Safari

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'Safari' How Tos

How to Create a New Window From a Link in Safari on iPadOS

In iPadOS, Apple's Split View and Slide Over multitasking features allow you to use one app alongside another app, or view two documents at the same time in the one app. In the case of Safari, Split View or Slide Over can be used to reference two webpages side by side. You can even open a link in another window without navigating away from the original page. Here's how it works. Hold your iPad in landscape orientation. Launch Safari and find a webpage link that you want to open in a separate window. Touch and hold the link so that it pops out of the page, indicating it's selected. Now, drag the link to the edge of the screen, and either let go before it hits the edge to activate Slide Over, or drag it right to the edge to activate Split View mode. Note that you can also touch and hold a link to invoke a contextual menu which includes the option to Open in New Window. In iPadOS, you can also open multiple separate windows in the same app and manage them in an Exposé-style screen. With the app already open, simply tap its icon in the Dock, and iPadOS will reveal all of the open windows for that

How to Disable Content Blockers for a Specific Website in Safari for iOS

Web browsing on your iPhone and iPad is designed to be a smooth and enjoyable experience, and not one cluttered by annoying ads, which can take up valuable screen space, slow down webpage loading times, and eat up valuable bandwidth. That's why Apple's Safari mobile browser includes native support for third-party content blockers. Content blockers prevent ads like popups and banners from loading on websites you visit, and may also disable cookies, beacons, and the like to prevent online tracking and protect your privacy. Occasionally, however, they may insistently block a legitimate page element that you need access to on a particular webpage you regularly visit. If you suspect that a content blocker you installed is disabling a useful webpage element, or you just want to disable all blocking for that specific website, here's how to turn it off. Launch Safari on your iOS device and navigate to the site in question. Tap the "aA" icon in the top-left corner of the screen to reveal the Website View menu. Tap Website Settings. Toggle the switch beside Use Content Blockers to the grey OFF position.Alternatively, if you want to temporarily disable content blockers for all websites, simply tap Turn Off Content Blockers in the Website View

How to Enable Content Blockers in Safari for iOS

Web browsing on your iPhone and iPad is designed to be a smooth and enjoyable experience, and not one cluttered by annoying ads, which can take up valuable screen space, slow down webpage loading times, and eat up valuable bandwidth. That's why Apple added native support for content blockers to its Safari mobile browser. Content blockers offer a simple one-click solution for preventing ads like popups and banners from loading on websites you visit. They can also protect your privacy from online tracking by disabling cookies, beacons, and scripts that sites attempt to load. You can find various free and paid-for third-party content blockers by searching the App Store for "content blockers." Once you've installed a content blocker, simply follow the steps below to activate it, and you should see the benefits almost immediately the next time you browse the web using Safari. Launch the Settings app. Scroll down and tap Safari. Under General, tap Content Blockers. To activate content blockers, toggle the switches next to them to the green ON position. Note that the Content Blockers option doesn't appear in Safari's settings until you've installed at least one third-party content blocker from the App Store. If a content blocker inadvertently blocks a useful web page element that's not ad-related, you can always temporarily disable it. Click here to learn how.

How to Temporarily Disable Content Blockers in Safari for iOS

Web browsing on your iPhone and iPad is designed to be a smooth and enjoyable experience, and not one cluttered by annoying ads, which can take up valuable screen space, slow down webpage loading times, and eat up valuable bandwidth. That's why Apple's Safari mobile browser includes native support for third-party content blockers. Content blockers prevent ads like popups and banners from loading on websites you visit, and may also disable cookies, beacons, and the like to prevent online tracking and protect your privacy. Occasionally, however, they may unintentionally block a page element that you need access to, like a web form, for example. If you suspect that a content blocker you installed is disabling a useful webpage element, or you just want to temporarily disable all blocking in your current browsing session, here's how to turn it off. Launch Safari on your iOS device and navigate to the site in question. Tap the "aA" icon in the top-left corner of the screen to reveal the Website View menu. Tap Turn Off Content Blockers. If you only want to disable content blockers for a specific website, tap Website Settings in the aforementioned Website View menu, and then toggle the switch beside Use Content Blockers to the grey OFF

How to Change Where Safari Files Download in iOS

With the release of iOS 13, Apple added a Download Manager to the mobile version of its Safari browser that's similar to the one found in Safari for Mac and Safari for Windows. It helps you keep track of any currently downloading files and can be used to navigate to the storage location of your downloads. By default, Safari's Download Manager saves files in the "Downloads" section of the Files app, but you can easily customize the storage location by following these steps. Launch the Settings app. Scroll down and tap Safari. Tap Downloads. Choose to store downloaded files in iCloud Drive, On My iPhone, or in another location of your choosing (Other...). The Downloads screen in Safari settings also includes an option to Remove Download List Items automatically After one day (the default), Upon successful download, or Manually.

How to Change When Safari's Downloaded File List is Cleared in iOS

With the release of iOS 13, Apple added a Download Manager to the mobile version of its Safari browser that's similar to the one found in Safari for Mac and Safari for Windows. The feature helps you keep track of any currently downloading files and can also be used to navigate to the storage location of your downloads. By default, the Download Manager file list is cleared after one day, but if you want you can change it so that successfully completed downloads clear immediately, or you can opt to clear the list manually. Here's how. Launch the Settings app. Scroll down and tap Safari. Tap Downloads. Tap Remove Download List Items. Select After one day (the default), Upon successful download, or Manually. By default, Safari's Download Manager saves files in the "Downloads" section of the Files app, but you can easily change this by ticking an alternative storage location in the Downloads settings

How to Access the Download Manager in Safari for iOS

If you've ever used the desktop version of Safari, you'll likely be familiar with the browser's Downloads pane, which helps you keep track of any currently downloading and downloaded files. With iOS 13, Apple has brought a similar feature to the mobile version of its Safari browser in the form of the Download Manager. Now, when you choose to download a file, such as an image or document, a little download icon is displayed in the top right corner of the screen. You can tap the icon to check the status of your downloads, and tapping the magnifying glass next to a file will open its folder location, whether that's on your device or in the cloud. By default, files downloaded in Safari are saved in the "Downloads" section of the Files app, but you can easily customize the storage location: Launch the Settings app, select the Safari section, and tap Downloads. From this screen you can opt to store downloaded files in iCloud Drive, on your iPhone, or in another location of your choosing. The Downloads screen in Safari settings also includes an option to Remove Download List Items automatically After one day (the default), Upon successful download, or Manually.

