Apple Pencil

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The Apple Pencil is a stylus that was designed specifically to work with the iPad Pro, giving artists and creative a tool that can offer a level of precision far beyond that of a finger. Designed to mimic the feel and sensation of using a pen or a pencil, the Apple Pencil has built in sensors to determine orientation and angle and to detect a range of forces for pressure-sensitive drawing and writing.

Apple's iPad Pro scans the signal coming from the Apple Pencil 240 times per second for a lag-free writing experience and "almost imperceptible" latency. The Apple Pencil is specific to the iPad Pro and does not work with other devices.

'Apple Pencil' Reviews

Review: You Won't Lose Your Apple Pencil Cap With the PencilCozy

If you own an Apple Pencil, you've probably already misplaced its cap once or twice when charging it. The cap, which hides the Lightning connector, is fully removable and easily lost, a flaw the PencilCozy, from Cozy Industries, aims to fix. Made of a soft, pliable silicone, the PencilCozy has a top portion that fits snugly over the cap of the Apple Pencil and a ring that fits over the Apple Pencil itself. Between the top of the cozy and the ring, there's a strip of silicone to connect the two pieces to ensure the cap of the Apple Pencil doesn't become separated from the body when it's removed for charging. The PencilCozy comes in three colors: an opaque white that closely matches the white shade of the Apple Pencil, a minty teal green shade, and a glow-in-the dark color that's a translucent white in the light and a bright green in the dark. The glow-in-the-dark shade may be useful for locating the Apple Pencil in the dark, but because the glow doesn't last very long it's more of a novelty than a truly functional feature. Both the design and the colors are muted enough that they don't stand out or significantly interfere with the aesthetic of the Apple Pencil, but people who like the unadulterated look of the accessory may not want to sully it with an $8 piece of rubber. I didn't mind the appearance of the PencilCozy, taking into account its utility.

'Apple Pencil' Articles

New iPad Pro With Faster Display and Wider Support for Apple Pencil to Launch Next Year

Apple is planning new hardware and software features for iPad that cater to professional users, according to Bloomberg, including a new iPad with faster display technology that allows for smoother on-screen zooming, panning, and scrolling. KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo previously said Apple will release a 10.5-inch iPad Pro model next year alongside a 12.9-inch iPad Pro 2 and a "low-cost" 9.7-inch iPad model. The fate of the iPad mini remains uncertain, but it is presumable that Apple could discontinue the 7.9-inch tablet due to its lack of Apple Pencil support and relatively close proximity in size to 5.5-inch Plus-sized iPhones. The new hardware will be completed by wider iOS support for the Apple Pencil, the report adds. Apple is reportedly planning to introduce the new software features in a subsequent iOS 10 update in the first half of 2017, but may decide to hold back on the improvements until iOS 11 is released later in the year.Apple has considered allowing users to annotate objects in many applications across the whole operating system, including in Mail, the Safari web browser, and iMessage, similar to what Samsung Electronics Co. offers on its Note smartphones, the person said. Currently, Apple only supports Pencil functionality in specifically developed apps.Apple saw its iPad revenue grow slightly for the first time in 10 quarters in July, and these improvements could help the company continue that

'Stranger Things' Poster Began as Sketch Created With iPad Pro and Apple Pencil

In a recent interview with Mashable, an artist based in the United Kingdom, Kyle Lambert, divulged his process of creating the memorable poster art for Netflix's science fiction series Stranger Things. Netflix asked the artist to keep with the 80's theme of the show, and provided him with a vague plot outline, rough cuts of only the first few episodes, and some still shots "to communicate the story in a single image." Ultimately, Lambert said he decided on the iPad Pro for the project because the tablet lets him "sketch in a very natural way," especially when used in conjunction with the Apple Pencil. He used the Apple device in the sketching process of the main poster art that has gained fame online in the weeks since Stranger Things launched in July, but Lambert has also been known to create impressive art on iPads over the years, particularly in a photorealistic representation of Morgan Freeman he created on an iPad Air in 2013. "This was a very exciting project for me, as an artist that trained with oil paints, I really enjoyed the challenge of reproducing this traditional painting style using digital tools," Lambert told Mashable. "I used the iPad Pro to do the preliminary composition ideas and the sketch that became the final Stranger Things poster. I chose to use the iPad Pro for the drawing stage of the poster because I find that I am able to sketch in a very natural way on the device using the Apple Pencil. The device in general is nice to hold for long periods of time, it is really portable and Procreate, the app that I used, has some really great

