FaceTime

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'FaceTime' How Tos

How to Turn Off FaceTime on iPhone, iPad, and Mac

There's a serious bug affecting FaceTime right now, which lets someone who calls you hear the audio on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac even if you don't answer the call. There does not appear to be any way to avoid getting these unwanted calls, short of turning off FaceTime. Luckily, it's easy to do. How to Turn Off FaceTime on Your iPhone and iPad Open the Settings app. Scroll down to FaceTime. Click on the toggle next to "FaceTime." This will turn off FaceTime on your specific device, but you will need to deactivate FaceTime on all of your iPhones and iPads to avoid unwanted spy calls if you use FaceTime connection methods other than a phone number. How to Turn Off FaceTime on macOS Open up the FaceTime app. Click on "FaceTime" in the menu bar. Select "Turn FaceTime Off." You can also choose "Preferences" and deselect "Enable this account to deactivate FaceTime. With FaceTime disabled, no one will be able to secretly FaceTime call you to listen to your audio. With FaceTime enabled, anyone can exploit a Group FaceTime bug to place a call to you that will allow them to listen to your audio even if you don't accept the FaceTime

How to Capture a Live Photo in FaceTime on iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra

iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra bring Live Photos to FaceTime, allowing you to preserve a special memory while video chatting with friends and family. Whenever you use the new Camera button that's at the bottom of the screen on a FaceTime call, it captures a photo, but don't worry - this can't be done in secret and the other party is always notified when an image is captured. How to Take a Live Photo in FaceTime Initiate a FaceTime video call. While in the call, press on the camera button that's located at the bottom of the display to the left of the red button for ending a call. Pressing the camera button captures a photo from the camera of the person you're chatting with, so if they have the front-facing camera on, you'll get a full image of their face as if they had taken the photo themselves. The Live Photo taken from the FaceTime call can then be found in the Photos app along with the rest of your photos. Every time you take a Live Photo in FaceTime, the person on the other end of the video call receives a message letting them know that a Live Photo was taken, so capturing an image during FaceTime isn't something that can be done in secret. FaceTime Live Photos also don't capture audio. Disable Live Photos in FaceTime If you don't want people to be able to take a Live Photo when FaceTiming with you, it's easy to disable. Here's how: Open the Settings app. Scroll down to the "FaceTime" option and tap it. Toggle off "FaceTime Live Photos." With this setting toggled off, people you chat with will not be able to use the Live Photo in

'FaceTime' Articles

Attention Correction Feature in iOS 13 Beta Enables Appearance of Eye Contact During FaceTime Calls [Updated]

A new feature in the latest iOS 13 beta makes users appear as if they're looking directly at the camera to make eye contact during FaceTime calls, when actually they're looking away from the camera at the image of the other person on their screen. The FaceTime Correction Feature as demoed by Will Sigmon (@Wsig) The new "FaceTime Attention Correction" feature, first spotted by Mike Rundle on Twitter, can be turned on and off in the FaceTime section of the Settings app, although it only appears to work on iPhone XS and XS Max devices in the third ‌iOS 13‌ beta sent out to developers on Tuesday. Why the feature is limited to these devices right now remains unknown. It clearly relies on some form of image manipulation to achieve its results, so maybe the software algorithms require the more advanced processing power of Apple's latest devices. Rundle predicted in 2017 that FaceTime attention correction would be introduced by Apple in "years to come," but its apparent inclusion in ‌iOS 13‌, due to be released this fall, has surprised and impressed him. For more details on the many features coming to iPhones with ‌iOS 13‌, be sure to check out our comprehensive MacRumors roundup. Update: As demonstrated by Dave Schukin, the feature uses ARKit depth maps to adjust eye position to make it appear the user is looking at the camera. How ‌iOS 13‌ FaceTime Attention Correction works: it simply uses ARKit to grab a depth map/position of your face, and adjusts the eyes accordingly.Notice the warping of the line across both the eyes and nose. pic.twitter.com/U7PMa4o