How to Configure iOS to Auto-Close Safari Browser Tabs

In iOS 13, Apple has added new functionality to its Safari mobile browser that makes it easier for you to manage how many tabs you have open at the same time. The number of active browser tabs in Safari can quickly get out of hand on iPhone because of the way the browser displays tabs in a vertical array when viewed in the popular portrait orientation. Hyperlinks that open websites in a new tab only exacerbate the situation. Using the Close All Tabs option (long pressing Done reveals it) is one solution for restoring order to your browser session, but it's no good if you have a handful of newer tabs that are still useful to have open. Fortunately, iOS 13 can close Safari's browser tabs on your behalf, based on when you last viewed them. Launch the Settings app and select Safari -> Close Tabs, and you'll find options to make the browser automatically close tabs that have not been viewed After One Day, After One Week, or After One Month. Safari also iOS 13 includes a new feature that lets you bookmark multiple tabs in a just couple of taps and save them all in a new or existing bookmark folder. Click here to learn how it works.

How to Access Website Settings in Safari for iOS

With the release of iOS 13, Apple introduces some additional features to its native Safari mobile web browser. One of the most welcome new changes in Safari is the ability to customize a range of settings for individual websites. Like Safari on Mac, the Website Settings section allows you to configure different viewing and security options for specific websites, and Safari then applies them automatically so you don't have to bother with them again. Here's where you can find it. Navigate to a site you frequently visit. Tap the "aA" icon in the top-left corner of the screen to reveal the Website View menu. Tap Website Settings. Reader Mode: Safari's built-in Reader mode strips online articles of extraneous web page content to make them more readable. Reader is usually enabled by tapping an icon that sometimes appears in the far left of the address bar, but you can check "Use Reader Automatically" to switch to this by default. Request Desktop Website: Mobile-friendly websites are often stripped down and streamlined for easier navigation, with the result that some full-page content isn't displayed at all. Even when it is, finding that content can sometimes be a chore, especially if you're used to the desktop version of a site. Fortunately, Apple has had the foresight to let you bypass mobile versions of websites and view original desktop versions on its mobile devices instead. Camera, Microphone, Location: The last three options in Website Settings let you choose whether to allow or deny the site access to your iOS device's camera and microphone, and

How to Bookmark Multiple Open Tabs in Safari for iOS

In Safari on iOS, the number of tabs you have open can quickly get out of hand because of the way the browser displays tabs in a vertical array when viewed in portrait orientation. Using the close all tabs gesture is one solution for restoring order to your browser session, but that's no good if you're not finished looking at the open tabs, especially if you're busy researching a project or a vacation, let's say. Of course, you could always bookmark the open web pages for later reference. But in previous versions of Safari, you would have to bookmark each tab one by one, which could end up taking a while depending on how many were open. Fortunately, Safari in iOS 13 includes a new feature that lets you bookmark multiple tabs in a just couple of taps and save them all in a new or existing bookmark folder. Here's how it works. First off, make sure you have a few tabs open in Safari that you want to reference at a later time. Now, select one of those tabs, and in the main browsing window, long press the Bookmark icon (it looks like an open book). A popup menu will appear at the on the screen from which you can select Add Bookmarks for X Tabs, the X being the number of tabs open. Once you've tapped this option, you'll be asked to save the tabs in a new bookmarks folder (remember to give it a recognizable name). Alternately, you can choose a location from the existing folder list in which to save the tabs. To access your bookmarks in Safari at any time, simply tap the Bookmarks icon in the main browsing interface to reveal all of your saved favorites

How to Hide the Toolbar in Safari for iOS

In the Safari browser for iOS 13, Apple has added a new Website View menu that brings together useful options for browsing web pages, making them less challenging to navigate and easier on the eyes. The Website View menu includes one-tap settings that let you change text size options, request the desktop version of a website, and more. Here we're going to check out the new Hide Toolbar option. In earlier versions of iOS, Safari hides the top and bottom toolbars when scrolling down a web page, and to view them again you have to tap the URL or swipe down on the page. In iOS 13 though, you can get Safari to hide the toolbar completely when navigating a website, which makes for a less disruptive experience. You can find the Website View menu in what's called the Smart Search field at the top of the Safari interface. Launch the app and navigate to a website, then tap the "aA" icon in the upper left corner of the screen. Simply select Hide Toolbar from the dropdown menu, and the toolbar will shrink to show just the URL. This more slimline arrangement will remain while you navigate the website, but you can re-instate the toolbar anytime by tapping the mini URL bar at the top of the

How to Make Text Bigger in Safari for iOS

In the Safari browser for iOS 13, Apple has added a new Website View menu that brings together useful options for browsing web pages, making them less challenging to navigate and easier on the eyes. This article introduces you to the Website View menu's text size controls, which allow you to adjust the font size of a web page. In many cases, these controls work even if the website doesn't natively support zooming. You can find the Website View menu in what's called the Smart Search field at the top of the Safari interface. Launch the app and navigate to a website, then tap the "aA" icon in the upper left corner of the screen. The text zoom options appear at the top of the Web View dropdown menu – tap the smaller A to reduce the zoom percentage and the bigger A to increase it. It's that simple. The great thing about the Website View menu is that Safari will remember your preferences for that specific website and apply it automatically the next time content is loaded from the same parent URL. Helpfully, all the zoom settings you've chosen for specific websites appear in the Settings app: simply tap Page Zoom, which you can find under "Settings for Websites". From here, you can also define the default text zoom level that Safari applies to all other websites that you haven't specifically set a preference for, which should make your general web browsing a more pleasurable experience