Future Apple Pencil Could Include Motion Sensors and Magic Trackpad Compatibility

The United States Patent and Trademark Office today granted Apple a patent for a "Stylus with inertial sensor," equating to an advanced version of the Apple Pencil that could potentially function with the company's iMac-compatible Magic Trackpad (via Patently Apple). The patent was originally filed in November 2014, but was only recently published in May of 2016. The patent briefly mentions the combination of the Apple Pencil and Magic Trackpad (or "electronic equipment"), which would receive "electromagnetic signals from electrodes at the first end of the stylus" and translate a user's drawing into a compatible iMac program. The potential integration could bring artistic drawings and programs to Apple's desktop line, similar to the boom such apps saw with the release of the Apple Pencil and iPad Pro last year. Overall, the new patent details a next-generation Apple Pencil with a far greater technological reach than the current version of the stylus. The proposed update could bring in-air gestures in order to let users control Keynote slides or rotate objects on an iMac screen, turn the accessory into a joystick for games, or even use the Apple Pencil as "an air mouse" in lieu of the Magic Trackpad itself. Apple Pencil used as a joystick for interacting with 3D objects (left) and air mouse (right) Although Apple was granted the patent today, as with other patents, it's a good idea to remain wary as to how long it will take the company to announce, reveal, and release such a device like the Apple Pencil described here, if it ever will. All the same, it would

Apple Now Selling Apple Pencil Replacement Tips

As of today, Apple has started offering replacement tips for the Apple Pencil in its online store. A set of four Apple Pencil tips can be purchased for $19, with deliveries estimated to take place on Wednesday, March 23 at the earliest. The $99 Apple Pencil ships with an extra tip in the box, but until today, there was no way to purchase additional tips from Apple. When the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil launched, Apple said it would add replacement tips in the future, a promise it has now made good on. Apple Pencil tips can be replaced by unscrewing the old tip, inserting the new tip, and screwing it in place. The launch of the new Apple Pencil tips comes as Apple debuts the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, a second iPad in the iPad Pro family able to take advantage of the Apple Pencil. (Thanks, Michael!)

Apple Pencil Navigation Functionality to Return in Next iOS 9.3 Beta

The early iOS 9.3 betas removed key functionality from the Apple Pencil, an unpopular move that eliminated its ability to be used for navigation. There were rumors suggesting the feature removal was intentional, but Apple today told The Verge that's not the case. Apple has confirmed that the features that have been removed in iOS 9.3 will be returning in the next beta, and that they have been temporarily pulled as the company works on improvements."We believe a finger will always be the primary way users navigate on an iPad, but we understand that some customers like to use Apple Pencil for this as well and we've been working on ways to better implement this while maintaining compatibility during this latest beta cycle," a spokesperson said. "We will add this functionality back in the next beta of iOS 9.3."Since the first iOS 9.3 beta, the Apple Pencil has not been able to be used for tasks like selecting text, scrolling, swiping between apps, accessing menus, and general editing functions in non-drawing apps. These are all features that are available in iOS 9.2, and their absence from four betas in a row led customers to think the removal was both permanent and intentional. The inability to use the Apple Pencil for navigating has been frustrating for iPad Pro owners, and many of our own MacRumors readers said they would not upgrade to the new operating system if it meant being unable to use the iPad Pro outside of drawing

Inability to Use Apple Pencil for Navigation in iOS 9.3 Appears to be Intentional

