatically generated music of the same type, which is a great way to find new music that you like with little effort.

How to Share Songs and Albums With Friends in Apple Music

As an Apple Music user, you can share songs and albums with friends who also subscribe to the streaming service. You can share Apple Music songs and albums over Messages, Mail, AirDrop, and more. This is also the method to use if you want to create a link to share on social networks like Twitter and Facebook. Keep reading to learn how it's done. Sharing Songs and Albums on Your iOS Device Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad. Find the song or album that you want to share. Tap the ellipsis (three dots) button to bring up the action menu. Tap Share Song.../Album... to bring up the Share Sheet and see your sharing options.Sharing Songs and Albums on Your Computer Open iTunes on your Mac or PC. Find the song or album that you want to share. Click the ellipsis (three dots) button to bring up the contextual menu. Hover your mouse pointer over Share Song/Album to see your sharing options.That's all there is to it. On Mac or iPhone, after following these steps, just go on to tap or click the sharing option that you prefer and follow the prompts that Apple provides to select a friend you want to share your music

How to Share Playlists With Friends in Apple Music

As an Apple Music user, you can share Apple Music catalog playlists and playlists you've personally created with friends who also subscribe to the service. You can share playlists through Messages, Mail, Twitter, Facebook, using AirDrop, and more. Keep reading to learn how it's done. How to Share Playlists on Your iOS Device Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad. Find the playlist that you want to share. Tap the ellipsis (three dots) button to bring up the action menu. Tap Share Playlist... to bring up the Share Sheet and see your sharing options. How to Share Playlists on Your Computer Open iTunes on your Mac or PC. Find the playlist that you want to share. Click the ellipsis (three dots) button to bring up the contextual menu. Hover your mouse pointer over Share Playlist to see your sharing options. That's all there is to it. On Mac or iPhone, after following these steps, just go on to tap or click the sharing option that you prefer and follow the prompts that Apple provides to select a friend you want to share

How to Listen to Apple Music on Sonos Speakers

If you subscribe to Apple Music, you can stream the service to any Sonos speakers you own using the Sonos Controller app on your iPhone or iPad. After you add your Apple Music subscription through the Sonos Controller app, you can listen to the entire Apple Music catalog or your personal music library, get music recommendations, and more through your Sonos system. How to Link Apple Music to Your Sonos Speakers Download and install the Sonos Controller app on your iOS device. Launch the Sonos Controller app. Tap the More tab in the bottom right of the screen. Tap Add Music Services in the main menu. Tap Apple Music. Tap Add to Sonos. Log in to your Apple Music account using your Apple ID and password, then tap Open. (If you've left the Sonos app to log in to Apple Music, return to the app and tap Continue to complete the process.)How to play Apple Music on your Sonos Speakers Launch the Sonos Controller app. Tap the Browse tab. Tap Apple Music. Select a song, album, or playlist you want to listen to. Tap Play (or Play All). Tap the mini-player banner at the bottom of the screen. If it isn't already selected, tap your Sonos speaker in the list.Apple Music songs can be played to all of your Sonos speakers at once using the built-in Apple Music feature in the Sonos app. If you have AirPlay 2-enabled Sonos speakers along with other AirPlay 2 speakers, you can also play the same music to all of them at once for a whole-home audio experience, but you'll want to use Apple's Control Center options for that rather than the Sonos app because the Sonos app

How to Listen to Apple Music on the Web

Apple still doesn't offer an official online web player for Apple Music, but if you want to enjoy the streaming service on a computer that doesn't have iTunes installed (your office PC, for example) there is another solution. It's called "Musish," a free third-party web player for Apple Music subscribers, created by software engineer Brychan Bennett-Odlum and his team, Raphaël Vigée, James Jarvis, and Filip Grebowski. To play Apple Music on the web through Musish, you need to sign in using your Apple ID. If you're concerned about account security, don't be -– sign-in is handled in a separate window under the Apple.com domain and Musish doesn't request, log, or gain access to user information. Once you've signed in, you'll see the usual Apple Music tabs on the upper left corner of the Musish interface: For You, Browse, Radio, and My Library. Bear in mind, though, that some categories are slimmed down compared to what you'll find in the native iOS Music app or iTunes. Social features like friend profiles are currently unavailable, for example, and there are no radio features yet. That said, the For You tab features plenty to keep you busy, including your recently played songs, albums in heavy rotation, and personalized mixes, as well as the day's playlists, albums, and new releases. Likewise, the Browse section includes top songs, daily top 100 playlists, top playlists, top albums, and a genres tab. If you're searching for something specific, you can also use the site's upper-right search bar, which remains open on every tab. To play music,

How to Find the Beats 1 Archives in Apple Music

Apple Music's flagship Beats 1 radio station has been running since 2015 and has since broadcast several top DJ shows and multiple live performances by famous artists. If you're a new listener to Beats 1, you'll be happy to know that Apple Music includes an archive of its most popular radio shows and playlists from years past. Here's how you can find them and start listening right away. Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad. Tap the Radio tab. Tap the Beats 1 title, located directly below the On Air show carousel and above Radio Stations. Scroll down past Upcoming Shows, Beats 1 on Demand (a list of previous episodes of currently running shows), Featured Videos and Featured Playlists, and you'll eventually get to the Archive section. Tap a show you like the look of to view a full episode archive. Show archives usually include a show's description along with all its aired episodes and seasons. Tap an episode to start listening, or keep scrolling and below the episode list you'll often also see links to all the playlists featured in the show's lifetime -- to add one to your library, simply tap the +Add

How to Set an Apple Music Song as an Alarm

If you use your iPhone as your alarm clock, chances are it's one of Apple's default alarm sounds that gets you out of bed in the morning. But did you know that you can set any song in your iPhone's music library as an alarm to wake you from your slumber? What's more, if you're an Apple Music subscriber, you can choose almost any song you can think of to be your alarm, so long as it's included in Apple Music's 50-million strong music catalog. Here's how it works. Launch the Music app on your iPhone. Tab the Search tab. Type the name of the song you want to use as your alarm (or type some lyrics if you can't recall the song name). Tap the Apple Music button just below the search field so that it's highlighted red. Fingers crossed you'll see the song in the returned results – tap the plus (+) button alongside it to add it to your music library, then tap the cloud icon that replaces it to download the song to your device. Next, launch the native Clock app on your iPhone and then tap the Alarm tab at the bottom of the screen. Tap the plus (+) button in the upper right of the screen to create a new alarm, or tap Edit in the upper left and then tap an existing alarm from the list that you want to add the song to. Tap Sound. Tap Pick a Song. Under Select Music, tap Songs. Locate and then tap the song that you downloaded to your music library. Tap Back in the upper left of the screen. Tap Save, and your done.That's it! Once you've set a song as your alarm, it'll be played whenever the alarm is set to go off in the morning. You can follow the same steps to

How to Limit How Much Space Apple Music Takes Up on Your iPhone

As an Apple Music subscriber, you're able to download songs, playlists, and albums from the Apple Music catalog to your iPhone or iPad for offline listening, but this can gradually eat up your device's storage space over time. Fortunately the Music app includes a handy feature that can spring into action whenever your device's storage space runs low, and automatically offload songs you haven't played for a while in order to make space for newer ones. It's called Optimized Storage, and here's how you can enable it. Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad. Scroll down to the apps list and select Music. Under Downloads, tap Optimized Storage. Toggle the Optimized Storage switch to the "on" position so that it shows green. Choose a minimum storage amount that you want to keep for music before downloaded songs start being removed from your device.You can also monitor storage space by turning off automatic downloads and making sure to download new songs manually when needed. There's also an option to remove downloaded songs one by one from the Apple Music app if you prefer not to have songs offloaded by Apple automatically.

How to Subscribe to a Friend's Playlist in Apple Music

If you're an Apple Music subscriber, you can download the playlists that your friends on the service have elected to share. Before you can see what your friends are listening to in Apple Music you need to set up your profile and start sharing. Follow the first set of steps below to do so, and then continue onto the second series of steps to view your friends' shared playlists in Apple Music. How to Start Sharing Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad, or open iTunes on your Mac or PC. Select the For You tab. Tap or click your profile picture in the upper right corner of the screen or iTunes window. Tap See What Friends Are Listening to; in iTunes, click Get Started. Follow the steps to set up your Apple Music profile and start sharing. After you've done so, your shared playlists and songs that you listen to will be displayed on your profile page.How to Subscribe to a Friends' Playlist Tap or click the For You tab. Tap or click your profile picture in the upper right corner of the screen or iTunes window. Tap or click your profile picture on the Account page. Scroll down and select one of your friends under Following. If your friend is sharing playlists, you should see them under their profile -- tap or click a playlist to open it. Tap or click the +Add button to add your friend's playlist to your library.Every time your friend adds a song to the playlist, it will be updated with the new content, so this is a good way to effectively subscribe to the music that your friends are listening to.