How to Perform a Quick Website Search in Safari

There are several ways to search the web in Apple's Safari browser. In this article, we're going to highlight a way of searching specific websites using a lesser-known Safari feature called Quick Website Search. The option is designed to work with sites that have a built-in search field, like the one you can find at the top of the main page at MacRumors.com. Here's how it works. Let's say you want to look up articles on MacRumors that mention device benchmarks. You might do this by typing "macrumors benchmarks" into Safari's address bar to get results from whichever search engine the browser is configured to use. If you're a bit more search savvy, you might even type "site: macrumors.com benchmarks" to limit the search to MacRumors. But ideally you'd just navigate to MacRumors.com and use the search field provided at the top of the page. If you take the latter option and Quick Website Search is enabled, Safari will remember that you've used the MacRumors search field and offer to use it again in future searches that include the website's name. For example, if you typed "macrumors" followed by "deals" directly into Safari's address bar, you could tap the option Search macrumors.com for "deals" in the suggestions box, as shown above, and you'd get instant results from MacRumors' own on-site search function. How to Enable Quick Website Search in iOS The functionality of Quick Website Search depends on how a given site implements its search field, but we've found that it works with most popular websites that offer them, so it's worth making sure you have the

How to View the Desktop Version of a Website on Your iPhone and iPad

Most popular websites these days come in both desktop and mobile versions, with the latter rendering content in a more responsive fashion for a consistent browsing experience across a variety of tablet and smartphone screens. Mobile-friendly websites are often stripped down and streamlined for easier navigation, with the result that some full-page content isn't displayed at all – and even when it is, finding that content can sometimes be a chore, especially if you're used to the desktop version of a site. Recognizing this, Apple has had the foresight to let you bypass mobile versions of websites and view original desktop versions on its mobile devices instead. To request a desktop site on your iPhone and iPad, simply follow these steps. Launch Safari on your iOS device and navigate to the website in question. Long press the Reload button in the far right of the address bar. On iPhone, tap Request Desktop Site at the bottom of the screen. On iPad, the same option appears in the dropdown menu below the Reload button. Note that you can also access this option by tapping the Share button (the square with an arrow pointing out) and selecting Request Desktop Site from the third row of the Share Sheet. With that done, Safari should remember your preference for that particular website and load the desktop version the next time you visit

How to Snap Back to Your Search Results When Browsing in a Safari Tab

Say you want to look up a topic online, so you type a search word or phrase into Safari's address bar. The first link in the returned results looks promising, so you click it. On the site you're sent to, you see another link about a related topic, so you click that, too. Moments later another link grabs your attention, and you check it out. Soon you're distracted by some other tangential subject, and before you know it you've fallen down a rabbit hole of clicks and links without finding out much about what you were actually looking for in the first place. If that sounds familiar, Safari SnapBack can help you. It's a long-standing feature of Apple's desktop web browser that's often overlooked, but saves having to tediously click the previous page button multiple times to return to your original search results, or start rooting through your web history to locate where your latest online meander began. You can find it in Safari's menu bar, under History -> Search Results SnapBack, or even better, use its Command-Option-S keyboard shortcut. As the name suggests, SnapBack instantly takes you back to your original search results, although the function's availability depends on a couple of conditions. First, SnapBack only works if your wayward browsing occurred in the same tab that you used to initiate the search, so if a link you clicked on opened a new tab and you continued browsing in that, the SnapBack menu option will be grayed out. Second, the search needs to be performed from Safari's address bar or from the website of the search engine that Safari is set

How to Make Web Pages in Safari for Mac Easier to Read

In Apple's Safari web browser, there are several ways to make viewing web pages easier on the eyes. All of them involve adjusting the font size or the zoom level that Safari applies when it loads web page content, which can be helpful if you're using a small screen or a large display set at a high resolution. To increase or decrease the zoom level of both text and images when viewing web pages in Safari, press Command and the + (plus) or - (minus) keys. You can also click on View in Safari's menu bar and select Zoom In or Zoom Out. Alternatively, you can add zoom buttons to Safari's interface: Right-click (or Ctrl-click) on a space in the Safari toolbar and click Customize Toolbar.... Then drag the Zoom buttons in the dropdown to the space you just clicked on the toolbar. Click Done to finish. If you want to keep images at the same size and only adjust web page font size on the fly, press Option-Command and the + or - keys. You can also hold down the Option key and click on View in the Safari menu bar, which changes the Zoom options to Make Text Bigger and Make Text Smaller. Safari will remember your zoom and font size settings until you clear your History. To do so, click Safari in the menu bar, select Clear History..., then click the Clear History button.

How to Use Safari's Private Browsing Mode and Delete Your Browsing History

This article explains how to use Safari's Private Browsing mode, which prevents your browsing history from being logged on your Apple devices. It's a useful feature if you're buying gifts online for friends or family, for instance, and you don't want anyone with access to your devices to find out what you're up to. Of course, if you've already been browsing where you shouldn't have and didn't use Safari's dedicated privacy mode, don't worry – we'll also show you two different ways of deleting your existing browsing history. Keep reading to find out how. Using Safari's Private Browsing Mode Enabling Private Browsing limits Safari in three important ways: It prevents the browser from creating a history of the pages you visit, it stops AutoFill information like website usernames and passwords from being remembered, and any tabs you open won't be stored in iCloud. Also, for added peace of mind when you browse privately, Safari automatically prevents cross-site tracking, and requests that sites and third-party content providers don't track you as a rule. Additionally, the privacy mode stops sites from modifying any information stored on your iOS device, and deletes cookies when you close the associated tab. To enable Private Browsing in Safari, follow these steps. Open Safari on your iPhone or iPad, tap the Pages icon (consisting of two squares) to bring up the open tabs view, and then tap "Private". Notice how the interface turns a dark gray. Tap the "+" icon to open a private tab. When you're done browsing, return to the open tabs view, individually