Over the course of the iOS 9.3 beta testing period, iPad Pro users running the update have noticed a disturbing feature removal that limits the functionality of the Apple Pencil. In the current version of iOS, iOS 9.2, the Apple Pencil can be used for navigational purposes, just like a finger. It's possible to tap on buttons, select text, scroll, swipe between apps, access menus, and access general editing controls in non-drawing apps. With iOS 9.3, much of that functionality has been removed. The Apple Pencil is no longer able to be used for selecting and manipulating text or doing things like scrolling -- it's only available for selecting buttons and drawing, sketching, and writing within apps. Early on, Apple Pencil users thought the feature removal was perhaps a bug, but full Apple Pencil functionality has not been restored in later betas and the release notes that accompany betas have never mentioned the Apple Pencil's inability to be used for navigational purposes as a known issue. In a recent podcast, Relay.fm co-founder Myke Hurley said he's heard that the decision isn't a bug, but an intentional design decision.Sources in the know confirm that removing the functionality of the Apple Pencil is a decision inside of Apple. It is not a bug they have overlooked for three betas. It is a decision.Earlier today, iMore's Serenity Caldwell wrote an opinion piece outlining the issue and calling on Apple not to remove the Apple Pencil's existing capabilities. In her post, she points out the Apple Pencil can no longer be used for tasks like editing videos in iMovie for

Pixelmator for iOS Updated With Support for iPad Pro, Apple Pencil and 3D Touch

The team behind popular image editing app Pixelmator for Mac and iOS today announced a major update to its Pixelmator app for iOS, introducing full support and optimization for Apple's iPad Pro and Apple Pencil. There's a new palm rejection feature that allows users to rest their palms on the screen when sketching and editing images with the Apple Pencil, which works with more than 50 brushes in the Pixelmator app. Pixelmator also takes full advantage of the iPad Pro's speed, with 16K image support for editing images up to 100 megapixels. "User feedback about the desktop-class features of Pixelmator for iOS has been amazing, and today we're excited to make all those features available on the iPad Pro," said Saulius Dailide, one of the founders of Pixelmator Team. "Pixelmator on the iPad Pro gives you more space to create thanks to the large 12.9-inch display, allows you to paint more naturally than ever with full Apple Pencil and palm-rejection support, and lets you edit incredibly large images up to 100 megapixels."Today's update also introduces support for 3D Touch on the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus, adding Quick Action shortcuts when using a force touch on the Pixelmator icon on the home screen. 3D Touch support also brings 3D Touch-sensitive painting to Pixelmator, letting iPhone users vary the pressure on the screen to change the thickness of a brush stroke. Pixelmator 2.2 includes a few other improvements, like a new collection of artist-designed basic brushes, improved crop performance, an auto-straighten feature, and the ability to increase font

Apple Now Allowing Personal Pickup for Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard

Stock of the Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard remains low, but Apple is now allowing customers to use its Personal Pickup feature to order the devices online and arrange to pick them up in a local Apple Store. Enabling Personal Pickup may make it easier for customers hoping to get an Apple Pencil or Smart Keyboard to locate one nearby, as it lists retail stock that's shipped to stores each day. Both the Apple Pencil and the Smart Keyboard were unavailable on the day the iPad Pro launched, with the earliest November 11 buyers receiving their accessories a week or two later. Those who were not lucky enough to order right at midnight when the iPad Pro launched were stuck with delivery estimates that ranged into late December. Orders placed today list a delivery estimate of mid-January. Though it's impossible to get an Apple Pencil or Smart Keyboard online, Apple has been sending small shipments of the accessories to its retail stores each day, allowing some lucky customers to purchase in store. Prior to today, the only way to get an Apple Pencil or Smart Keyboard was to show up shortly after a shipment was received, as there was no way to track supplies online. With Personal Pickup, it's now possible to see exactly which stores have which devices in stock in the United States and other countries. It appears that the Apple Pencil and the Smart Keyboard are not available in many stores across the country at the current time, with stores in many of the major cities we checked listing it as "Unavailable for Pickup." A couple of MacRumors readers have been able to