How to See What Your Friends Are Listening to on Apple Music

If you're an Apple Music subscriber, you can share what you're listening to with friends and see what they're listening to on the streaming music service. Before you can see what your friends are listening to in Apple Music you need to set up your profile and start sharing. Follow the first set of steps below to do so, and then continue onto the second series of steps to follow your friends. How to Start Sharing Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad, or open iTunes on your Mac or PC. Select the For You tab. Tap or click your profile picture in the upper right corner of the screen or iTunes window. Tap See What Friends Are Listening to; in iTunes, click Get Started. Follow the steps to set up your Apple Music profile and start sharing. After you've done so, your shared playlists and songs that you listen to will be displayed on your profile page.How to See What Your Friends Are Listening to To find and follow your friends, open your profile page, scroll to the bottom and tap Follow More Friends, or click Find More Friends in iTunes. If your friends are already sharing music, tap (or click) Follow next to their name. To invite a friend to share, tap or click Invite. Return to the For You tab's first screen and you should see a new Friends Are Listening To section.Once sharing is set up, if you visit your profile in the "For You" section of Apple Music, you can see all of the people you are following and those who are following you, and if you tap a person you can see their listening history. You'll also see recommendations for the songs and albums

How to Transfer Your Spotify Playlists to Apple Music

If you switch from Spotify to Apple Music, you can transfer your playlists from one streaming service to the other using one of several third-party apps available on the App Store. In this article, we're going to use one such app called SongShift to do exactly that, as it's easy to set up and you can test it for free before paying the $3.99 in-app purchase that lets you batch process more than five playlists. Launch the SongShift app on your iPhone. Tap Get Started. Tap the Spotify icon (you can Force touch icons to identify them). Enter your Spotify username and password and then tap Log in. Tap Agree at the bottom of the next screen to grant the app access to your Spotify library. Next, tap the Apple Music icon and then tap Authorize to grant the app access to your Apple Music library and set a token. Tap OK to confirm. Tap Continue. Next, tap the Spotify icon and select a playlist to transfer, then tap Continue. Tap Destination and then select the Apple Music icon. Tap Create New Playlist. In the Configuration screen, tap Destination and enter a custom name for the playlist as you'd like it to appear in your Apple Music library, then tap OK. Tap Process and wait while the transfer or "shift" completes.The "shift" process may take some time and depends on how many songs are in your playlist, but you can start queuing multiple transfers and even close app and they will continue in the background. You can also allow SongShift to notify you when a transfer is complete. Note: You can keep tabs on a playlist transfer by checking the colored dots

How to Search for Songs Using Lyrics in Apple Music

Have you recently found yourself singing some song lyrics only to discover that you're unable to remember the actual name of the song they belong to? As an Apple Music subscriber, you can quickly search the entire Apple Music catalog using just a short lyric phrase, allowing you to find the song in question and add it to your library or your favorite playlist for safekeeping. Here's how it works. Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad. Tap the Search tab. Enter the lyric phrase you can remember into the search field at the top of the screen. Press Search. Press and hold a song in the search results and then tap Lyrics in the action menu pane to view the full song lyrics. Alternatively, tap a song in the list to play it, or tap the plus (+) button to add it straight to your library.Did you know that you can also view the lyrics for your favorite songs as you're playing them back? See our separate how to article for details.

Useful Siri Commands That Work With Apple Music

As an Apple Music subscriber, you can use Siri as a personal DJ to control song playback, queue up songs, find song facts, add songs to your library, play your favorite playlists, or even play something new. Below is a list of Siri commands that will work on any iPhone or iPad with an internet or cellular connection. Simply say "Hey Siri" or press and hold the Side button/Home button on your device to invoke the personal assistant, then ask away. Playback commands "Play some music" "Next/previous song" "Pause this song" "Repeat this song" "Play this song from the start" "Skip this song" "Shuffle songs" Song commands "Play [title] by [artist]" "Play the newest song by [artist]" "Play [radio station]" "Play my favorites mix" "Play something new" "Play more like this" "Play something [mood]" "Play the number one song right now" "Play a live version of this song" "After this song, play [name] by [artist]" "Play the top songs from 1991" "Rate this song five stars" "Add this song to my [name] playlist" "Add this song to my library" "Love this song" Song queries "Who sings this song?" "Who's the drummer in this song?" "When was this song recorded?" "What album is this from?" "What song is this?" or "What's this song?" Have any useful Siri commands that work with Apple Music that we should add to the list? Email us at tips@macrumors.com to let us know.

How to See Song Lyrics in Apple Music

If you subscribe to Apple Music, you can view the lyrics for your favorite songs right from within the Music app on your iPhone or iPad. First, you'll need to start playing a song in the Apple Music catalog or in your library. Once a song is playing, tap on the song's banner just above the Apple Music menu bar at the bottom to bring up the full song interface. From here, there are two methods you can use to view lyrics. Let's go through them individually. Method 1 Tap the ellipsis (three dots) button in the bottom right corner of the screen to bring up the action menu pane. Tap the Lyrics option just above the Love and Dislike buttons. Songs with available lyrics will have this option displayed, while songs without lyrics available will not. The lyrics will pop up over the track screen. Scroll down to view the rest of the lyrics. Method 2 Scroll down while in the full song interface. You should see Lyrics listed directly above the Up Next feature for songs that have lyrics available. Tap Show alongside it to reveal the song's lyrics.Note: If you're in the album view you can long press on a listed track to bring up the action menu pane, where the Lyrics option is also

How to Create a Playlist in Apple Music

In Apple Music, you can easily create playlists and combine music from your own collection with music from the Apple Music catalog. Here's how to do it. Create a Playlist on iPhone and iPad Launch the Music app on your iOS device and find a song that you want to start a playlist with. Long press or 3D Touch on the song. Choose Add to Playlist -> New Playlist. Tap to give your playlist a name, a description, and a cover image if you want. Tap Add Music, and then use the search field to find songs in your library or in the Apple Music catalog, or browse through songs in your collection below. When you find a song that you want to include, tap the plus (+) button next to it. Note that you can do this for multiple songs. Tap Done when you're finished adding songs. Create a Playlist on Your Computer Open iTunes on your computer and find a song that you want to start a playlist with. Click the ellipsis button (the three dots) and choose Add to Playlist -> New Playlist. Click the name to change the title, and click the placeholder cover image to add one. To add a description, click the blue ellipsis button and choose Add Description. Add more songs to your playlist by browsing your library or the Apple Music catalog, or use the search field to find the song you want. When you find a song that you want to add to the playlist, click the ellipsis button and choose Add to Playlist -> [Your New Playlist].You can also import playlists from other people on iTunes by going to File > Library > Import Playlist.

How to Add Photos to Playlists in Apple Music

Once you've created a playlist in Apple Music, adding a cover image of your own is easy. Here's how to do it. Add a Photo to a Playlist on iPhone and iPad Launch the Music app on your iOS device and navigate to the playlist you want to add a picture to. Tap Edit in the upper right corner of the screen. Tap the cover image. Choose Take Photo or Choose Photo from the pop-up menu. Take the photo with your device's camera, or choose a photo from your photo albums. Tap Done. Add a Photo for a Playlist on Your Computer Open iTunes on your computer and click the playlist in the sidebar that you want to add a photo to. Click the main cover image in the playlist. Click Camera in the pop-up pane to take a photo with your computer's camera, or click Other to locate a photo on your hard disk. You can also click Recents to find a recent photo you used or Defaults to select an Apple profile picture. Click Done.

How to Remove Downloaded Apple Music Songs to Free Up Storage Space

Downloading lots of songs or albums from the Apple Music catalog can use up a lot of local storage on your device. Fortunately it's easy to remove downloaded Apple Music content and reclaim the storage space of your devices. Here's how. Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad, or open iTunes on your computer. Find the song or album in your library that you want to remove locally from your device. In the Music app, press and hold the item, select Remove... from the pop-up menu, and then tap Remove Download when prompted. In iTunes, right-click (or Ctrl-click) the item and select Remove Download.Note that if you see the cloud icon next to a song or album, then it's stored in the cloud, not on your device, so it doesn't use any local

How to Add Music to Your Apple Music Library

If you're an Apple Music subscriber, you can add songs, albums, playlists, and video content from the Apple Music catalog to your personal music library. And if you turn on iCloud Music Library on all your devices, you'll see any Apple Music content you add on one device across all of your devices, as long as they're signed in to your Apple ID. To add an individual song from Apple Music to your library, launch the Music app on your iOS device or open iTunes on Mac or PC, navigate to the song, and then tap the plus (+) button next to it. You can also find this button in the lower left corner when viewing the fullscreen playback controls for the song you're currently listening to. To add an entire album, playlist, or music video from Apple Music to your library, launch the Music app on your iOS device or open iTunes on Mac or PC, navigate to the content in question, and then tap the +ADD button next to it. Note that if your device doesn't have a Wi-Fi or cellular connection, you won't be able to listen to any of the Apple Music content in your library. To make it available for offline listening, you'll want to enable Automatic Downloads for Apple Music.