How to Use the New Safari Web Browser Settings in macOS High Sierra

With the public release of macOS High Sierra, Apple introduced some additional features to its native Safari web browser. Here we'll cover just what they are and how you can customize them to make your web browsing experience a more enjoyable one. Individual Website Settings One of the most welcome new changes in Safari 11 is the ability to customize a range of settings for individual websites. Once these options are set up for a site, Safari applies them automatically so you don't have to bother with them again. Here's how. Navigate to a site you frequently visit. Right-click on the URL or website name that appears in the address bar, and select "Settings for This Website". Alternatively, click Safari in the menu bar and you'll see the same option under Preferences. Select your preferences from the drop-down pane that appears below the address bar to control how the website behaves, either by checking the boxes or selecting a setting from the available options.Safari's built-in Reader mode strips online articles of extraneous web page furniture to make them more readable. Reader is usually enabled by clicking an icon that sometimes appears in the far left of the address bar, but you can check "Use Reader when available" to switch to this by default. The box next to "Enable content blockers" lets you set whether to activate any ad-blocking extensions you may have installed, while the Page Zoom setting lets you adjust the size that website fonts and images display, allowing you to make them easier to read and navigate. With the Auto-Play setting, you can

Safari in iOS 11: Enabling Cross-Site Tracking Prevention to Protect Your Privacy

Safari in iOS 11 introduces a new tracking prevention feature that's meant to protect your privacy and make it harder for companies to track your browsing habits across multiple websites. Disabling Cross-Site Tracking isn't going to cut down on the number of ads that you see, but it will make it harder for advertisers to gather data about what you've been browsing to deliver targeted ads. Here's how to enable it: Open the Settings app. Scroll down to Safari and tap it. Scroll down to "Prevent Cross-Site Tracking." Toggle it on so it's green. This section of the Settings app also includes other Safari settings that are worth turning on if you haven't done so already, including "Ask Websites Not to Track Me," "Block Pop-ups," and "Fraudulent Website Warning." You can also restrict website access to cookies, the camera and microphone, and Apple

'Safari' Guides

Safari: What's New in iOS 13

Safari is one of the most important apps on the iPhone and iPad, allowing iOS users to access the web on their devices. Safari is one of the apps that routinely gets updated when new versions of iOS are released, and iOS 13 is no exception. Safari in iOS 13 offers a whole range of useful updates, from an updated start page to a new download manager. Below, we walk through all of the new and important features in Safari in iOS 13. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Revamped Start Page Safari in iOS 13 has a revamped start page (the page that's available when you open a new Safari window or tab) that now incorporates Siri Suggestions and other features. The start page includes access to your favorite websites as usual, but Siri Suggestions will also surface relevant websites in your browsing history along with frequently visited sites, links sent to you in the Messages app, and more. The new start page is designed to let you get to what most interests you quickly, and it makes sure you don't forget to check out websites recommended to you by friends and family. Website View Menu In the Smart Search field where you can search or type in URLs, there's a new icon on the left denoted by two As. Tapping on this icon opens up the new Website View menu, where you can access the following controls: Text Size Options - Adjust the size of the text on the website you're on. Enable Reader View - Enable Reader View on the website you're on, which gets rid of ads and formatting for a clean book-style reading interface. Hide

Protecting Your Privacy in Safari for OS X El Capitan

Every time you visit a website you are sharing information about yourself with the outside world. This article runs through a number of methods you can use to gain more control over what gets shared, and who it gets shared with, whenever you use Apple's Safari browser to access the web on a Mac. It also covers methods you can use to prevent traces of your browsing history from showing up on your computer. While you may trust friends and family not to go searching through your web history, it's possible for them to unintentionally discover what you've been looking at, just by using Safari or performing an innocent search on your Mac. If you're interested in a similar overview covering Safari on iOS, check out this guide. This guide assumes you are using the latest public release of OS X El Capitan (10.11.6 as of initial writing), which you can check by clicking the  symbol in the menu bar at the top left of your screen and selecting "About This Mac". The version number appears beneath the OS X version name. If you're not up to date, you can download and install the latest version of OS X via the Mac App Store located on the Dock or in the Applications folder. Cookies, Location Services, and Tracking Many websites attempt to store cookies and other web page data on computers used to access online content. Cookies are small data files that can include things like your IP address, operating system, web browser version, the date you last visited the site, as well as any personal information you may have provided, such as your name, email address, and any relevant

Protecting Your Privacy in Safari for iOS

Every time you visit a website on your iPhone or iPad, you are sharing information about yourself with the outside world. This guide runs through a number of methods you can use to gain more control over what gets shared, and who it gets shared with, whenever you use Apple's Safari browser to access the web on an iOS device. It also covers some methods you can use to prevent traces of your browsing history from showing up on your iOS devices. While you may trust friends and family not to go searching through your web history, it's possible for them to unintentionally discover what you've been looking at, just by using Safari or performing a simple Spotlight search on your iPhone or iPad. If you're interested in a similar overview covering Safari on OS X, check out this guide. The guide assumes you are using the latest public release of iOS 9.3 (9.3.3 as of initial writing). If your device is running an older version, a message should have appeared on the screen that an update is available. Connect your device to a power source and then tap "Install Now" on the message to download the update over the air, or open the Settings app and tap General -> Software Update, and then tap "Download and Install". Alternatively, connect your device to a computer with an internet connection and with the latest version of iTunes 12 installed. Open iTunes, select your device (a device icon should appear just below the playback controls), click "Summary" in the sidebar, and then click "Check for Update" in the Summary screen. Click "Download and Update" if an update dialog

'Safari' Articles

Apple WebKit Team Publishes Website Tracking Prevention Policy

Apple's WebKit team has published a "WebKit Tracking Prevention Policy" that details a range of anti-tracking measures it has developed and the types of tracking practices it believes are harmful to users. Inspired by Mozilla's anti-tracking policy, the document posted to the WebKit blog provides an insight into the anti-tracking features built into Apple's Safari browser that the team hopes to see in all browsers one day. This document describes the web tracking practices that WebKit believes, as a matter of policy, should be prevented by default by web browsers. These practices are harmful to users because they infringe on a user's privacy without giving users the ability to identify, understand, consent to, or control them.Apple introduced Intelligent Tracking Prevention in iOS 11 and in Safari 11 in macOS High Sierra 10.13 and has been working to develop ITP ever since. For example, in February Apple released iOS 12.2 and Safari 12.1 for macOS, both of which included ITP 2.1 featuring enhancements that block cross-site tracking. The new WebKit policy highlights Apple's continuing efforts to target all forms of cross-site tracking behavior, even if it's in plain view. WebKit will do its best to prevent all covert tracking, and all cross-site tracking (even when it’s not covert). These goals apply to all types of tracking listed above, as well as tracking techniques currently unknown to us. If a particular tracking technique cannot be completely prevented without undue user harm, WebKit will limit the capability of using the technique. For example,