Apple Pencil Used as Weight Scale, Synthesizer and 3D Image Editing Controller

While the Apple Pencil is designed as a sketching tool for creative professionals, MacRumors reader Simon Gladman has created three Swift demo apps that show the accessory being used for three unconventional purposes -- as a weight scale, controlled synthesizer and 3D controller for image editing. PencilScale PencilScale, based on Goodman's Plum-O-Meter, is an experimental app that uses a homemade harness to turn the Apple Pencil into an electronic scale that is highly sensitive, but not incredibly accurate. The experiment works by subtracting the touch's force from a base weight, which is "set as the current touch force when the 'zero' button is pressed," and multiplying it by 140 for a very rough weight in grams. PencilSynth PencilSynth is an AudioKit-powered synthesizer that can be controlled by the Apple Pencil depending on its orientation and position. Apple Pencil's horizontal position on the screen controls frequency Apple Pencil's vertical position on the screen controls the modulating multiplier Apple Pencil's altitude angle controls the carrier multiplier Apple Pencil's azimuth angle controls the modulation index PencilController PencilController is an experimental image processing app that uses the Apple Pencil as a controller for the fine setting of parameters on Core Image filters. The demo has three image filtering modes: Hue/Saturation - Apple Pencil's azimuth angle controls hue and its altitude angle controls the saturation Brightness/Contrast - Apple Pencil's altitude angle along North/South controls contrast and the angle

iPad Pro Artists Share Apple Pencil Drawings

Now that Apple Stores are beginning to receive more reliable Apple Pencil shipments, some early adopters of the iPad Pro have been able to purchase the accessory over the past week and put it to the test. Many of those iPad Pro users have been sharing their work in the MacRumors discussion forums, and many of the drawings posted have been very creative. Below is a gallery of some of the sketches shared. Giraffe and Hippo — markol88 Manga — vincentriemer Nike Shoes — snugja

Best Buy Now Offering Apple Pencil, Orders Arrive as Early as Next Week

Best Buy has the in-demand Apple Pencil in stock and is accepting orders for the device as of today. Supplies may go quickly, but for the time being, Best Buy's site says orders will arrive as early as Tuesday, November 24 with express shipping, or Thursday, December 3 with standard shipping. Best Buy's stock may already be low as the site sometimes lists the Apple Pencil as unavailable before listing it as purchasable upon refresh. Best Buy appears to be one of the only stores with actual stock of the Apple Pencil. At Staples, the Apple Pencil is listed as "Coming Soon" with stock arriving on November 25, which is the only other upcoming availability date. MacMall is accepting orders, but shipments won't arrive for three weeks, while B&H Photo is also accepting pre-orders without an estimated shipment timeline. At Adorama and Walmart, the Apple Pencil is listed as out of stock. On Apple's own site, the Apple Pencil has an estimated shipping date of four to five weeks, with orders placed today arriving between December 23 and December 30 at the earliest. Apple retail stores have been receiving shipments of the Apple Pencil, so the best way to get one immediately may be to check in regularly at a local Apple Store.

iPad Pro and Apple Pencil Compared to Surface Pro 4 and Surface Pen

Apple released the iPad Pro last week as a direct competitor to Microsoft's new Surface Pro 4. The high-end tablets are primarily targeted at creative professionals, with the companion Apple Pencil and Surface Pen available as precise input tools to complement your finger. iMore has shared a new video that compares sketching with the Apple Pencil on the iPad Pro to the Surface Pen on Microsoft's new Surface Book, which has equivalent display technology as the Surface Pro 4. Editor Serenity Caldwell found the Surface Pen to be "about as responsive" as the Apple Pencil, but said Microsoft's stylus pressure was slightly harder to control and had more trouble at writing small type. The Verge has created a similar video that provides more of a high-level comparison of the iPad Pro vs. Surface Pro 4, while also touching upon the Apple Pencil and Surface Pen and showing some limited usage of each accessory. Editor Jacob Kastrenakes called the Apple Pencil "one of the best" he has ever used, adding that the Surface Pen "can be a little less natural" but benefits from having a hardware eraser -- which the Apple Pencil doesn't have. Kastrenakes said the Apple Pencil is "really responsive" and has "amazing palm rejection," and he offered similar accolades for the Surface Pen, although quality will vary from app to app on both the iPad Pro and Surface Pro 4. Apple Pencil online orders began to see movement earlier this week, while Apple retail stores started receiving more reliable Apple Pencil shipments on Tuesday for in-store purchase. The accessory is