Apple Wins Lawsuit Over Group FaceTime Eavesdropping Bug

Back in January, there was a major FaceTime bug that allowed a person to force a FaceTime connection with another person, providing access to the user's audio and sometimes video even when the FaceTime call was not accepted. The bug led to a lawsuit from Houston lawyer Larry Williams II, who claimed that the vulnerability allowed an unknown person to listen in on sworn testimony during a client deposition. Williams filed his lawsuit in January, just a day after the bug was publicized, and yesterday, a court ruled in Apple's favor and dismissed the case. The court did not find Williams' argument that the FaceTime vulnerability was "unreasonably dangerous" to be valid, nor did the court believe that he provided sufficient evidence to prove that Apple knew of the defect.Williams's petition does not allege facts about any available alternative design. He fails to allege facts about the iOS 12.1 software as to whether the defect that allegedly allowed a third party to "eavesdrop" on his group FaceTime call was "unreasonable" for the product's ordinary use. Williams's generalized allegation that the iOS 12.1 software was "unreasonably dangerous" and caused him injury falls short of the Rule 8 threshold. Williams's petition recites the pleading elements, but it does not allege facts that could show Apple's knowledge of the defect or that Apple could reasonably have foreseen that an unknown third party would listen to Williams's group FaceTime call without his permission. Williams's claim also fails because he did not state facts that could show that Apple's alleged

Group FaceTime Bug Fix Included in iOS 12.2 Beta 3

The third beta of iOS 12.2, released to developers this morning, includes a fix for the Group FaceTime bug, which also reenables Group FaceTime on devices running the iOS 12.2 beta. Apple addressed the Group FaceTime bug in the iOS 12.1.4 update released on February 7, but there has been no new iOS 12.2 beta until today, so the Group FaceTime feature has remained unavailable to iOS 12.2 users because the server has been offline. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. The FaceTime bug allowed someone to spy on you without your permission or knowledge. By exploiting the bug, a person could initiate a Group FaceTime call with you and then add themselves to the call again to force a Group FaceTime connection, as demoed in the video below. When the Group FaceTime connection was forced using this method, the bug caused the person to be able to hear the audio on your end, even if you did not answer the call. In fact, on your end, it would continue to look like the standard incoming FaceTime call interface. In some situations, if you pressed the side button to silence a call, it would even give the person access to your video. Given the severity of the bug, Apple took its Group FaceTime server offline while preparing the iOS 12.1.4 update. Group FaceTime was reinstated on devices running iOS 12.1.4, but it does not work on iOS 12.2 beta 2 or devices with iOS 12.1.3 or earlier installed. It should be noted that Group FaceTime is still somewhat broken following the update. In iOS 12.1.4, there is no option to add a person to a one on one Group

Group FaceTime Still Partly Broken After Security Update, Apple Aware

A few weeks ago, Apple's Group FaceTime was discovered to have a major security flaw which potentially allowed users to listen in on others without their permission. The flaw was quickly publicized forcing Apple to shut down FaceTime servers temporarily while a patch was being created. A week later, Apple released iOS 12.1.4 which addressed the security issue and re-enabled Group FaceTime for those users. Unfortunately, Group FaceTime even under iOS 12.1.4 hasn't quite been restored to its former functionality. A MacRumors forum thread started the day after 12.1.4's release revealed users who found themselves unable to add more users to a FaceTime call. As it turns out, it appears that users are no longer able to add a person to a one-on-one FaceTime call. The "Add Person" button remains greyed out and inactive in this situation. The only way to add another person to a Group FaceTime call at this time is to start the call with at least two other people. This slight distinction appears to be the source of confusion for many users. MacRumors forum user Bob-K persisted in his support calls with Apple, and was finally told that the "Add Person" button not working in that situation was a known issue and that they didn't know when it would be fixed. Apple Support on Twitter also appears to be aware of this restriction: That's good. Also, note that Group FaceTime calls need to be started with at least two additional users in the FaceTime app. Meet us in DM if you're still having an issue with more users: https://t.co/GDrqU22YpT— Apple Support (@AppleSupport) Februa

Texas Software Engineer Daven Morris Also Reported FaceTime Bug to Apple One Day Before it Made Headlines