Apple Drops Support for SHA-1 Certificates in macOS Catalina and iOS 13

In a new support document, Apple has indicated that macOS Catalina and iOS 13 drop support for TLS certificates signed with the SHA-1 hash algorithm, which is now considered to be insecure. SHA-2 is now required at a minimum. Apple says all TLS server certificates must comply with these new security requirements in macOS Catalina and iOS 13:TLS server certificates and issuing CAs using RSA keys must use key sizes greater than or equal to 2048 bits. Certificates using RSA key sizes smaller than 2048 bits are no longer trusted for TLS. TLS server certificates and issuing CAs must use a hash algorithm from the SHA-2 family in the signature algorithm. SHA-1 signed certificates are no longer trusted for TLS. TLS server certificates must present the DNS name of the server in the Subject Alternative Name extension of the certificate. DNS names in the CommonName of a certificate are no longer trusted.Effective immediately, any connections to TLS servers violating these new requirements will fail and may cause network failures, apps to fail, and websites to not load in Safari in macOS Catalina and iOS 13, according to Apple. Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla all deprecated SHA-1 certificates in

Apple Previews New Privacy-Focused Ad Tracking Solution Coming to Safari Later This Year

Apple today previewed a new Safari feature called Privacy Preserving Ad Click Attribution that it says will allow advertisers to measure the effectiveness of their ad campaigns on the web without compromising user privacy. In a blog post, WebKit engineer John Wilander explains that ad click attribution has traditionally been done through the use of cookies and so-called "tracking pixels," allowing both the advertiser and the website where the ad was placed to know when someone has clicked on an ad and later purchased something. Wilander says the traditional method of ad click attribution has no practical limit on data, allowing for full cross-site tracking of users using cookies. "We believe this is privacy invasive and thus we are obliged to prevent such ad click attribution from happening in Safari and WebKit," he wrote. Thus, Apple has proposed a modern solution that it says doesn't allow for cross-site tracking of users but does provide a means of measuring the effectiveness of online ads. The feature is built into the browser itself and runs on-device, meaning that the browser vendor does not see any of the ad data. Here is Apple's summary of its privacy considerations for the feature:Only links served on first-party pages should be able to store ad click attribution data. Neither the website where the ad click happens nor the website where the conversion happens should be able to see whether ad click data has been stored, has been matched, or is scheduled for reporting. Ad clicks should only be stored for a limited time, such as a week. The entropy

Two Zero-Day Vulnerabilities Discovered in Safari for Mac on Day One of Pwn2Own Hacking Contest

The 19th annual CanSecWest security conference is underway in Vancouver, Canada, including the annual Pwn2Own hacking contest, and two zero-day security vulnerabilities have so far been discovered in Safari on macOS. The contest kicked off on Wednesday with security researchers Amat Cama and Richard Zhu teaming up against Safari. The duo successfully exploited the browser and escaped the sandbox by using a combination of an integer overflow, heap overflow, and brute force technique, earning them $55,000. Later in the day, a trio of Niklas Baumstark, Luca Todesco, and Bruno Keith targeted Safari with a kernel elevation. They demonstrated a complete system compromise, but it was only a partial win since Apple supposedly already knew of one of the bugs used in the demo. They still netted $45,000. In total, participants were awarded $240,000 on day one of Pwn2Own. Day two of the contest is currently underway. All exploits discovered during the contest are reported to the necessary companies like Apple so they can be

Fun iOS Safari Bug Lets You Trick Your Friends With Fake Website Headlines

You may or may not know this, but there's a feature in Safari that's designed to let you select a portion of text and send it to a friend over Messages using the Share feature in Safari. When researching one of our tips videos, we came across this handy trick, but soon discovered that there's another aspect to it -- one that you can use to create fake website headlines that can be sent to your friends and family. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. As it turns out, there's a bug in the select text and share feature, and it involves the search function on websites. If you type text into the search bar on a website, highlight it, and then share it with the Safari Share Sheet, it will send your written text along with a website link that looks rather official. See the screenshot below: Here are the specific steps to follow to create a fake website title: 1. Go to a website with a search function, such as MacRumors.com. 2. Make sure your iPhone is in landscape mode. 3. Tap on the search bar. 4. Enter your text and then select it. 5. Tap on the Share icon next to the address bar. 6. Select Messages and then type in the name of the person who you want to prank. From there, the person will see the fake website header that you created, but it will look like text from the website itself because the text isn't sent separately due to the rich text feature in Messages. This pretty much only works iPhone to iPhone and won't work if you're sending messages to your friends on Android devices. You can use this trick on the iPad too,

iOS 12.2 and Safari 12.1 for macOS Include Updated Intelligent Tracking Prevention Feature

Safari in the iOS 12.2 beta and Safari 12.1 for macOS High Sierra and Mojave includes an updated version of Intelligent Tracking Prevention, according to details shared on Apple's WebKit blog. ITP 2.1, as Apple is calling it, caps client-side cookie storage to seven days. After this time period, cookies expire. As outlined by Apple, this offers improvements in privacy, security, and performance. From Apple's WebKit blog:- Cross-site trackers have started using first-party sites' own cookie jars for the purpose of persistent tracking. The first-party storage space is especially troublesome for privacy since all tracker scripts in the first-party context can read and write each other's data. Say social.example writes a user tracking ID as a news.example first-party cookie. Now analytics.example, adnetwork.example, and video.example can leverage or cross pollinate that user tracking ID through their scripts on news.example. - Cookies available in document.cookie can be stolen by speculative execution attacks on memory. Therefore, they should not carry sensitive information such as credentials. - Cookies available in document.cookie can be stolen by cross-site scripting attacks. Again, therefore, they should not carry sensitive information such as credentials. - The proliferation of cookies slows down page and resource loads since cookies are added to every applicable HTTP request. Additionally, many cookies have high entropy values which means they cannot be compressed efficiently. We come across sites with kilobytes of cookies sent in every resource request. -