Apple Pencil Teardown Reveals Antenna, Battery and Tiny Folded Logic Board

iFixit has completed an Apple Pencil teardown, removing the outer plastic casing to reveal the pencil's inner metal cylinder. The teardown provides a closer look at several Apple Pencil components, including the antenna, battery, pencil nib, Lightning connector and miniature folded logic board. Apple Pencil has two emitters in the tip that enable the iPad Pro to determine the pencil nib's angle and orientation relative to the display, and adjust the pen stroke accordingly, explains iFixit. iPad Pro has a digitizer that likely determines the distance from each emitter to the screen. At the core of the Apple Pencil is a tiny 0.329 Wh lithium-ion rechargeable battery that holds just 5% of the charge of an iPhone 6s battery, next to a small cylindrical black and gold antenna. There is also a small ribbon cable that connects the Apple Pencil's battery with its Lightning connector for charging. On the other side of the battery is the Apple Pencil's tiny folded logic board that weighs just one gram, yet houses more than five components, including an ST Microelectronics low-power 32-bit ARM-based Cortex-M3 microcontroller and Qualcomm Bluetooth 4.1 chip from Cambridge Silicon Radio. - Red: ST Microelectronics STML151UCY6 Ultra-low-power 32-bit RISC ARM-based Cortex-M3 MCU - Orange: ST Microelectronics AS5C Y533 (also found in the 2015 Apple TV) - Yellow: L05286 QS4 VG Z SGP 528 - Green: EWX 01129 - Not shown: Cambridge Silicon Radio Qualcomm CSR1012A05 Bluetooth Smart IC iFixit awarded the Apple Pencil its lowest repairability score of 1 out of 10. While the

Hands-On With the iPad Pro Apple Pencil

The Apple Pencil has technically been available for purchase since last week, but supplies of the iPad Pro accessory have been tight. Orders placed on launch day, November 11, are just starting to arrive to customers this week, and retail stores only began receiving reliable shipments starting yesterday. We picked up an Apple Pencil yesterday afternoon and did a hands-on video to give MacRumors readers a look at the highly sought iPad Pro accessory. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. The Apple Pencil is an accessory that's unique to the iPad Pro and was built from the ground up alongside the tablet. It's aimed at creative professionals who need a more precise tool for sketching, drawing, writing, and other tasks where accuracy is imperative. Pressure and positioning sensors built into the Apple Pencil let it detect a range of forces, enabling pressure sensitive writing and drawing. When used with the iPad Pro, the tablet scans the signal coming from the device more than 240 times per second, resulting in the low latency levels seen in the video. Tilt sensors in the tip of the Apple Pencil determine the orientation and the angle of the hand holding it, so it's possible to do things like shading by using the side of the tip. Apple has designed the Apple Pencil to work alongside a finger, so it can be used simultaneously with touch gestures. It also has palm rejection technology, so you can rest your hand on the iPad Pro screen when drawing or writing. There's a Lightning connector at the bottom of the Apple Pencil that's used for