How to Stream Apple Music to an AirPlay Speaker or Apple TV

Whenever you're listening to Apple Music in the Music app, you can quickly stream audio from your iOS device to your Apple TV, HomePod, or any AirPlay-compatible speaker. Bring up the screen showing the currently playing song and then tap the AirPlay icon centrally located at the bottom of the interface. This will being up an audio output panel, where you'll see a list of devices and speakers available to output to. Tap one in the list and the audio should start streaming to the speaker or device almost immediately. If you're listening to Apple Music on an iOS device but you're in another app or on the Home screen, you can quickly access the same AirPlay speaker menu via the Control Center. To open Control Center on an iPad with a Home button, double-tap the Home button; on iPhone 8 or earlier, swipe up from the bottom of the screen; and on a 2018 iPad Pro or iPhone X/XR/XS/XS Max, swipe down from the upper right of the screen. With the Control Center open, simply tap the two curved lines in the upper right corner of the audio playback panel and you'll see the audio outputs available to you. If your iPhone or iPad is locked but Apple Music is playing, you can still get to the same audio output screen –- just tap the AirPlay icon in the upper right of the audio panel. Stream Apple Music on Mac to an AirPlay Speaker If you're listening to Apple Music on a Mac or PC via iTunes, you can easily stream the audio output to an AirPlay speaker or Apple TV. Click the AirPlay icon to the right of the volume slider and you should see a list of available

How to Use Apple Music on Apple Watch

If you're an Apple Music subscriber with an Apple Watch Series 3 or later, you can listen to Apple Music right on your wrist, thanks to the device's automatic access to your music library. Before you start listening to Apple Music, make sure your Apple Watch is connected to a local Wi-Fi network or a cellular connection. You'll also need to pair your Apple Watch with some AirPods or other Bluetooth headphones. Accessing Apple Music on Apple Watch Now, launch the Music app on your Apple Watch, scroll up if necessary and tap Library. Note that you can also ask Siri to play any song in the Apple Music catalog and listen to custom and live stations in your Apple Watch's Radio app. Controlling Apple Music Playback on Apple Watch When you're listening to Apple Music on your Apple Watch or a connected iPhone, your watch screen will show you what's playing, and below that you'll see a number of audio playback controls. Tap the center button to play/pause a song, or tap the buttons either side of it to skip back or forward a track. Turn the Digital Crown on your watch to adjust the audio volume (you'll see the circle around the speaker icon turn green) or tap the speaker icon and tap the plus and minus buttons to adjust volume level. Tap the lower right ellipsis button if you want to delete the track from your library, or if you're listening to an album or playlist, tap the lower left button to access the track list, where you'll also find options to loop the list/song and shuffle the track

How to Customize Apple Music With Loves and Dislikes

When you first subscribe to Apple Music, you're ">asked to provide information about your favorite genres and artists so that it can offer you accurate suggestions and curated playlists as soon as you start using the service. This personalization gradually improves as you continue to use Apple Music, and the best way to influence it is to generously use the Love and Dislike buttons. How to Use Apple Music's Love and Dislike Buttons Next time you're playing a song or listening to a custom-generated or live radio station, tap the ellipsis button at the bottom right of the screen. This brings up an additional options pane, at the bottom of which you'll see Love and Dislike buttons. You can tap either of these, and Apple Music will use your preference to guide its recommendation algorithms going forward. You can also access these buttons to indicate whether you enjoy an album or not. From any album screen, tap the red ellipsis button in the upper right area of the screen. This brings up a smaller pane of options, but you'll still find the Love and Dislike buttons at the bottom. If you're listening to Apple Music on a PC or Mac, you can find the Love and Dislike options in iTunes via the Song menu bar menu. They can also be accessed using a similar ellipsis button that appears in the upper left of the album/playlist window, and at the bottom of the mini player view. Dealing With Inaccurate Recommendations Occasionally, you may find that Apple Music continues to play songs by artists or from genres you've indicated you don't like. This

How to Cancel an Apple Music Subscription

When you subscribe to an Apple Music individual, student or family plan, or take advantage of Apple's free Apple Music trial, your subscription automatically renews every month or every year using the payment information you used when your first signed up to the service. If you want, you can turn off this auto-renewal charge by following the steps below. Note that when you do this, you are effectively canceling your subscription to Apple Music, although you will still be able to access the service until either your trial ends or the month or year that you paid for the service comes to an end. Turn Off Auto-Subscription Renewals for Apple Music Launch the Music app on iPhone or iPad, or open iTunes on a Mac or PC. Tap the For You tab and then tap the account icon in the top right of the screen, or select Account -> View My Account... in iTunes. On iPhone or iPad, tap View Apple ID and then tap Subscriptions, or click Manage next to Subscriptions in the iTunes Account window. On the Subscriptions screen, select your Apple Music Membership . Select Cancel Subscription on the next screen.That's all there is to it. With your subscription cancelled, you won't be charged again when it runs out. If you want to continue your Apple Music subscription after it runs out, however, you will need to reenable payments.

How to Download Songs for Offline Playback on Apple Music

As an Apple Music subscriber, you have the option to download songs, playlists and albums from the Apple Music catalog to your devices for offline listening. This obviously takes up local storage on your devices, but it also means you can still enjoy your music even if you don't have an active internet or cellular connection. Before you can download content from the Apple Music catalog you must turn on iCloud Music Library. Do this now if you haven't already, and then add the content to your library that you want to download. Once that's done, simply follow the steps below. Launch the Music app on your iPhone or iPad, or open iTunes on your computer. Find the song, album, or playlist in your library that you want to download for offline listening. Look for the cloud symbol with an arrow pointing out of it – tap (or click) this icon next to the song you want to download, or tap the same icon next to the album cover image to download the entire album. You can also press and hold on an album cover in your library or a song in an album and select Download in the pop-up menu.If you don't see the cloud icon, it's likely you have Automatic Downloads turned on, which means that content automatically downloads to your device or computer when you add it to your

How to Add Star Ratings to Songs in Apple Music

Apple Music supports a star rating system that allows you to personally rate a song on a scale of 1-5, which is then saved in your library so you can remember and later sort tracks via the ranking system. You can enable star ratings on iOS devices from within the Settings app: tap Music in the apps list and toggle on the switch next to Show Star Ratings. The process required to get to the Rate Song menu is as follows: tap the ellipsis button at the bottom right of the screen when a song is playing to bring up its action sheet, scroll down to Rate Song, choose the star rating, then tap Done. If you're accessing Apple Music via iTunes on your computer, you can add star ratings simply by clicking the stars next to songs and albums. Note: Star ratings don't affect your For You recommendations in Apple Music. To teach the streaming service which songs you enjoy and which you don't, be sure to regularly use the Love/Dislike

How to Customize Your Apple Music Library

Once you've familiarized yourself with the main sections of the Apple Music app, there are a few options that you can customize which can enhance your enjoyment of the streaming service. These are essentially tweaks to the Music app's Library section that can make navigating your music easier. Keep reading to learn what they are. Customize the Library View In the Apple Music app, the top of Library view displays the default headings Playlists, Artists, Albums, Genres, and Downloaded Music, in that order. You can customize the headings that are displayed at the top of your library and use additional headings that aren't immediately obvious. Tap the Library tab, and then tap Edit in the upper right corner of the screen, and you'll see the list of headings expand to include Songs, Music Videos, Compilations and Composers. Tap the boxes next to the headings to include or exclude them. You can also re-arrange the order in which they appear by dragging the bars on the far right. Customize the Albums and Songs Views The Albums and Songs views include several sorting options that you can choose from to make browsing your music library more convenient. Simply tap Sort in the upper right corner of the Album or Songs screen and select Artist, Title, or Recently Added from the pop-up

How to Use Apple Music on Android

Apple Music isn't limited to owners of Apple devices – you can also subscribe to the streaming service on Android phones and tablets, and enjoy the same access to millions of songs, curated radio stations and playlists. You can get the Apple Music app for Android from the Google Play store or download it directly from Apple. Just make sure that your device has Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) or later – you can check which version it has by going to Settings -> System -> About phone. You'll need an Apple ID account to use Apple Music. If you don't have one then you'll be asked to create one when you join. The following steps guide you through the process in the Apple Music app for Android. Launch the Apple Music app on your Android device. You should see a message that says "Welcome to Apple Music." If it doesn't appear, tap For You. Tap the free trial offer. Select a subscription type – Individual, Student or Family are your options. Tap Use Existing Apple ID and enter your Apple ID and password. If you don't have an account, tap Create New Apple ID, then follow the steps. Add a valid payment method if prompted, then tap Join. Accept the terms and conditions.Once you've completed the initial subscription process you've be invited to tailor the service to your interests and likes. Check out our separate article on How to Set Up Apple Music to learn more about how it works. Managing Your Apple Music Subscription on Android If you want to change or cancel your Apple Music subscription on your Android device, follow these steps. Launch the Apple Music app. Tap the

How to Turn on Automatic Downloads for Songs in Apple Music

Normally when you add songs or albums from the Apple Music catalog to your library and then play them back, the tracks are streamed to your device or computer. This avoids using up local storage, but it also has a major drawback –- the content becomes unavailable if you don't have an active internet or cellular connection. Fortunately, you can avoid this situation altogether by enabling Automatic Downloads. With this option turned on, Apple Music content automatically downloads to your device or computer when you add it to your Library. Enabling Automatic Downloads on iPhone and iPad Launch the Settings app on your iOS device. Tap Music in the apps list. Turn on the toggle switch next to Automatic Downloads. Enabling Automatic Downloads on Your Computer Launch iTunes. On Mac, choose iTunes -> Preferences from the menu bar. On Windows, choose Edit -> Preferences from the iTunes window menu bar. Click the Downloads tab, and under Automatic Downloads, check the box next to Music. Click OK.Note that you can download and access the same content on up to 10 devices for as long as your Apple Music subscription is active.