In a support document outlining the security content of iOS 12.1.4, Apple credited both 14-year-old Grant Thompson of Catalina Foothills High School in Tucson, Arizona and Daven Morris of Arlington, Texas with reporting a major Group FaceTime bug to the company that allowed users to eavesdrop on others. Thompson and his mother are widely known for being the first people to discover and report the bug to Apple, over a week before it made headlines on January 28, but nothing was known about Morris until now. The Wall Street Journal today shared a few details about Morris, noting he is a 27-year-old software engineer who reported the bug to Apple on January 27, several days after the Thompsons but one day before it made headlines. He apparently discovered the bug a week earlier while planning a group trip with friends. Apple on Thursday said it will compensate the Thompson family for finding and reporting the bug and make an additional gift toward Grant Thompson's education. Apple hasn't disclosed the exact sums of the donations. It's unclear if Morris will also be compensated by the company for reporting the bug. In a statement issued to MacRumors, Apple apologized for the bug a second time and assured customers that it has been fixed in iOS 12.1.4, as has a previously unreported vulnerability in the Live Photos feature of FaceTime:Today's software update fixes the security bug in Group FaceTime. We again apologize to our customers and we thank them for their patience. In addition to addressing the bug that was reported, our team conducted a thorough security

Apple's iOS 12.1.4 Update Also Fixes Live Photos Vulnerability, FaceTime Bug Reporter to Receive Bounty and Gift Toward Education

Following the release of iOS 12.1.4, Apple today issued an apology to customers and said that it had found and fixed the Group FaceTime bug and an additional security vulnerability involving Live Photos in the FaceTime app. From a statement provided to MacRumors:Today's software update fixes the security bug in Group FaceTime. We again apologize to our customers and we thank them for their patience. In addition to addressing the bug that was reported, our team conducted a thorough security audit of the FaceTime service and made additional updates to both the FaceTime app and server to improve security. This includes a previously unidentified vulnerability in the ‌Live Photos‌ feature of FaceTime. To protect customers who have not yet upgraded to the latest software, we have updated our servers to block the ‌Live Photos‌ feature of FaceTime for older versions of iOS and macOS."Going forward, Apple says that the ‌Live Photos‌ feature will not be available in FaceTime on older versions of iOS and macOS. Capturing a Live Photo will require iOS 12.1.4 or the new version of macOS 10.14.3. Apple is also restricting Group FaceTime from devices running earlier versions of iOS. Apple in a security document released this morning outlines the specific fixes that were implemented in iOS 12.1.4 and the macOS 10.14.3 supplemental update. Apple fixed a logic issue that existed in the handling of Group FaceTime calls with improved state management, and the Group FaceTime testing led to the discovery of the ‌Live Photos‌ issue. Apple says that the ‌Live Photos‌ bug was fixed with

iOS 12.1.4 Now Available With Group FaceTime Bug Fix

Apple today released a new iOS 12.1.4 update for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, with the new software designed to fix an insidious privacy-invading Group FaceTime bug that could be exploited to eavesdrop on conversations. The new iOS 12.1.4 software can be downloaded on all eligible devices over-the-air using the Settings app. To download it, go to Settings --> General --> Software update. Though Apple's release notes for the update list "security updates" without going into specifics, the issue that's being fixed here is the Group FaceTime vulnerability. After the bug was widely publicized last week, Apple promised a fix, which was delayed to this week. The FaceTime bug allowed someone to spy on you without your permission or knowledge. By exploiting the bug, a person could initiate a FaceTime call with you and then add themselves to the call again to force a Group FaceTime connection. When this happened, the bug caused the person to be able to hear the audio on your end, despite the fact that the call was never answered and still looked like a standard FaceTime incoming call interface. In some situations, if you pressed the side button to silence a call, it would even give the person access to your video. It was a serious bug, so serious that Apple took its entire Group FaceTime server offline as the company took the time to prepare the iOS 12.1.4 update. The Group FaceTime bug was publicized last Monday and Group FaceTime has been offline since then. The Group FaceTime bug may have required some major under-the-hood changes to FaceTime given that