Apple Removes Useless 'Do Not Track' Feature From Latest Beta Versions of Safari

In the release notes for Safari 12.1, the new version of Apple's browser installed in iOS 12.2, Apple says that it is removing support for the "Do Not Track" feature, which is now outdated. From the release notes: "Removed support for the expired Do Not Track standard to prevent potential use as a fingerprinting variable." Do Not Track is no longer an option in iOS 12.2, as seen in iOS 12.2 screenshot on left. iOS 12.1.3 screenshot on right. The same feature was also removed from Safari Technology Preview today, Apple's experimental macOS browser, and it is not present in the macOS 10.14.4 betas. According to Apple, Do Not Track is "expired" and support is being eliminated to prevent its use as, ironically, a fingerprinting variable for tracking purposes. "Do Not Track" is an outdated feature that was added to Safari quite a long time ago, first showing up in OS X Lion in 2011. Proposed by the FTC, "Do Not Track" is a preference that is sent by a user's browser to various websites requesting that advertising companies not use tracking methods. It is entirely up to the advertising companies to comply with the "Do Not Track" messaging, and it has no actual function beyond broadcasting a user preference. All it does is say something to the effect of "hey, I prefer not to be tracked for targeted advertisements," which websites, advertisers, and analytics companies are free to ignore. In the settings for Safari in iOS 12.2, Apple is no longer listing "Do Not Track" as a setting that can be toggled off or on, and in the Safari Preview browser, "Ask websites not

Apple to Limit Accelerometer and Gyroscope Access in Safari on iOS 12.2 for Privacy Reasons

Last month, Apple released iOS 12.2 in beta with several new features, including the Apple News app in Canada, a redesigned TV remote in Control Center, support for adding HomeKit-enabled TVs in the Home app, and more. The upcoming software update also introduces a new Motion & Orientation Access toggle under Settings > Safari > Privacy & Security. Toggled off by default, this new setting must be turned on in order for websites to display features that rely on motion data from the gyroscope and accelerometer in the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. To test this, we loaded the What Web Can Do Today website on an iPhone running the first beta of iOS 12.2. With the Motion & Orientation Access setting toggled on, the page shows real-time accelerometer and gyroscope data from the iPhone. With the setting toggled off, no motion data is shown. Another example is Apple's motion-based iPhone experience site. This page normally allows you to tilt your actual iPhone to swivel the iPhone XS Max on the screen with tech specs. With Motion & Orientation Access toggled off, however, only a static image of the iPhone XS Max is shown without tech specs. This privacy-focused change could be in response to a WIRED report last year that claimed thousands of websites have unmitigated access to motion, orientation, proximity, and light sensor data on mobile devices. Software engineer Felix Krause also filed a radar and notified Apple's security team about this matter in 2017. As noted by Digiday, the setting could have implications for AR/VR advertising:For example,

Still Running OS X Yosemite? Beware, iTunes 12.8.1 Breaks Safari

Apple this week released iTunes 12.8.1 for OS X Yosemite up to macOS High Sierra. The minor update resolves an issue that prevented iTunes from streaming media to third-party AirPlay speakers, and contains other minor improvements. However, anyone running OS X Yosemite 10.10.5 specifically should avoid updating to iTunes 12.8.1 for now, as users across the MacRumors Forums, Twitter, Reddit, and Stack Exchange report that the update somehow breaks Safari 10.1.2, the latest version of the browser for OS X Yosemite. After updating to iTunes 12.8.1, some users have encountered the following error message when opening Safari on OS X Yosemite:Safari cannot be opened because of a problem. Check with the developer to make sure Safari works with this version of Mac OS X. You may have to reinstall the application. Be sure to sure to install any available updates for the application and Mac OS X.One user on Stack Exchange believes that the iTunes 12.8.1 update may update the MobileDevice.framework in /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/ to a version incompatible with Safari 10.1.2, but the cause is not entirely clear. We've flagged the issue with Apple and asked if and when a fix will be available. In the meantime, workarounds include using an alternative browser such as Firefox or upgrading to a newer macOS version — of course, those still using OS X Yosemite likely don't want to or can't upgrade. Updating to iTunes 12.9 is not possible on OS X Yosemite, as that version is only compatible with macOS Mojave. Update - How to Fix Some users have been able to fix

Apple Removes Questionable Web Links From Siri Suggestions

Apple has removed a number of results from Siri Suggested Websites after BuzzFeed highlighted several examples of the feature offering up "debunked conspiracies, shock videos, and false information." Siri Suggested Websites is an optional feature in Safari that serves up auto-completed suggestions based on what the user starts typing into the browser's search bar. Results are curated by Apple and can include links sourced from things like Wikipedia, YouTube, and the iTunes Store. Basically, BuzzFeed News stoked controversy by pointing out that if users typed in, say, "Pizzagate," the Siri feature would return links to YouTube videos by conspiracy theorist peddler David Seaman. From the article: "Such results raise questions about the company's ability to monitor for low-quality information, and provide another example of the problems platforms run into when relying on algorithms to police the internet."Incidentally, the link didn't actually work because YouTube previously removed the video for violating YouTube's terms of service. So whichever way you look at it, Apple's algorithm-driven suggestions aren't doing their job very well. BuzzFeed informed Apple of this and several other "low quality" Siri Suggestions highlighted in the article, and Apple has since removed them. The company also provided the site with the following statement: "Siri Suggested Websites come from content on the web and we provide curation to help avoid inappropriate sites. We also remove any inappropriate suggestions whenever we become aware of them, as we have with these. We will