How to Turn On iCloud Music Library for Apple Music

If you're an Apple Music subscriber, you can add and download songs, albums, playlist, and video content from the Apple Music catalog to your personal music library. And if you turn on iCloud Music Library on your devices, the Apple Music content in your library will be synced across all of them as long as they're signed in to your Apple ID. The following steps show you how to enable iCloud Music Library on iPhone, iPad, Mac and PC. Turn on iCloud Music Library on iOS Devices Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad. Tap Music in the apps list. Tap the iCloud Music Library toggle to enable it. If you already have music stored on your iOS device, you'll be asked if you want to keep it. If you choose to Keep Music, the music is added to your iCloud Music Library. If you choose Delete and Replace, the music on your device is removed and replaced with the content in your iCloud Music Library. If you choose Merge, any songs on your device that have a match in the Apple Music Catalog will become available on your other devices. Turn on iCloud Music Library on Mac or PC Launch iTunes on your Mac or PC. On Mac, select iTunes -> Preferences from the menu bar. On PC, select Edit -> Preferences from the iTunes window menu bar. In the General tab, check the box next to iCloud Music Library to enable it. Click OK.Once iCloud Music Library is enabled on iOS devices, the Mac, or the PC, any Apple TV or Android devices you own will also be able to access iCloud Music Library automatically.

How to Sync Albums and Playlists From Apple Music to Your Apple Watch

If you're an Apple Music subscriber and own an Apple Watch, you can sync albums and playlists from the Apple Music catalog to your Apple Watch for offline listening. Once you've added or downloaded Apple Music content to your music library, it becomes available to upload to your Apple Watch, which has 2GB of local music storage. This means you can connect Bluetooth headphones to your Apple Watch and listen to Apple Music tracks without having your iPhone in range. Here's how it's done. Take off your Apple Watch and place it on its charger. On your iPhone, launch the Watch app. Tap the My Watch tab. Tap Music in the app list. Under Automatically Add, tap the toggle switches next to any of Apple Music's personalized mixes to add them to or remove them from your Apple Watch. Under Playlists & Albums, tap Add Music..., then select the playlists and/or albums from your music library to upload to your Apple Watch.Keep your Apple Watch connected to its charger while you wait for the songs to upload and don't remove it until the progress bar completes at the top of your iPhone's screen. Note that you can remove any albums or playlists you've added to Apple Watch by tapping Edit in the upper right corner of the same

How to Set Up Apple Music

One of the best things about Apple Music is its ability to tailor the service to your interests and likes using suggestions and curated playlists. Here's how it works. The first time you launch the iOS Music app you should see a message asking if you want to subscribe to Apple Music. If you've previously dismissed the prompt, tap the For You tab at the bottom of the screen to sign up for the streaming service. iTunes users can find the same For You tab near the top of the iTunes window. Selecting Favorite Artists and Genres After you've followed the initial subscription process, the first thing you'll want to do is select the music genres you're interested in. You'll be presented with a series of bubbles on the screen representing different genres. Tap or click the ones you like and double-tap the ones you love. You can also press and hold on a genre if you don't like it. Tap the reset button to start again if you make a mistake. Once you've finished, you'll be asked to perform the same selection for your favorite artists. It's worth noting that the longer you spend choosing your favorites on these setup screens, the better Apple Music will be at personalizing the service for you as soon as you start using it. You won't get access to the bubble screens again, so if you want instant and accurate suggestions, it may be worth taking your time interacting with them. But don't get too hung up on your selection –- Apple continues to tailor the service to your tastes as you continue to use it. For more information, see check out How to Customize Apple

How to Sign Up for an Apple Music Student Plan

Apple Music is Apple's streaming music service, similar to rival streaming services like Spotify, Amazon Music Unlimited, Google Play Music, Tidal, and others. Apple Music give you access to 50 million songs. Content can be streamed or downloaded for offline play, and there are also song and genre-based radio stations available along with the curated Beats 1 radio station. With a subscription to Apple Music, you can access these songs, radio stations and playlists in the iOS Music app. You can also access your music from other devices signed in to Apple Music using the same Apple ID. A standard Apple Music subscription costs $9.99 per month in the United States, but if you're a qualifying student you can subscribe at the discounted rate of $4.99 per month (student plan prices may show slight variations in other regions and territories). When you join Apple Music as a student, a student validation service called UNiDAYS confirms that you're enrolled in a degree-granting university or college. How to Sign Up to Apple Music Launch the Music app on your iPhone, iPad, or open iTunes on your Mac or PC. You should see an offer to subscribe to Apple Music when you first open the Music app on your iOS device. If you don't, tap For You at the bottom of the screen. In iTunes on Mac or PC, click the For You tab at the top of the iTunes window. Tap or click the three-month trial offer. Note that Apple typically offers one trial per person. Select a College Student or University Student subscription. Tap or click Verify Eligibility. Enter your academic (.edu)

How to Sign Up for an Apple Music Family Plan

Apple Music is Apple's streaming music service, similar to rival streaming services like Spotify, Amazon Music Unlimited, Google Play Music, Tidal, and others. Apple Music give you access to 50 million songs. Content can be streamed or downloaded for offline play, and there are also song and genre-based radio stations available along with the curated Beats 1 radio station. With a family subscription to Apple Music, up to six family members get unlimited access to the entire Apple Music catalog, music recommendations tailored to their personal music tastes, and access to their own iCloud Music Library, allowing them to listen to their music on all of their devices. With iCloud Family Sharing, family members are also able to share their iTunes purchases. An Apple Music family subscription costs $14.99 per month in the United States, with potentially slight price variations in other regions and territories. How to Sign Up to Apple Music Launch the Music app on your iPhone, iPad, or open iTunes on your Mac or PC. You should see an offer to subscribe to Apple Music when you first open the Music app on your iOS device. If you don't, tap For You at the bottom of the screen. In iTunes on Mac or PC, click the For You tab at the top of the iTunes window. Tap or click the three-month trial offer. Note that Apple typically offers one trial per person. Select a Family subscription. Tap or click Use Use Existing Apple ID, then enter your Apple ID and password. If you don't have one, tap or click Create New Apple ID and follow the steps to do so. You may be

How to Sign Up for Apple Music

Apple Music is Apple's streaming music service, similar to rival streaming services like Spotify, Amazon Music Unlimited, Google Play Music, Tidal, and others. Apple Music give you access to 50 million songs. Content can be streamed or downloaded for offline play, and there are also song and genre-based radio stations available along with the curated Beats 1 radio station. With a subscription to Apple Music, you can access these songs, radio stations and playlists in the iOS Music app. You can also access your music from other devices signed in to Apple Music using the same Apple ID. A standard Apple Music subscription costs $9.99 per month in the United States, with slight price variations in other regions and territories. How to Sign Up to Apple Music Launch the Music app on your iPhone, iPad, or open iTunes on your Mac or PC. You should see an offer to subscribe to Apple Music when you first open the Music app on your iOS device. If you don't, tap For You at the bottom of the screen. In iTunes on Mac or PC, click the For You tab at the top of the iTunes window. Tap or click the three-month trial offer. Note that Apple typically offers one trial per person. Select an individual subscription. Tap or click Use Use Existing Apple ID, then enter your Apple ID and password. If you don't have one, tap or click Create New Apple ID and follow the steps to do so. You may be asked to validate your billing information. Add a valid payment method if required and select Join.Apple Music membership automatically renews, but you can cancel renewal at any time

How To Play Music on HomePod When Activating HomeKit Scenes Using Siri Shortcuts

Although HomePod is available in Apple's Home app, the company's smart home speaker as of yet can't be integrated into HomeKit scenes and automations. With such a feature, users would be able to activate their favorite HomeKit scenes, alongside a specific Apple Music playlist, album, or song from their HomePod. Reddit user Running_In_Space on r/HomeKit explained recently that this is actually possible today, thanks to a helpful (and super simple to create) Siri Shortcut. With the Shortcut, you can tie any Home scene together with any Apple Music playlist. While the Shortcut is limited to playlists, you can choose from your own playlists or those created by Apple Music. In the example below, we created a holiday themed Siri Shortcut that turns on Christmas tree lights (connected to an iDevices Switch) and shuffles a holiday playlist any time we say, "Hey Siri, Merry Christmas." Also remember that you'll need an Apple Music subscription, HomeKit-enabled lights or other devices of some kind, and the updated Siri Shortcuts iOS app. How to Create the Siri Shortcut Open the iOS "Shortcuts" app Tap "Create Shortcut" In the search bar, type "Get Playlist" and add it into your Shortcut Next to Playlist, tap "Choose" and pick your desired playlist Search for "Play Music" and add it (here you can also edit settings for shuffling and/or repeating the playlist) Search for "Run Home Scene" and add it Next to Home, tap "Choose" and select your home Next to Scene, tap "Choose" and select your desired scene Before you tap "Done,"

How to Prevent Other HomePod Users From Affecting Your Apple Music Recommendations