Apple Fixing FaceTime Eavesdropping Bug in iOS 12.1.4 Update Coming Today

Apple is today releasing an updated version of iOS 12.1.4, which is designed to address a major FaceTime bug that was widely publicized last Monday. The new update comes two weeks after the launch of iOS 12.1.3, an update that introduced bug fixes. The iOS 12.1.4 update will be available on all eligible devices over-the-air in the Settings app. To access the update, go to Settings --> General --> Software Update. Apple typically releases new iOS software at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time or 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time, so that's when the update should become available. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. With this update, Apple is fixing an insidious FaceTime bug that could allow someone to spy on you without your permission or knowledge. By exploiting this bug, someone could force a FaceTime call with you, giving them access to your iPhone, iPad, or Mac's audio or video even without you accepting the FaceTime call. To do this, all someone needed to do was initiate a FaceTime call with you and then add their own phone number to the FaceTime call to convert it to a Group FaceTime call, which, apparently, forces a FaceTime connection. From there, the person would be able to hear your audio, even though on your end, it would look like the call hadn't been accepted. If you hit the power button to make the call go away, it would give the person access to your camera. In our testing, the bug was able to be initiated on iPhones running both iOS 12.2 and iOS 12.1.3, and it affected iPhones, Macs, and iPads running the latest version of Apple's

U.S. Committee Sends Letter to Tim Cook Asking for Answers About Group FaceTime Eavesdropping Flaw

The U.S. Committee on Energy & Commerce is now seeking answers from Apple over the Group FaceTime flaw that allowed people to eavesdrop on conversations. Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone Jr. (D-NJ) and Consumer Protection and Commerce Subcommittee Chairwoman Jan Schakowsky (D-IL) today sent a letter [PDF] to Apple CEO Tim Cook questioning the company about how long it took Apple to address the Group FaceTime flaw, the extent to which the flaw compromised consumer privacy, and whether there are other undisclosed bugs in existence. "While these are wonderful tools when used right, the serious privacy issue with Group FaceTime demonstrates how these devices can also become the ultimate spying machines. That is why it is critical that companies like Apple are held to the highest standards," Pallone and Schakowsky wrote to Cook. "Your company and others must proactively ensure devices and applications protect consumer privacy, immediately act when a vulnerability is identified, and address any harm caused when you fail to meet your obligations to consumers."The two representatives ask Apple to be transparent about the investigation into the Group FaceTime vulnerability, and the steps that are being taken to protect consumer privacy going forward. Apple has not been as transparent as "this serious issue requires," according to the letter. Pallone and Schakowsky ask Apple a number of key questions, including the following: When did your company first identify the Group FaceTime vulnerability that enabled individuals to access the camera and microphone of

Group FaceTime Will Remain Permanently Disabled on iOS 12.1.3 and Earlier

Apple today issued an apology for its major FaceTime security bug that allowed for eavesdropping on calls. "We have fixed the Group FaceTime security bug on Apple's servers and we will issue a software update to re-enable the feature for users next week," said Apple in a statement issued to MacRumors and other media outlets. For absolute clarity, we've since confirmed that this means Group FaceTime will remain permanently disabled on iOS 12.1 through iOS 12.1.3. To access Group FaceTime, users will need to update their iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch to a software update coming next week that is likely to be iOS 12.1.4. Apple disabled Group FaceTime within hours of the bug making headlines, instantly preventing the bug from working. Widely publicized on Monday, the FaceTime bug allowed one person to call another person via FaceTime, slide up on the interface and enter their own phone number, and automatically gain access to audio from the other person's device without that person accepting the call. In some cases, even video was accessible. Apple's full statement issued to MacRumors:We have fixed the Group FaceTime security bug on Apple's servers and we will issue a software update to re-enable the feature for users next week. We thank the Thompson family for reporting the bug. We sincerely apologize to our customers who were affected and all who were concerned about this security issue. We appreciate everyone's patience as we complete this process. We want to assure our customers that as soon as our engineering team became aware of the details necessary

Apple Apologizes About FaceTime Bug, Software Update With Fix Delayed Until Next Week