Apple Releases Safari 12 for macOS Sierra and macOS High Sierra

Apple today released Safari 12 for macOS Sierra and High Sierra, introducing the same Safari improvements that are coming to macOS Mojave in the Safari 12 software bundled with that update. Safari 12 is recommended for all macOS High Sierra users and can be downloaded from the Software Update function in the Mac App Store. Safari 12 brings support for creating and storing strong, unique passwords, flagging reused passwords in Safari Preferences, preventing social media buttons and embedded content from tracking you across websites, and suppressing ad retargeting by limiting the amount of information available about your Mac. Apple's full release notes for the update are below:The Safari 12 update is recommended for all macOS High Sierra users and contains improvements to privacy, compatibility, and security. This update: Adds the ability to view website icons in tabs Automatically suggests and fills a strong, unique password when creating an account or changing a password Flags reused passwords in Safari Preferences Adds support for allowing or blocking pop-ups on specific websites Prevents embedded content and social media buttons from tracking cross-site browsing without permission. Suppresses ad retargeting by reducing advertisers' ability to identify Mac devices uniquely Automatically turns off Safari extensions that negatively impact browsing performance Improves security by only supporting legacy Safari Extensions that have been reviewed by Apple Improves security by discontinuing support for most NPAPI plug-insThe update also

Safari Gains Favicon Support in Tabs on iOS 12 and macOS Mojave

Apple at its WWDC keynote on Monday previewed iOS 12 and macOS Mojave, both of which feature Safari 12. The latest version of Apple's web browser adds long-awaited support for favicons, which are the tiny icons that appear to the left of website page titles, in tabs and the bookmark bar. In many cases, a favicon is a website's or brand's logo. Microsoft was first to support favicons with Internet Explorer in 1999, and Chrome and Firefox have displayed favicons for many years as well, so this was a long time coming for Safari. Apple confirmed the feature on the What's New in Safari page of its website, alongside a handful of other improvements. Favicons may seem like a trivial new feature in Safari 12, but as John Gruber noted last year, many people used Chrome or other alternatives explicitly because Apple's web browser lacked support for the tiny icons.I really can't say this strongly enough: I think Safari's lack of favicons in tabs, combined with its corresponding crumminess when displaying a dozen or more tabs in a window, is the single biggest reason why so many Mac users use Chrome.Favicons are useful because they make tabs more visually distinguishable, especially for users with several tabs open at once. And, in bookmark bars, it is possible to simply display favicons instead of having lengthier website names, allowing for many more bookmarks to fit within the viewable area. Favicons are not displayed by default, so the feature must be enabled in the browser's preferences on Mac or via the Settings app on iOS devices. Mac:Open Safari. Click on

Safari 11.1 in macOS High Sierra 10.13.4 and iOS 11.3 Introduces New Features and Optimizations

Both macOS High Sierra 10.13.4 and iOS 11.3 ship with an updated version of Safari, Safari 11.1. Safari 11.1 incorporates many new features that have been in testing in Apple's Safari Preview browser, introducing new web APIs, security improvements, media changes, and more. Details on the Safari 11.1 update were shared by Apple's Ricky Mondello, and a full change log is available from Apple's developer website. Animated GIFs can be replaced with silent videos in Safari 11.1 to result in smaller downloads, more available colors, and better decoding performance. In iOS 11.3, Password AutoFill for apps works in web views within apps, which will make it easier to log into a site without having to copy and paste your password each time. Web apps that are saved to the Home screen on iOS devices and web pages in SFSafariViewController can also now use the camera to capture images. A new security change provides a "Website Not Secure" warning when a user clicks a credit card field or password entry box on an insecure page, and Intelligent Tracking Prevention, which prevents websites from tracking you around the web, has been improved in Safari 11.1, and there's a new improved Safari Reader extraction engine to improve the Safari Reader experience. Service Workers, new in Safari 11, are designed to allow background scripts to power offline web applications, and there are several other new APIs including Payment Request API, Directory Upload, Beacon API, HTMLImageElement.decode(), and an updated Clipboard API. Safari 11.1 is bundled in to iOS 11.3 and macOS High

Ad Firms Hit Hard by Apple's Intelligent Tracking Prevention Feature in Safari

Internet ad firms are losing out on "hundreds of millions of dollars" following the implementation of anti-tracking features introduced to Safari with iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra, reports The Guardian. One of the largest advertising firms, Criteo, announced in December that Intelligent Tracking Prevention could have a 22 percent net negative impact on its 2018 revenue projections. Other advertising firms could see similar losses, according to Dennis Buchheim of the Interactive Advertising Bureau."We expect a range of companies are facing similar negative impacts from Apple's Safari tracking changes. Moreover, we anticipate that Apple will retain ITP and evolve it over time as they see fit," Buchheim told the Guardian.Intelligent Tracking Prevention techniques were introduced in iOS 11 and in Safari 11 in macOS High Sierra 10.13, both of which were released back in September. Intelligent Tracking Prevention is designed to stop companies from invasively tracking customer web browsing habits across websites. Intelligent Tracking Prevention does not block ads -- it simply prevents websites from being able to track users' browsing habits without their permission. Shortly after the launch of the two new operating systems, advertising groups asked Apple to "rethink" its position and its decision to block cross-site tracking, arguing that Apple would "sabotage the economic model for the internet." An open letter signed by the Data and Marketing Association and the Network Advertising Initiative said the collective digital advertising community was "deeply concerned"

Rite Aid's Website Now Accepts Apple Pay in Safari on Mac, iPhone, and iPad

Rite Aid today announced that it now accepts Apple Pay as a payment method on its desktop and mobile website. iPhone, iPad, and Mac users accessing RiteAid.com through the Safari web browser will now see a "Buy with Apple Pay" option at checkout alongside existing credit card and PayPal payment options. Rite Aid said it is the first pharmacy retailer to accept Apple Pay as a form of payment on the web, with nearly 12,000 items available in its online store. Apple Pay on the web is a convenient and secure option for online payments, eliminating the need to repeatedly fill out account, shipping, and billing information for a more seamless checkout experience. Checking out with Apple Pay on the web requires a Mac, iPhone, or iPad with Touch ID and Safari for macOS Sierra or iOS 10 or later. Rite Aid began accepting Apple Pay at 4,600 of its retail stores across the United States in August 2015, nearly one year after the drug store chain initially disabled support for the mobile payments service nationwide. At the time, Rite-Aid was a member of the Merchant Customer Exchange, a consortium of retailers that planned to launch their own mobile payments service called CurrentC, which was postponed indefinitely last