Apple's HomePod speaker is best enjoyed when linked to an Apple Music subscription, since this allows you to make the most of Siri's enhanced music smarts and its DJ-like role as a personal music curator, or "mixologist", as Apple calls it. As Apple Music subscribers will know, the streaming service learns your music preferences based on what you say and play, which helps it populate the app's "For You" section with new songs that you might like, and enables Siri to generate new playlists on the fly at your request. If you're concerned that other people in your household will skew your Apple Music recommendations by using HomePod to play songs that don't align with your tastes, then there's a setting you'll want to disable as soon as possible. It's called "Use Listening History", and here's how to find it. How to Enable/Disable Your HomePod's Listening History Open the Home app on your iPhone or iPad. Long press on the HomePod icon in your Accessories list. Tap the Details button. Under the "Music & Podcasts" section, toggle on/off Use Listening History. And that's it. By turning off the setting, HomePod will happily continue to play songs from Apple's vast music catalog for anyone who asks, but the songs will be excluded from its personal curation

How to Make an Apple Music Profile to Connect With Friends in iOS 11

Although Apple has fumbled with social network features within its music apps in the past, the company is trying again with an all-new social sharing ability in iOS 11. There's no exact name for the feature, but Apple describes it as a way for you to discover music that your friends are listening to through sharing playlists, artists, and albums on your own personal Apple Music profile. If you already have an Apple Music account with a paid subscription, or if you're taking advantage of the service's free three-month trial period, follow these steps to enable the social sharing features within Apple's streaming music service. Note that this guide is specifically tailored for iOS devices, but the process is similar on macOS. Creating a Profile on Apple Music Open Apple Music. (Note: opening Apple Music for the first time after installing iOS 11 should also give you a direct link to "Get Started" with friend sharing, so jump to Step 5 if you tap this button.) Tap the "For You" tab. Tap your profile picture in the top right corner. Choose "Start Sharing with Friends" and then "Get Started." Upload a profile photo, type in your name, and pick a username so other Apple Music users can find you. Tap "Next" when done. Choose "Everyone" or "People You Choose" to determine who can see your listening history. Choose the playlists to share on your profile, or "Hide all" to show none. Pick contacts to share music with. Toggle on/off "Friends" and "Artists and Shows" to choose what kind of push notifications you want. Tap "Done." If you can't find the

How to Use Apple Music Lyrics in iOS 10

One of the newest features in iOS 10's redesigned Apple Music app is the ability to view lyrics for your favorite songs. While the ability to quickly access song lyrics to learn the lines is helpful, the new feature may get lost in the midst of Apple Music's new look. We've put together a how-to guide to show you how to view lyrics for your songs. First, you'll need to start playing a song. Once a song is playing, click on the song's banner, just above the Apple Music menu bar at the bottom, to open the song's individual card. From here, there are two methods to view lyrics. Method One: Tap the "three dots" button in the bottom right corner. This brings up a menu overlay displaying options for the song, like adding it to a playlist or creating a station. Tap the "Lyrics" button below the "Share Song" option. Songs with available lyrics will have this option displayed, while songs without lyrics available will not. The lyrics will pop up in a separate translucent window that slides over the song window. Method Two: Scroll down while in the song card. The lyrics toggle will be displayed directly beneath the song, right above the "Up Next" feature. Tap on "Show" to reveal the lyrics to your song. Currently, lyrics are not available on all songs and albums, but Apple has been rapidly expanding the number of tracks with lyrics support throughout the beta testing period and coverage has become fairly broad in time for the public

How to Move Your Playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

We've been experimenting with Apple Music for over a month now, but there are still a few important questions that pop up with the new music streaming service, the first being "How can I import my playlists from Spotify?" The short answer is that you can't without using third-party software. After much research, we've found there are two fairly reliable third-party services that work well. One is called STAMP, and the other is called Move to Apple Music. Both automatically search for and add tracks from Spotify to Apple Music so you don't have to manually go through your entire collection song-by-song. While the end result is pretty much the same, each app offers different features. Before you get started, make sure you are logged into iTunes with your Apple ID and subscribed to Apple Music. With both STAMP and Move to Apple Music, you can download the program from each company's website. Both apps must be given special permission to control your computer.

How to Download Beats 1 Playlists for Offline Listening

Now that you've been testing out Apple Music for about a month, you've probably come across some questions about what else you can do with the streaming music service. We sure have. If you are a fan of Beats 1 but don't want to use up your data listening to Zane Lowe's voice on your commute to work everyday, you can download the playlist from your favorite deejays and listen to their chosen tunes offline for as long as you wish. You can't listen to Beats 1 live in offline mode, but you can access playlists from a deejay's previous radio show similar to the way you would access cable movies and television shows on-demand. Step 1: Find a Deejay The first thing you will need to do is find the deejay playlist you wish to listen to. If you want to find out whom Elton John is listening to, or think Julie Adenuga plays the songs you want to hear, you can find their Beats 1 playlists on their Apple Connect pages by performing a quick search in iTunes while in the Radio tab. The search will usually turn up "X on Beats 1" where X is the name of the deejay. Select that result to see a list of the deejay's playlists. Tracks will be listed by date, so you can easily find the most recent radio show, or even start from the beginning.

Tips for Getting Siri to Play Tracks in Apple Music

If you are signed up for the free, three-month trial of Apple Music, you probably know by now many of the cool features the streaming music service has to offer. But, did you know that Siri can make the experience even better? We've got a few tips for getting Siri to act as your digital deejay. To get the full use of Siri's compatibility with Apple Music, make sure you are subscribed and your iCloud Music Library is on. Play a Radio Station or Beats 1 Not only can Siri play a radio station like Electronic or Oldies, but now the personal assistant can also start playing live Beats 1 programming. Just ask her to "Play Beats 1." Play an Apple Music Playlist One of the things I love about Apple Music is the playlist feature in the For You section. If I've recently "liked" a particular song, A new playlist based on that will show up. If you know the name of an Apple Music created playlist, ask for it specifically. For example, "Play Souxie & The Banshees: Deep Cuts." What Song is Playing If Apple Music is playing a song you don't recognize, you can ask for more information. Just say, "What song is this?" to discover the artist and song title. Add an Album to Your Playlist If you like the song that is playing and want to hear the whole album, ask Siri to add the album to your playlist and it will begin playing after the current track is finished.

Apple Music Tidbits: Nicknames, Playlist Management, and More

Apple's new subscription-based music service launched earlier this week, and even if you've taken advantage of Apple's free three-month trial to see if it is worth your dime and time, there are a few things you may not have discovered yet about its features. While our Getting Started guide gives an overview of how to get up and running, this article gives more details on some of the things you can do with Apple Music and how to make it work for you. If you've noticed any other features we haven't listed yet, feel free to let us know in the forums. Add a Nickname to Your Profile You could stick with your full Apple ID name, or change it to something that fits you better. Apple lets you add a nickname to your ID, which will be displayed on playlists and comments. Nicknames are unique, so the earlier you grab one, the better. On iOS: Open the Music app and tap on any of the main section icons in the bottom toolbar if you're not already on a main page. Tap the silhouette profile icon in the upper left corner of the main screen. Tap your name. Then tap the Edit button to add a nickname. In iTunes: Click on the arrow next to your name, and then click on your Apple ID. Enter a nickname in the fill-in form. Start a Station Based on a Song or Album You can start a new station based on a song or album in either your music library or Apple Music. Tap the three dots next to the song or album to call up additional options. Then, tap "Start Station" on iOS or "New station from artist or song" on OS X to begin listening to tracks.

How to Disable Automatic Subscription Following Apple Music Trial

Apple Music made its worldwide debut in over 100 countries on June 30, with a free three-month trial available for customers to try the streaming music service. Apple requires having a valid payment method associated with your iTunes account to enable the trial, such as a credit card, and both Individual Plan and Family Plan subscriptions are set to automatically renew after the trial. For those that only want to try the Apple Music trial, learn how to turn off automatic renewal below. How to Disable Automatic Renewal Tap on the Account icon in the top-left corner of any tab in Apple Music. Tap on "View Apple ID" and sign into your iTunes Store account. Tap on "Manage" under the "Subscriptions" menu. Tap on your Apple Music Membership, which should currently be "Active." Toggle off "Automatic Renewal" under the "Renewal Options" menu. Confirm the action. Turning off automatic renewal will enable you to try out Apple Music on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch without the streaming music service renewing after the free three-month trial period expires. To reenable a recurring Apple Music subscription, simply follow the steps above and toggle on automatic renewal again. Your settings will also be applied to the iTunes version of Apple Music on Mac and

'Apple Music' Guides

Apple Music: Our Complete Guide

Apple Music is Apple's streaming music service, comparable to other similar streaming services like Spotify, Amazon Music Unlimited, Google Play Music, Tidal, and others. Apple Music boasts access to a total of 50 million songs. Content can be streamed or downloaded for offline play, and there are also song and genre-based radio stations available along with the curated Beats 1 radio station. Apple Music integrates with your existing iCloud Music Library, so you can combine Apple Music songs with songs that you have previously purchased on iTunes all in one unified location. Apple Music's Unique Features All of the streaming services have differences, and with Apple Music, Apple has focused on human curation. While there are some algorithmically created playlists, a lot of the content highlighted on Apple Music is done by Apple Music editors. Apple offers regularly updated personalized playlists in a "For You" tab, including a favorites mix, a chill mix, a friends mix, and a new music mix, along with other playlist options that are updated on a daily basis. Apple Music also often has exclusive album releases, documentaries, and music videos that aren't available on other platforms as a way to lure subscribers. Beats 1, Apple Music's 24/7 live radio station, is also one of the service's most unique features. It features songs curated by DJs along with a multitude of special shows, sometimes created by artists. What's Included in a Subscription Unlimited access to Apple Music songs on demand Personalized algorithmic playlists Curated