More Apple Stores Begin Receiving Very Limited Stock of Apple Pencil

While the iPad Pro launched nearly a week ago, many early adopters have been unable to get their hands on the companion Apple Pencil. With shipping estimates of 3-4 weeks or longer for the accessory on the Apple Online Store, some prospective buyers have been checking their local Apple Retail Stores for stock and tracking their results in our discussion forums. Apple Pencil stock at SoHo Apple Store in New York City earlier today Beginning early Tuesday, it appears that more Apple Retail Stores in the U.S. have begun receiving very limited Apple Pencil stock. MacRumors forum member JuanKr shared the above picture of Apple Pencil stock at the SoHo Apple Store in Manhattan, New York, while we have independently confirmed Apple Pencil stock as of writing at the Oakridge Apple Store in San Jose, California. MacRumors forum members have shared a handful of other Apple Stores with Apple Pencil stock over the past 24 hours, listed below, although some have since sold out and we cannot guarantee stock remaining at every store due to the combination of limited supplies and strong demand. We recommend calling your local Apple Store prior to visiting, but some customers have had better luck in person. - SanTan Village in Gilbert, AZ - Arrowhead in Glendale, AZ - Burlingame Avenue in Burlingame, CA - Los Cerritos in Cerritos, CA - South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa, CA - Century City in Los Angeles, CA - Manhattan Village in Manhattan Beach, CA - UTC in San Diego, CA - Union Square in San Francisco, CA - Oakridge in San Jose, CA - Valley Fair in Santa Clara, CA -

First Apple Pencil Orders in the U.S. Now 'Preparing for Shipment'

Though the iPad Pro has been widely available in Apple retail stores since its launch last Wednesday, supplies of the Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard have been much more limited. At launch, there were no Apple Pencils or Smart Keyboards available for purchase in the U.S. with in-store pickup, and the first online orders listed delivery dates of November 19 at the earliest, more than a week after the iPad Pro became available. As of today, pre-order customers with some of the earliest upcoming estimated delivery dates are seeing some movement with their orders, receiving notifications that their Apple Pencils are now preparing for shipment. MacRumors reader Jose's Apple Pencil is preparing to ship with an estimated delivery date of November 20 to November 24, and there are a few other reports of Apple Pencil shipment changes on Twitter. With orders already preparing for shipment, it's likely customers who managed to pre-order right around midnight on November 11 will start receiving their shipments later this week. A few customers in the United Kingdom have already received their Apple Pencil orders. Customers who order an Apple Pencil online right now will not be able to receive the device until mid-to-late December, and the same goes for the Smart Keyboard, which is equally scarce. After the iPad Pro's midnight launch, delivery estimates for the Apple Pencil and the Smart Keyboard quickly slipped from late November into December. Some Apple retail stores around the country have been receiving small Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard shipments on a daily basis,

iPad Pro Videos: 4K Video Exporting, Cases and Apple Pencil Tracking

Apple launched the iPad Pro yesterday online and in stores, and early adopters are now receiving their deliveries around the world. The trio of videos below provide a closer look at the iPad Pro, Smart Cover and Silicone Case accessories and a comparison between Apple Pencil and Surface Pen tracking. YouTube creator Jonathan Morrison shared a video called My First Day with the iPad Pro, proving how powerful the iPad Pro's A9X processor and 4GB of RAM are by exporting 30 seconds of 4K video in around only 38 seconds. He also provided a quick rundown of the 12.9-inch tablet's tech specs, benchmarks and camera. Despite his 4K video test, Morrison concludes that the iPad Pro's hardware is mostly unutilized, due to the lack of true professional apps like Final Cut Pro X that take advantage of the processing power. Those apps could arrive in the future, but in the meantime the iPad Pro is essentially a bigger and better iPad Air 2. YouTube channel DarGadgetZ went hands-on with the new Smart Cover and Silicone Case for the iPad Pro, available for $59 and $79 respectively in Charcoal Gray and White. The Smart Cover has its usual magnetic hinge and doubles as a stand, and can be paired with the Silicone Case for full front-and-back coverage. The last video is an Apple Pencil vs. Surface Pen tracking comparison shared with us by GforGames. The 15-second test, slowed down from 120 FPS, shows the Apple Pencil has slightly less input lag compared to the Surface Pen on the Surface Pro 4 when sketching swirls with each stylus. Limited quantities of the iPad Pro are

iPad Pro Tidbits: A9X Outperforms MacBook, Apple Pencil is Weighted, T-Mobile Financing and More