Apple issued the following statement to MacRumors today in which it apologized for a major FaceTime eavesdropping bug:We have fixed the Group FaceTime security bug on Apple's servers and we will issue a software update to re-enable the feature for users next week. We thank the Thompson family for reporting the bug. We sincerely apologize to our customers who were affected and all who were concerned about this security issue. We appreciate everyone's patience as we complete this process. We want to assure our customers that as soon as our engineering team became aware of the details necessary to reproduce the bug, they quickly disabled Group FaceTime and began work on the fix. We are committed to improving the process by which we receive and escalate these reports, in order to get them to the right people as fast as possible. We take the security of our products extremely seriously and we are committed to continuing to earn the trust Apple customers place in us.Widely publicized on Monday, the FaceTime bug allowed one person to call another person via FaceTime, slide up on the interface and enter their own phone number, and automatically gain access to audio from the other person's device without that person accepting the call. In some cases, even video was accessible. We demonstrated the bug in a video earlier this week: Apple disabled Group FaceTime as a temporary server-side solution, preventing the bug from working any longer. Apple is also working on a software update with a permanent fix that it originally said would be available this week, but it has

Apple's iOS 12.1.4 Update to Fix FaceTime Eavesdropping Bug Showing Up in Analytics

Apple's upcoming fix for the FaceTime eavesdropping bug that was discovered on Monday will come in the form of an iOS 12.1.4 update, according to MacRumors analytics data. We began seeing a handful of visits from devices running an iOS 12.1.4 update on January 29, the day after the bug was widely publicized and spread across the internet. Apple on Monday said that a software fix for the issue would come "later this week," but now that it's Thursday, there's not a lot of time left. Apple could still release the update later today, but if not, Friday morning is the likely target launch date. The FaceTime eavesdropping bug allowed iPhone users to exploit a privacy-invading Group FaceTime flaw that let one person connect to another person and hear conversations (and see video, in some cases) without the other person ever having accepted the call. The FaceTime bug in action Apple has put a stop to the FaceTime bug by disabling Group FaceTime server side, leaving the feature unavailable, but questions remain about how long the bug was accessible and how long Apple knew about it before attempting a fix. The mother of the teenager who originally discovered the bug shared convincing evidence that she contacted the Cupertino company as early as January 20. She did not receive a response from Apple despite sending emails and a video. It's not clear, therefore, when the right team at Apple learned of the bug and when work on a fix was started. We did not see signs of iOS 12.1.4 in our analytics data prior to January 29, but it's possible Apple was working on a fix

Canadian Law Firm Applies for Class Action Lawsuit Over FaceTime Bug

Montréal-based law firm Lambert Avocat Inc. has applied for a class action lawsuit against Apple with the Superior Court of Québec, seeking compensation for all persons exposed to a major FaceTime privacy bug that enabled users to eavesdrop on the people they call, according to its website. The proposed lawsuit seeks compensation for all Canadians who used FaceTime on an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch running iOS 12.1 or later, or a Mac running macOS Mojave 10.4.1 or later, in their possession. This is the first pending class action lawsuit against Apple we know of in relation to the FaceTime bug. An earlier lawsuit filed by a lawyer in Houston, who claimed the bug allowed an unknown person to listen in on sworn testimony, did not seek class action status according to the court document we reviewed. Due to the serious privacy implications of the FaceTime bug, there may be more class action lawsuits to follow in the United States and elsewhere. Widely publicized on Monday, the FaceTime bug allowed one person to call another person via FaceTime, slide up on the interface and enter their own phone number, and automatically gain access to audio from the other person's device without that person accepting the call. In some cases, even video was accessible. We recorded a demonstration of the bug earlier this week: Subscribe to MacRumors on YouTube for more videos Apple disabled Group FaceTime as a temporary server-side solution, preventing the bug from working any longer, while it prepares a software update with a permanent fix that will be released "later this