Apple Music vs. Amazon Music Unlimited

Apple Music has become immensely popular since it launched in 2015, and now has over 56 million subscribers worldwide. So how does it stack up against ecommerce giant Amazon's rival premium streaming service in terms of features, music catalog, and cost? Keep reading to find out. Amazon actually has two music services, so before we go any further it's worth explaining the difference. If you have an Amazon Prime membership, you already have access to Amazon Prime Music, as it's bundled in with the service. In fact, Prime Music and Amazon Music Unlimited are similar in many ways, so if you are a Prime member and you're interested in Amazon's standalone streaming service then it's worth getting to know Prime Music first. Both services share the same interface and apps, and offer similar features like the ability to download songs, albums and playlists for offline listening. The main difference between the two offerings is the number of songs you have access to. Amazon Prime Music has two million songs in its catalog, but paying the extra for Amazon Music Unlimited gets you access to 50 million songs, including the majority of new releases. Subscriptions and Plans An individual Apple Music subscription costs $9.99 per month in the United States, with slight price variations in other countries and territories. Membership means you can stream Apple's music catalog, download music and videos for offline listening, and get access to new releases and exclusives, as well as a back catalog of shows broadcast on Apple's Beats 1 radio station. The price you pay for an

Apple Music vs. Tidal

Apple Music and Tidal are well known for their exclusive releases and both streaming services have been around since 2015. In that time, Apple Music has become the most popular streaming service in the US, but Tidal has a dedicated subscriber base for a variety of reasons. Dubbed as the artists' music platform, Tidal is owned by Jay-Z and a variety of other successful music artists, and the company makes a point of paying artists more per stream than Apple Music. But is it a better service for the average listener? Read on to learn what both have to offer. Subscriptions and Plans An individual Apple Music subscription costs $9.99 per month in the United States, with slight price variations in other countries and territories. Membership means you can stream Apple's music catalog, download music and videos for offline listening, and get exclusive access to new releases and exclusives, as well as a back catalog of shows broadcast on Apple's Beats 1 radio station. Tidal also offers a $9.99 per month individual subscription, although again prices may vary in other regions. For the audiophiles out there, Tidal also offers a $19.99 per month individual subscription with lossless "High Fidelity" sound quality and high definition videos. Apple Music price plans An Apple Music student subscription costs $4.99 and requires you to sign up using your educational institution credentials. Tidal offers two student plans: $4.99 for the Premium service and $9.99 for the HiFi service. Note that students need to re-verify their eligibility every 12 months for both services.

Apple Music vs. Google Play Music

Need help deciding whether Apple or Google has the right music streaming service for you? Then keep reading. Apple Music launched in 2015 and was a relative latecomer to the streaming services market, but Apple's continual development of the platform has made it into one of the most popular choices for enjoying digital music. Google's music strategy on the other hand has been confusing in recent years, so before we dive in with a deeper look at the two streaming service rivals, here's a quick recap. Google Music Google launched its original Play Music streaming service in 2011. Like Apple Music, Play Music gives you access to a vast music library, music recommendations, radio stations, and offline listening, all for a monthly fee. In a unique contribution to the streaming services field, Google Play Music also lets all Google account holders (i.e. not just subscribers) upload up to 50,000 tracks from their existing music library to the cloud, for storage and online streaming. In May 2017, Google launched an on-demand ad-supported music streaming service called YouTube Music, shortly followed by YouTube Music Premium – a revamped version of its ad-free YouTube Red subscription service with a renewed focus on original programming. The rebranded service includes personalized playlists, intelligent search, support for background playback on mobile and music downloads for offline listening. It also offers access to remixes, covers and live versions that aren't available on other platforms. Initially Google said its new YouTube Music service would replace Google

Apple Music vs. Spotify

Apple Music and Spotify are the biggest players in the music streaming space -- and for good reason. Spotify essentially created the market as it exists today and has millions more users globally than any other service, but Apple Music is catching up, thanks to its deep integration in Apple's popular iOS ecosystem. Both Spotify and Apple Music offer as much music and related content as your ears could handle – including exclusive new releases from top artists – and all of it can be streamed ad-free (with Spotify's paid tier) or downloaded for offline play. So which is the best option for you? Keep reading as we pit the two services against each other. Subscriptions and Price Plans An individual Apple Music subscription costs $9.99 per month in the United States, with slight price variations in other countries and territories. Likewise, an individual Spotify subscription or "Premium" plan costs $9.99 per month, with some regional variations. In addition to its paid plan, Spotify also offers a free ad-supported service that allows users to shuffle-play songs, although premium features remain off limits. Both services offer student and family plans for $4.99 per month and $14.99 per month, respectively. Spotify's student offering currently includes additional access to an ad-supported Hulu TV plan and unlimited access to the SHOWTIME streaming service. Apple Music and Spotify family plans meanwhile are very similar. Up to six people can access the services using a personal account for each family member, with the exception that Apple Music members can also

'Apple Music' Articles

Billie Eilish Breaks Apple Music Record for Most Users Pre-Adding Upcoming Album to Their Libraries

Artist Billie Eilish has achieved a new streaming milestone on Apple Music, breaking the service's all-time record for users "pre-adding" an album to their libraries ahead of its release. According to Apple, Eilish's upcoming album "When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?" has earned more than 800,000 pre-adds on Apple Music ahead of the album's launch on March 29 (via Music Business Worldwide). By pre-adding an album, subscribers can save it in their Apple Music libraries and listen to any songs that may already be out for it. Then, when the full album is released Apple adds the entire album to their account. Although this process can be unreliable on Apple Music, and sometimes the full album isn't added at the time of its release, Apple Music executive Oliver Schusser sees pre-adds as a sort of modern pre-order feature for the streaming era. Schusser said that, "While most services focus the majority of their efforts around playlists, Apple Music still emphasizes albums because we understand their value as a storytelling tool for artists to create context around their music." “To that end, pre-adds are great early indicators of engagement around an artist and the intention of the fans. To actively pre-add an album, much like the pre-order we invented with iTunes, means that the fan is excited about the content and wants to be among the first to enjoy it the moment its available. That kind of engagement is very valuable to an artist and to us.” He added: “For Billie in particular

Apple Music Updates 'Browse' Tab With New Themed Sections

Apple Music recently updated the New Music section of the "Browse" tab with a small refresh that highlights an assortment of different playlists from various musical genres. Apple sometimes pushes silent updates to Apple Music, like last summer when it added a "Coming Soon" section, more specific launch dates for albums, and updated artist profiles. Now, in the central Browse tab of Apple Music, you'll find Apple's "Daily Top 100" playlist featured prominently at the top of the section, just below the traditional carousel of new music. These Global Top 100 playlists launched last September and have been available to listen to by navigating to Browse, scrolling down, and finding the Top Charts area. Now, they're much easier to find right at the top of Browse. The section under Daily Top 100 is "Weekend Warrior," a list of pop, dance, hip-hop, country, and more music all centered around celebrating the weekend. Just like the Daily Top 100, these playlists have all been available in Apple Music before, but the service's organization and presentation of them is new. Slightly lower in Browse you can now find an area that features "Just Updated" playlists across genres and moods. The rest of Browse looks mostly the same, with Hot Tracks and New Music showcasing the most popular new songs on the service. Near the bottom of the tab are a few more changes, including a "We're Loving" area that features new album recommendations from the Apple Music editors, and a "Get Down Tonight" section curating dance music.