Apple Collecting Browsing Data in Safari Using Differential Privacy in macOS High Sierra

With the release of macOS High Sierra, Apple is now collecting data from the Safari browser using differential privacy technology, reports TechCrunch. Apple is aiming to gain information about browsing habits to help identify problematic websites that use excessive power or too much memory.This form of data collection is the first of its kind for Safari, aimed at identifying sites that use excessive power and crash the browser by monopolizing too much memory. Apple is also documenting the popularity of these problematic domains, in order to prioritize which sites it addresses first.Apple first announced its adoption of differential privacy in 2016 alongside the debut of iOS 10. Differential privacy is a technique that allows Apple to collect user information while keeping user data entirely private. It uses hashing, subsampling, and noise injection to enable crowd-sourced learning without compromising user privacy. Differential privacy is already in use on Mac and iOS devices for emoji use, search predictions, predictive text, and other small features that use machine learning for improvement. Because of this, Apple does not have a specific message about the new Safari data collection when macOS High Sierra is installed, and it is lumped in with the general Mac analytics data notice that is presented when setting up a new Mac. From Apple's Privacy notice regarding analytics:If you agree to send Mac Analytics information to Apple, it may include the following: - Details about app or system crashes, freezes or kernel panics. - Information about events on your Mac

Safari 11 Released for macOS Sierra and OS X El Capitan

Apple today released Safari 11.0 for macOS Sierra and OS X El Capitan. The update adds new media-related features, plus improvements to privacy, compatibility, and security. Notably, in Safari 11, the web browser blocks videos with audio from automatically playing on most websites. Other new features are outlined in our macOS High Sierra roundup. Stops media with audio from automatically playing on most websites Adds the ability to configure Reader, content blockers, page zoom, and auto-play settings on a per-website basis, or for all websites Improves AutoFill accuracy from Contacts cards Includes updated media controls for HTML video and audio Enhances performance and efficiencySafari 11 was first introduced in macOS High Sierra, which will be publicly released on September 25. Safari 11 is available as a free update within the Mac App

Apple Responds to Safari 11 Criticism From Advertising Groups: 'People Have a Right to Privacy'

Six trade and marketing organizations this morning published an open letter to Apple asking the company to "rethink" plans to launch new versions of Safari in iOS and macOS that block cross-site tracking, and this afternoon, Apple offered up a response, which was shared by The Loop. According to Apple, ad tracking companies are essentially able to recreate a person's web browsing history using cross site tracking techniques sans permission, something it's aiming to stop. "Apple believes that people have a right to privacy - Safari was the first browser to block third party cookies by default and Intelligent Tracking Prevention is a more advanced method for protecting user privacy," Apple said in a statement provided to The Loop. "Ad tracking technology has become so pervasive that it is possible for ad tracking companies to recreate the majority of a person's web browsing history. This information is collected without permission and is used for ad re-targeting, which is how ads follow people around the Internet. The new Intelligent Tracking Prevention feature detects and eliminates cookies and other data used for this cross-site tracking, which means it helps keep a person's browsing private. The feature does not block ads or interfere with legitimate tracking on the sites that people actually click on and visit. Cookies for sites that you interact with function as designed, and ads placed by web publishers will appear normally."In the open letter, signed by the Data and Marketing Association and the Network Advertising Initiative, among others, the collective

Advertising Groups Ask Apple to 'Rethink' New Cookie Tracking Standards in Safari 11

In the upcoming version of Safari 11 on macOS High Sierra, Apple will implement a new "Intelligent Tracking Prevention" feature that builds upon Safari's default blocking of third-party cookies. ITP will greatly limit advertiser reach by placing new safeguards into Safari that use machine learning to suppress cross-site tracking and purge ad retargeting data after 24 hours. In response, six trade and marketing organizations have written an open letter to Apple asking for the Cupertino company to "rethink" its plan to launch Safari with these new "arbitrary" cookie standards (via AdWeek). The organizations argue that the Internet's infrastructure depends on consistent standards for cookies, saying that Apple's new ruleset could "sabotage the economic model for the Internet." On the consumer side of things, the organizations stated that the blocking of cookies in Apple's manner will result in ads that are "more generic" for users, while also being "less timely and useful." The signed organizations include: American Association of Advertising Agencies, American Advertising Federation, Association of National Advertisers, Data & Marketing Association, Interactive Advertising Bureau, and Network Advertising Initiative. We are deeply concerned about the Safari 11 browser update that Apple plans to release, as it overrides and replaces existing user-controlled cookie preferences with Apple’s own set of opaque and arbitrary standards for cookie handling. Apple’s unilateral and heavy-handed approach is bad for consumer choice and bad for the ad-supported online

New Safari Web Browser Features Coming in macOS High Sierra

During last week's keynote at the Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple announced a number of additional features coming to Safari web browser as part of its new macOS High Sierra operating system, due to release in the fall. Apple claims that in its current form Safari is the fastest web browser in macOS when compared with Chrome and Firefox, but it is promising even more speed and better power efficiency in High Sierra. One of the most welcome new features that was announced at WWDC is Autoplay blocking. This prevents websites from playing video the moment you visit a page, which should make browsing a lot less infuriating. As of the High Sierra developer beta, the feature is enabled by default for all sites, but can be specified on a per site basis by the user. Another new Safari feature that Apple is introducing is called Intelligent Tracking Prevention. (This appears in iOS 11 under the Safari setting "Try to Prevent Cross-Site Tracking".) Safari was one of the first browsers to include mechanisms that try to prevent cross-site tracking – blocking of third-party cookies is a default Safari behavior – but elaborate API methods have been employed to overtake those efforts in the intervening years. Apple's own testing has found that popular websites can harbor more than 70 cross-site tracking and third-party cookie trackers that all silently collect data on users while making the browsing experience increasingly sluggish. To solve this, Apple's new feature uses local machine learning to identify cookie types and partition them or purge the cross-site