Apple released the iPad Pro on the Apple Online Store and at select Apple Retail Stores and resellers earlier today, and we have rounded up some interesting facts and news announcements surrounding the 12.9-inch tablet. iPad Pro Delivers Notebook-Level Performance Geekbench results show that the iPad Pro's A9X processor is a dual-core chip running at about 2.25 GHz, as reported by Ars Technica. The A9X chip had a 3,233 single-core score and 5,498 multi-score score in browser-based CPU tests, outperforming the iPad Air 2 and other recent iPhones and iPads by a significant margin. iPad Pro also outperformed the 12-inch Retina MacBook, equipped with an Intel Core M dual-core processor clocked at 1.1 to 1.2 GHz, but the A9X chip's CPU performance falls short of devices like the 2015 MacBook Air and Surface Pro 4 with Intel's latest Broadwell or Skylake U-series processors. Ars Technica also shared iPad Pro CPU performance results The iPad Pro's GPU performance is much more impressive, with GFXBench OpenGL test results showing the A9X chip outperformed the 2015 15" Retina MacBook Pro with Intel Iris 5200 integrated graphics, in addition to the 12-inch MacBook, 2015 MacBook Air, 2015 13" Retina MacBook Pro, Surface Pro 4 and all recent iPads.We’re looking at MacBook Air-class CPU performance and MacBook Pro-class GPU performance, so the iPad Pro ought to be able to handle more multitasking features with aplomb as Apple sees fit to add them. Professional 3D apps like AutoCAD and the Complete Anatomy app Apple showed off in September all seem to run just fine, too.A

Jony Ive on Apple Pencil: A 'Natural' and 'Familiar' Extension of Traditional Drawing Tools

Alongside today's launch of the iPad Pro and its Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard accessories, Apple design chief Jony Ive shared his thoughts on the new stylus accessory with The Telegraph. Addressing the device's strong resemblance to an actual pencil, Ive stresses that a familiar and natural feel is key to the user experience.“We hoped if you are used to spending a lot of time using paintbrushes, pencils and pens, this will feel like a more natural extension of that experience - that it will feel familiar,” he says, carefully. “To achieve that degree of very simple, natural behaviour, was a significant technological challenge.”Ive notes how that natural feel increases with usage to the point where the user forgets they are using a piece of technology and is able to simply focus on the task at hand. As an example, he points to his design team, which has experimented with tools other than traditional sketchbooks over the years but is finally finding the iPad Pro with Apple Pencil a natural combination.“Many of us in the design team have worked together for 20 plus years. We’ve always drawn in our sketchbooks, and for the first time - despite flirting with some alternatives a couple of years ago - I’m seeing people starting to use the iPad and Apple Pencil. Our personal experience has been that there are definitely affordances and opportunities now that you have a much more natural and intuitive environment to make marks, there are clearly things you can do sketching and writing on the iPad which you could never dream of doing in the analogue world."The Apple Pencil is

iPad Pro Review Roundup: Powerful Creative Canvas, but Not Quite a PC Replacement

Apple released the iPad Pro online and in stores earlier today, and the embargo has now lifted for hands-on reviews of the new 12.9-inch tablet. The consensus opinion is that the iPad Pro is an excellent device for content creation, with powerful hardware for intensive apps and multitasking, but not quite a PC replacement due to its iOS limitations. The tablet's experience will be better realized once more developers update their apps to take advantage of the larger canvas. From left to right: iPad mini 2, iPad Air 2, iPad Pro (Image: WSJ) iPad Pro reviews praised its large display, which at 2,732×2,048 pixels has a higher resolution than the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display, and most early adopters claim the tablet meets or exceeds its advertised 10-hour battery life. The new Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard also received positive reviews. Ars Technica - Andrew CunninghamIt's best to think of the iPad Pro as a starting point, especially for iOS 9. These multitasking features are still brand-new, and there’s a lot of low-hanging fruit to pick in future iOS 9 revisions and into iOS 10. My biggest gripes with the iPad Pro are with the software rather than the hardware, and that means that most of them can be fixed given enough time and enough feature requests. It took Microsoft three tries to really nail down the Surface Pro concept, and given a couple of iOS updates the iPad Pro has room to grow into a more versatile laptop replacement without necessarily giving up the things that people like about iOS. For the rest of us, there's still the Mac.CNET -