Apple Music Now Available on Amazon Fire TV

Amazon today expanded its Apple Music integration to the Amazon Fire TV, allowing Fire TV owners to ask Alexa to play songs from the Apple Music service. According to CNBC, Apple Music on the Amazon Fire TV is available starting today. The expansion comes three months after Apple allowed Apple Music to be streamed on Amazon Echo speakers using the Alexa voice assistant. On the Fire TV, users can use commands like "Alexa, play music by Stevie Nicks," or "Alexa, play a Fleetwood Mac album" to play content directly from Apple Music. It can be enabled by going to the Alexa app on an Android or iOS device and activating the Apple Music skill. Those who have already set up Apple Music with Alexa for Echo devices will not need to repeat the steps. Right now, Apple Music is limited to the Fire TV and Amazon Echo speakers, though it may be expanded to third-party Alexa devices in the future. Apple's effort to allow Apple Music to be streamed on third-party platforms is part of a deeper push to grow services revenue. Apple is also planning to expand iTunes to Samsung Smart TVs in the form of an iTunes app, and AirPlay 2 functionality is being built into recent smart TV sets from a number of manufacturers like Sony and

Spotify Files Complaint Against Apple With European Regulators Over 'Unfair' App Store Practices

Spotify has filed a complaint against Apple with the European Commission, accusing the iPhone maker of enforcing App Store rules that "purposely limit choice and stifle innovation at the expense of the user experience" and "acting as both a player and referee to deliberately disadvantage other app developers." In a blog post, Spotify founder and CEO Daniel Ek took particular issue with Apple charging a 30 percent "tax" on App Store purchases. This results in Spotify charging existing subscribers $12.99 per month for its Premium plan via the App Store just to collect nearly the $9.99 per month it charges normally. Ek believes this gives Apple an "unfair advantage," since Spotify is unable to fairly compete with Apple Music's standard $9.99 per month price within the App Store. This is a big deal given there are over a billion active iOS devices. As an alternative, if Spotify chooses not to collect payments via the App Store, Ek notes that Apple "applies a series of technical and experience-limiting restrictions" on the company. Over time, this has also included "locking Spotify and other competitors out of Apple services such as Siri, HomePod, and Apple Watch." Ek stresses that this is "not a Spotify-versus-Apple issue" and simply about seeking "the same fair rules for companies young and old, large and small." Apps like Uber and Deliveroo, for example, are allowed to collect payments directly from customers since they offer "goods or services that will be consumed outside of the app," according to

Apple Adding Original Art From Iconic Artists to Thousands of Apple Music Playlists

For the last few weeks, Apple has been updating the artwork on playlists within Apple Music, and today, The Verge has shed some light on the reason why with input from Apple's global director of editorial, Rachel Newman. Apple is using original artwork from well-known artists like the creator of the AC/DC logo for playlists in an effort to bring instant recognition to its content and to better connect with different communities. New art for the Hip Hop Hits playlist, designed by the artist who created Migos' Culture album cover According to Newman, the custom art for playlists is meant to be a "visual representation of the music that you will find inside the playlist."That rootedness in specific cultures was something that Apple wanted to emphasize when it was commissioning art. "Suddenly there is really no strong definition of a genre anymore like there used to [be], you know, in the olden days," said Newman, the editorial director. Genre is now, in her words, a melting pot.For each genre, Apple is choosing "huge name" artists that fit well and have worked within the genre before. Stole "Moab" Stojmenov, who designed the cover for Migos' album "Culture," created the art for Apple's "Hip Hop Hits" playlist, for example. Carlos Perez, who directed the video for hit song "Despacito," created artwork for several playlists, including "Dale Reggaetón." Perez said that with Apple's freedom, he aimed for authenticity when creating the artwork, which seems to be Apple's goal with the project. Apple plans to redesign "many thousands" of Apple Music

Samsung to Preinstall Spotify on New Smartphones, Including Galaxy S10

Spotify today announced that its streaming music service will be preinstalled on the latest Samsung smartphones starting today, including the Galaxy S10, S10+, S10e, S10 5G, Galaxy Fold, and select Galaxy A models. New subscribers on those devices can receive a free six-month Spotify Premium trial in the United States. The announcement reflects a major extension of a partnership that saw Spotify become Samsung's go-to music service provider in August 2018, a move intended to provide a seamless listening experience across Samsung devices. Spotify being preinstalled on millions of Samsung smartphones brings it more in line with Apple Music, preinstalled on hundreds of millions of iOS devices. Last month, Spotify announced that it had 96 million paid subscribers as of the end of 2018, easily topping Apple Music's over 50 million subscribers. We recently put together an Apple Music vs. Spotify guide that compares the two streaming music

Apple Not Fighting Royalty Increase for Songwriters That Spotify, Pandora, Google and Amazon Have Appealed

Spotify, Google, Pandora, and Amazon have all teamed up to appeal a ruling by the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board that will increase royalties paid to songwriters by 44 percent, reports Variety. In a joint statement, the companies, which all operate major streaming music services, said that the decision harms both music licensees and copyright owners. "The Copyright Royalty Board (CRB), in a split decision, recently issued the U.S. mechanical statutory rates in a manner that raises serious procedural and substantive concerns. If left to stand, the CRB's decision harms both music licensees and copyright owners. Accordingly, we are asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to review the decision."Apple is not joining the other streaming music services and will not appeal the decision. According to Variety, songwriter organizations have been heavily praising Apple while condemning the other streaming services. David Israelite, CEO of the National Music Publishers' association, called the appeals from Spotify, Pandora, Google and Amazon "tech bullies who do not respect or value the songwriters who make their businesses possible." He also thanked Apple Music for not participating in the appeal and for "continuing to be a friend to

Streaming Music Contributed 75% of Total U.S. Music Industry Revenues for 2018

Streaming music services like Apple Music, Spotify, Google Play Music, Pandora, and others are continuing to grow in popularity and in 2018, were responsible for 75 percent of total U.S. music industry revenues, according to a new year-end music industry report released today by the RIAA. [PDF] Revenue from streaming platforms grew 30 percent year over year and hit $7.4 billion. Total music industry revenue for 2018 was at $9.8 billion, up from $8.8 billion in 2017 and $7.6 billion in 2016. Digital downloads from storefronts like iTunes made up 11 percent of total revenue in 2018, and physical sales of records and CDs made up 12 percent. Digital downloads fell for the sixth consecutive year and were eclipsed by physical sales, which were also down, with the exception of vinyl record sales (up 8%). Paid on-demand subscription services like Apple Music were responsible for much of the music industry's revenue growth, with ad-supported services and customized radio services making up a smaller portion of the growth. Overall subscription revenues increased a total of 32 percent from 2017 to 2018, totaling $5.4 billion, thanks to 42 percent growth in the average number of paid subscriptions. The RIAA does not break down revenue by subscription music service, but at last count, Apple Music had 50 million paying subscribers, while Spotify had 87 million.

Google Says Bug Caused Apple Music to Appear in Google Home App [Updated]

Apple Music's brief appearance in the Google Home app earlier this week was due to a software bug, a Google spokesperson confirmed to Bloomberg. Specifically, we've been told that the Google Assistant and Google Home apps share various settings for music services. Due to a bug, Google opened up the Apple Music setting more broadly than it intended, including to Google Home app users. In an earlier statement, a Google spokesperson said "Apple Music is currently only available for Google Assistant users on mobile phones. We have nothing to announce regarding updates to Google Home." Back in December, Apple Music became available on Amazon's range of Echo speakers, so there was hope that the service would be expanding to Google Home speakers too. Many other music services are available on Google Home, including Spotify, Pandora, Deezer, Google Play Music, and YouTube Music. Of course, Apple Music could launch on Google Home eventually, and the two companies could be simply hiding their tracks. Apple Music is currently available on iOS, Android, Apple Watch, Apple TV, HomePod, and Amazon Echo and Sonos speakers. Apple Music can also be controlled with the Google Assistant app on iOS

Apple Music Integration Possibly Coming to Google Home Devices [Updated]

Apple Music may be soon be available as an option on Google Home devices, according to an image that was shared by MacRumors reader Jason. We were able to track down the Apple Music listing within the Google Home app for iOS devices, but at the current time, it can't be linked to a Google Home device. In previous versions of Google's software, Apple Music was listed in a separate "limited availability" section of the app and also "Only available on iOS devices". The updated listing suggests that Apple could soon make Apple Music an available option for Google Assistant-powered playback on Google Home devices, much like it did with the Amazon Echo. Back in December, Apple Music became available on Amazon's range of Echo speakers, allowing Alexa voice commands to be used to control Apple Music playback. The Apple Music listing appears to be relatively new, and given that it's not working, it suggests an upcoming feature. Apple Music expanding to Google Home speakers would make Apple's music service more accessible across all of the most popular smart home speakers that are available at the current time, expanding access far beyond just the HomePod. Many other music services are available on Google Home, including Spotify, Pandora, Google Play Music, YouTube Music, and Deezer. Update: In a statement to VentureBeat, Google said that Apple Music is limited to Google Assistant and there is no new announcement regarding Google Home: "Apple

Some Apple Music Users Unable to Load 'For You' Tab in iTunes Recently: 'An Error Occurred'

Over the past few weeks, a handful of users have reported receiving the message "an error occurred" when attempting to load the "For You" tab in iTunes, which provides personalized recommendations for Apple Music. When clicking the "OK" button to reload, affected users are instead redirected to the "Browse" tab. MacRumors has been able to reproduce this issue in iTunes version 12.9.2.5 on macOS Mojave version 10.14.3, although based on comments across the MacRumors forums and Apple Support Communities, the error message does not appear to be limited to specific versions of iTunes or macOS or any other parameters. Many users are able to access the "For You" tab as usual, but others have been seeing this error message persist since early February. Affected users are still able to access "For You" on an iPhone, iPad, or other device with Apple Music. While some affected users can temporarily access the "For You" tab in iTunes after signing out and back in to their Apple ID account, the error message eventually returns. On our affected machine, nothing we have done has restored access to the tab, including force quitting iTunes and restarting the Mac. All in all, this is a minor issue, but hopefully one that is addressed soon. We reached out to Apple to see if it is aware of the issue, but we have yet to hear back. One affected user claimed that Apple has engineers working on a