New York Officials Investigating Apple's FaceTime Eavesdropping Bug

New York Attorney General Letitia James and Governor Andrew Cuomo are investigating the FaceTime eavesdropping bug on iOS devices that allowed a person to FaceTime another person and hear conversations and see videos even when the call was not answered. According to Bloomberg, the New York officials will be focusing on Apple's failure to warn consumers about the bug and its slow response. How the FaceTime eavesdropping bug worked The FaceTime eavesdropping bug was widely publicized on Monday, and several hours after information on how to execute the exploit spread, Apple disabled the Group FaceTime servers."This FaceTime breach is a serious threat to the security and privacy of the millions of New Yorkers who have put their trust in Apple and its products over the years," James said in the statement on Wednesday. "We need a full accounting of the facts to confirm businesses are abiding by New York consumer protection laws and to help make sure this type of privacy breach does not happen again," Cuomo said in the statement.Apple is planning to release a software fix that will solve the bug and will allow the company to bring Group FaceTime back online. That update is expected sometime this week. While the glitch was not widely known until Monday afternoon, Apple was informed about the bug more than a week prior. The person who contacted Apple said that Apple did not respond to multiple attempts to notify the company about the issue. It's not entirely clear if Apple knew about the bug and was working on a fix internally at the time that it became widespread,

Apple Hit With Lawsuit Over FaceTime Eavesdropping Bug

Apple is already facing its first lawsuit over the FaceTime eavesdropping bug that was discovered just last night, reports Bloomberg. Houston lawyer Larry Williams II today filed a lawsuit against Apple claiming that his iPhone allowed an unknown person to listen in on sworn testimony during a client deposition. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. He is suing Apple for unspecified punitive damages for negligence, product liability, misrepresentation, and warranty breach. The bug, says Williams, violates the privacy of a person's "most intimate conversations without consent." The FaceTime bug in question was widely publicized yesterday after making the rounds on social media. By exploiting a bug in Group FaceTime, a person could force a FaceTime connection with another person, providing access to a user's audio and sometimes video even when the FaceTime call was not accepted. There was no way to avoid malicious FaceTime calls forced to connect in this manner short of turning off FaceTime, but after the issue received attention, Apple disabled Group FaceTime server side, and the feature remains unavailable. With Group FaceTime turned off, the exploit is not available and no one is in danger of being spied on via their Apple devices through the FaceTime bug. Apple is planning to implement a fix via a software update later this week, but the company has not commented on how long this bug was available before it was widely shared. Group FaceTime has been available since iOS 12.1 was released in October. A woman whose teenage son

Apple Was Apparently Notified About Major FaceTime Eavesdropping Bug Over a Week Ago [Updated]

While it only made the news yesterday, it appears Apple was alerted to a major FaceTime privacy bug over a week ago. Twitter user MGT7500 tagged the official Apple Support account in a January 20 tweet claiming that her 14-year-old son discovered a "major security flaw" that allowed him to "listen in to your iPhone/iPad without your approval." The user also tagged Tim Cook on the issue in a follow-up tweet on January 21. My teen found a major security flaw in Apple’s new iOS. He can listen in to your iPhone/‌iPad‌ without your approval. I have video. Submitted bug report to @AppleSupport...waiting to hear back to provide details. Scary stuff! #apple #bugreport @foxnews— MGT7 (@MGT7500) January 21, 2019 @tim_cook This is real...trying to get Apple’s attention to get this addressed. I’m just a mom of a teenager who found a huge problem in your new update. I’ve verified it myself...someone from Apple should respond to us. https://t.co/S6qyXts6GF— MGT7 (@MGT7500) January 21, 2019 Once the bug started making headlines on Monday, the Twitter user then shared additional tweets claiming that they had also emailed Apple's product security team over a week ago. A screenshot of the email was shared, and it appears the team did respond, but what they said is not visible in the screenshot. One of many emails sent to Apple 1 week ago attempting to report the Group FaceTime bug. @cnbc @cnn @foxnews @9to5mac pic.twitter.com/l9IFMZmKh6— MGT7 (@MGT7500) January 29, 2019 FYI- I called, FB messaged, faxed, emailed and tweeted Apple exhaustively last week to no avail. Submitted

Apple Disables Group FaceTime as Temporary Workaround to Major Privacy Bug

Apple appears to have disabled Group FaceTime on its server side as a temporary workaround for a major bug discovered today that allowed anyone who places a FaceTime call to listen to audio from the recipient without them answering the call. The bug even extended to video in some circumstances. As spotted by Mark Gurman, Apple's system status page now says "Group FaceTime is temporarily unavailable" as of 7:16 p.m. Pacific Time. Apple killed FaceTime conferencing server side it seems. Right move. pic.twitter.com/H23W2tirgr— Mark Gurman (@markgurman) January 29, 2019 As a result, it is no longer possible to add your personal phone number to a Group FaceTime call, which was the underlying cause of the bug. Multiple editors on our team have confirmed being unable to add a phone number to a FaceTime call. One-on-one FaceTime calls continue to work normally. Apple has promised to release a software update that permanently addresses the bug "later this week," and given the serious privacy implications, the company likely has engineers working on the update as we speak. Group FaceTime is limited to iOS 12.1 and

FaceTime Bug That Lets People Spy on Others Demoed in Video [Updated]

There's a major issue affecting FaceTime right now, which all MacRumors readers should be aware of. A bug with Group FaceTime can let someone force a FaceTime call with you, giving them access to your iPhone, iPad, or Mac's video and audio even when you don't accept the FaceTime call. In the video below, we demonstrate how the bug works. We do not condone MacRumors readers invading peoples' privacy, and these video is meant to make it clear how simple it is to exploit this bug to emphasize its seriousness. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. As outlined in our original post on the issue, this FaceTime bug is very easy to exploit. All someone needs to do is call you and then add their own number to the FaceTime call to force a connection with you. From there, they can hear your audio, even though on your end, it looks like the call wasn't accepted yet. If you hit the power button to make the call go away, it gives the person on the other end access to your camera. This bug can be initiated on an iPhone and it affects iOS and macOS devices running current software, including iOS 12.2. This is a huge privacy issue and while Apple says a fix is coming "later this week," iPhone and Mac users concerned about spying should turn off FaceTime all together. Enabling Do Not Disturb also appears to work as a preventative measure. Update: Apple appears to have temporarily addressed the issue by disabling Group FaceTime calls server side. On Apple's System Status page, Group FaceTime is listed as unavailable.

Apple to Fix Major FaceTime Bug That Lets People Covertly Hear Your Audio and See Your Video 'Later This Week' [Updated]

Apple is planning to address a major FaceTime bug that allows anyone who FaceTimes you see the audio and video from your iPhone or iPad even if you don't answer the call. In a statement made to Axios, Apple said it was aware of the issue and has identified a fix that will be "released in a software update later this week." It's not clear when "later this week" is, but Apple will presumably address the bug as quickly as possible because it us a huge privacy violation. While it was originally thought that it only allowed someone who called to hear your FaceTime audio, pressing the power button on a device also allows video to be seen. These FaceTime calls can be made covertly and are super easy to initiate, requiring only a few steps as outlined in our original post on the subject. All you need to do is initiate a FaceTime call and add your own number to it while it's ringing, forcing a connection with another person. There is no way to stop someone from using FaceTime this way other than disabling FaceTime on your devices. Update: Apple appears to have temporarily addressed the issue by disabling Group FaceTime calls server side. On Apple's System Status page, Group FaceTime is now listed as unavailable.

Serious FaceTime Bug Lets You Hear a Person's Audio Before They Answer [Update: And See Video]

There's a major bug in FaceTime right now that lets you connect to someone and hear their audio without the person even accepting the call. This bug is making the rounds on social media, and as 9to5Mac points out, there are major privacy concerns involved. You can force a FaceTime call with someone and hear what they're saying, perhaps even without their knowledge. We tested the bug at MacRumors and were able to initiate a FaceTime call with each other where we could hear the person on the other end without ever having pressed the button to accept the call. To exploit the bug, all you have to do is add your own phone number to a FaceTime call you've already initiated, which apparently creates a major FaceTime issue. These are the steps: 1. Initiate a FaceTime call with someone. 2. While the call is ringing, swipe up from the bottom of the display. 3. Tap on the "Add Person" button. 4. Add your own phone number when it asks for the number of the person to add. Adding your own phone number to Group FaceTime a second time causes the call between both parties to connect. You can hear the person on the other end and they can hear you, even though the call wasn't accepted. What it looks like when you initiate a Group FaceTime call using this bug. With this screen up, you can hear the audio of the person on the other end. When you force a connection this way, your screen looks like a standard Group FaceTime call sans video, but on the other person's screen, it still looks like the call hasn't been accepted. This is what it looks like for the person