Classical Music on Apple Music: What's Wrong and How Apple Can Fix It

Last August, Apple Music was updated with a new section in Browse curated by Deutsche Grammophon, one of the biggest classical music labels in the world. While classical music fans welcomed the specific focus of the area, many of our readers quickly pointed out the numerous issues that remain for classical listeners on a daily basis within Apple Music, and the fact that they've been there since the launch of the service with seemingly no correction in sight. To help break down and highlight these problems, we reached out to a few experts in the classical music field, including professor Benjamin Charles, who wrote a blog post about his frustrations with streaming music services last October. We also spoke with Franz Rumiz, a classical music fan whose article "Why Apple Music fails with classical music" struck a chord with the community in early 2017. Frustrations with classical music streaming are nothing new, but as Charles tells us, this is a problem that affects nearly every streaming music service, including Apple Music rival Spotify. In an effort to find out exactly what's wrong with classical music on Apple Music -- and what steps could be taken to address these problems -- we asked Charles and Rumiz to detail the biggest issues with classical music on Apple Music. The Problems Classical music is treated as a single genre When you tap on "Genres" in Apple Music's Browse tab, you're treated with a list of over 30 styles of music, from Alternative and African Music to Christian,

Ariana Grande's 'Thank U, Next' Breaks Apple Music Record for Most-Streamed Pop Album in First 24 Hours

Ariana Grande's latest album "Thank U, Next" has set a few Apple Music records since its debut on Friday, February 8. The music streaming service told Billboard that "Thank U, Next" saw the highest day 1 streams ever for a pop album on Apple Music. This also makes "Thank U, Next" the biggest debut for any female artist in any genre on Apple Music within the first 24 hours of release. Ariana began releasing singles for the album last year, starting with the title track "Thank U, Next" and followed by "Imagine" and "7 Rings." "Thank U, Next" released about six months after Grande's previous album, Sweetener. Other recent Apple Music records include Shawn Mendes' self-titled third studio album becoming the most-streamed pop album of 2018, and Cardi B's "Invasion of Privacy" setting a new record for first-week streams by a female artist, beating Taylor Swift's "Reputation." "Thank U, Next" appears to be on the path to battling both of those albums for the record of first-week streams by a female artist on Apple Music. According to the latest numbers, Apple Music now has over 50 million paid subscribers around the world. This update came during Apple's latest earnings call and was the first update on Apple Music subscriber numbers since May 2018, when Apple Music had 50 million paying and trial subscribers combined. In comparison, Spotify now has 96 million paid global

Apple Shares New Memoji Ads Featuring Ariana Grande, Khalid, and Florida Georgia Line

Apple today shared a trio of new Memoji ads on its YouTube channel featuring Ariana Grande, Khalid, and Florida Georgia Line. The videos highlight today's release of Grande's full album "Thank U, Next," yesterday's release of Khalid's single "Talk," and the upcoming release of Florida Georgia Line's country album "Can't Say I Ain't Country" on February 15. All of the songs and albums can be streamed with Apple Music. Grande and Florida Georgia Line are nominees for the 61st GRAMMY Awards, airing this Sunday on CBS at 8 p.m. Eastern Time. Grande and fellow nominees Shawn Mendes and Kacey Musgraves are featured on Memoji billboards in Los Angeles.

Apple Music's New Memoji Billboards Highlight Grammy Nominees Shawn Mendes, Ariana Grande, and Kacey Musgraves

Apple Music has recently launched a new advertising campaign in Los Angeles, showcasing the Memoji versions of musicians including Shawn Mendes, Ariana Grande, and Kacey Musgraves. Apple put up the billboards ahead of the 61st Annual Grammy Awards, which take place on February 10 at the Los Angeles Staples Center. I love this! Shawn Mendes: The Album has been made into an emoji! It’s on a billboard at Hotel Figueroa in LA ❤️ pic.twitter.com/SfKHGI157e— Shawn Mendes (@shawnsmutual) February 4, 2019 Apple has placed the billboards at the Hotel Figueroa in LA, which is down the street from the Staples Center. It appears there are multiple billboards in the city, however, including some that are dedicated specifically to each of the three artists and highlighting their Grammy nominations. .@KaceyMusgraves ‘Golden Hour’ Apple Music emoji billboards around the city in LA! pic.twitter.com/ILIs8ShdKG— Kacey Musgraves Daily (@musgravesdaily) February 4, 2019 Memojis are animated emoji characters that can take the form of each user's personal appearance, and using the TrueDepth camera system on iPhone X family devices, you can animate the Memojis with your facial movements. Apple has used Animoji in its ads a few times previously, including for last year's Grammy awards. Those commercials had the alien Animoji singing "Redbone" by Childish Gambino and the Animoji dog, fox, and poop singing "Stir Fry" from Migos. As for the nominations, Shawn Mendes has two, one for song of the year ("In My Blood") and one for best pop vocal album (the self-titled

Beats 1's Zane Lowe to Keynote Music Business Conference in Nashville as Apple Music Crosses 50M Paying Subscribers

The Music Business Association today announced that Beats 1 anchor Zane Lowe will be the keynote speaker at its 2019 conference on May 5 at 5 p.m. local time. The event will take place at the JW Marriott in Nashville. In addition to his Beats 1 role, Lowe is the Global Head of Artist Relations for Apple Music. The Grammy-nominated producer and DJ has been part of Apple Music since its inception in June 2015, building upon an established career in music broadcasting at MTV, XFM, and BBC Radio 1 in the United Kingdom. The conference will also feature a series of digital music workshops hosted by Apple Music, Amazon, Pandora, Spotify, SoundCloud, and YouTube and interviews with other music industry executives. Registration is open now. In related news, Apple during its earnings call yesterday revealed that Apple Music now has over 50 million paying subscribers. This was the first update on that front since May 2018, when Apple Music had 50 million paying and trial subscribers combined. Spotify had 87 million paying subscribers as of September

Apple Music Subscribers Can Stream Songs Without Buying Wi-Fi on American Airlines Flights in U.S. Starting Friday

Apple today announced that, starting February 1, Apple Music subscribers can access Apple Music on any American Airlines flight in the United States equipped with Viasat satellite technology with no Wi-Fi purchase required. American Airlines is the first commercial airline to provide exclusive access to Apple Music through complimentary inflight Wi-Fi. This applies to the iPhone and likely extends to the iPad, Mac or PC, and Android smartphones. American Airlines will also be offering a collection of unique city-themed playlists through Apple Music starting February

Apple Music Gets Another Unofficial Web Player With Launch of 'Musish'

Last month, software engineer Naveed Golafshani created an unofficial Apple Music web player that allowed users to sign into their Apple Music accounts and listen to music on a laptop or desktop computer, without needing to open iTunes. This is an addition to Apple Music that many subscribers have been requesting for years, and now another unofficial Apple Music web player has emerged online. Created by software engineer Brychan Bennett-Odlum and his team, Raphaël Vigée, James Jarvis, and Filip Grebowski, the new web player is called "Musish" [GitHub Link]. Musish has an all-white design that closely mirrors the look and feel of Apple Music on iOS and macOS. Just like the previous player, Musish requires you to sign in to your Apple ID to be able to play music on the web, using Apple's official public APIs to handle authentication. This is handled in a separate window under the Apple.com domain, and Musish says at no point does it ever request, log, or gain access to user information. Bennett-Odlum told us that he and his team are heavy Apple Music users, and the origins of Musish began at a hackathon event in San Francisco just last month. We are all heavy users of Apple Music, but found listening at work hard as it drained our phones’ battery lives and we didn’t want to set up our Apple IDs on our work laptops. We started Musish at a hackathon in San Francisco in early December after noticing the APIs Apple provide for the service and realising that it’d be a pretty nifty solution

Apple Highlighting Future's 'THE WIZRD' Album and Documentary

Future's newest album, "THE WIZRD, is now available on Apple Music along with an exclusive documentary. Apple is highlighting the new content on its main Apple.com website. "THE WIZRD" includes previously released singles like "Crushed Up" and "Jumpin on a Jet," along with features from Travis Scott, Young Thug, Tay Keith, and more. Accompanying the album is access to Future's documentary, also titled "THE WIZRD." The hour long documentary gives a peek into Future's "formative life moments." It features guests that include Rico Wade, DJ Khaled, Metro Boomin, Yo Gotti, and André 3000, who share details on Future's "obsessive work ethic" and "unique rhyme

Verizon Reportedly Adding Apple Music as Free Perk on Select Unlimited Data Plans [Update: Confirmed]

Verizon subscribers with an iPhone or Android smartphone and a Beyond Unlimited or Above Unlimited data plan will soon have unlimited access to Apple Music at no additional cost, according to documentation obtained by 9to5Mac. The report claims the free Apple Music subscription is not simply a trial but rather will be offered on an ongoing basis. Verizon's lower-priced Go Unlimited plan with reduced data speeds will continue to offer a six-month Apple Music trial, as the Beyond Unlimited and Above Unlimited plans currently do. The perk will be available to both new and existing subscribers starting this Thursday, January 17, the report adds. Verizon's documentation suggests there is no catch, with the monthly prices of Beyond Unlimited and Above Unlimited plans expected to remain unchanged, but we'll know for sure in a few days. The perk will compete with T-Mobile's offer of free Netflix to subscribers who have two or more unlimited data lines with the carrier. An individual Apple Music subscription typically costs $9.99 per month. Update: Verizon has confirmed that Apple Music will be included as a perk for its Beyond Unlimited and Above Unlimited plans starting on January