Phil Schiller

Phil Schiller's official title is senior vice president of worldwide marketing at Apple, but his responsibilities go beyond the marketing of Apple products. He's had a key influence on Apple devices ranging from the iPod to the iPhone, and in 2015, he became responsible for overseeing the App Store.

Schiller, a member of Apple's executive team, joined the company in 1987, left in 1993, and re-joined in 1997 when Steve Jobs returned to Apple. Phil Schiller is one of the faces of Apple and is often onstage during events to present new products and software.

'Phil Schiller' Articles

Apple Marketing Chief Phil Schiller: 'One Need Never Pluralize Apple Product Names'

Apple executive Phil Schiller gave Apple users a grammar lesson on Twitter yesterday afternoon, explaining that it isn't necessary to pluralize Apple product names. Schiller's instructions came after a discussion on pluralizing "iPad Pro" between Andreessen Horowitz partner Benedict Evans and iMore analyst Michael Gartenberg. Evans referred to more than one iPad Pro as "iPads Pro," while Gartenberg said "iPad Pros." Schiller clarified that neither approach was correct. The proper way to refer to more than one iPad Pro is to call them "iPad Pro devices." @Gartenberg @BenedictEvans @stevesi @macintux One need never pluralize Apple product names. Ex: Mr. Evans used two iPad Pro devices.— Philip Schiller (@pschiller) April 28, 2016 He went on to further state that it would be correct to say "I have 3 Macintosh," or "I have 4 Macintosh computers" when referring to more than one Mac. "Words can be both singular and plural, such as deer and clothes," he explained. By that logic, more than one iPhone would need to be referred to as iPhone devices or iPhone models rather than "iPhones." As Business Insider points out, Apple sometimes breaks its own naming rules. In press releases, the company has made mention of "iPhones" in the plural

Jeff Williams Named Apple COO, Phil Schiller Takes Over App Store Leadership

Apple has announced an executive shakeup today that sees Jeff Williams promoted to Chief Operating Officer and marketing chief Phil Schiller taking over App Store leadership across all Apple platforms. Williams, who joined Apple in 1998 as head of worldwide procurement, becomes Apple's fourth C-level executive alongside CEO Tim Cook, Chief Financial Officer Luca Maestri and Chief Design Officer Jony Ive. As vice president of operations since 2004, his responsibilities included overseeing Apple's supply chain, service and support, and the company's social responsibility initiatives protecting its employees worldwide. He also continues to supervise development of the Apple Watch and ResearchKit. Cook called Williams "hands-down the best operations executive I’ve ever worked with."“We are fortunate to have incredible depth and breadth of talent across Apple’s executive team. As we come to the end of the year, we’re recognizing the contributions already being made by two key executives,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “Jeff is hands-down the best operations executive I’ve ever worked with, and Johny’s team delivers world-class silicon designs which enable new innovations in our products year after year.”Apple's COO position had been vacant since Cook was named CEO in August 2011. Schiller's expanded role will be focused on strategies to extend Apple's ecosystem across iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple Watch and Apple TV, alongside his traditional marketing responsibilities. App Store leadership previously belonged to Apple services chief Eddy Cue, who continues to oversee the

Phil Schiller Discusses Retina MacBook, Apple's 'Intense Collaboration'

Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller recently met with Mashable editor-at-large Lance Ulanoff for a rare interview, discussing topics ranging from the new 12-inch MacBook to Apple's "intense collaboration" that makes such products possible. Schiller emphasized how Apple's process from product conception to production has greatly changed over the past few decades, as a result of "intense collaboration" between industrial design and engineering teams within the company."From the beginning, the Mac has been about Apple taking responsibility for the whole thing: hardware, software, how applications can work and, increasingly, Internet services. But that means something different today than it did 20 years ago," Schiller said. "Today, those teams are not only integrated and designing something together, they’re actually thinking of features that could only exist because of that integration and solving problems that could only be solved because of that unique advantage."The interview provides a closer look at the new 12-inch MacBook, ranging from its ultra-small logic board to "speaktenna" combined speaker and antenna design, as an example of what's possible because of Apple's collaboration. Some like to call it the "Speaktenna." The black strip along the back edge of the MacBook speakers is a never-before-tried combination of speakers and antennas for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. […] In the case of the speaktenna, Apple engineers did everything in their power to fit the maximum amount of technology possible into the tiny anodized aluminum chassis. This included creating

Phil Schiller Talks 16 GB iPhones and Thinness vs Battery Life Tradeoffs

A day after the WWDC keynote address, Apple SVP of Marketing Phil Schiller joined Daring Fireball's John Gruber on Gruber's podcast, The Talk Show. The episode has not yet been posted, but The Verge was on hand to document the interview. Schiller addressed concerns about 16 GB iPhones, the decision between thin devices and battery life and the single USB port on the MacBook. Gruber suggested to Schiller that the Cupertino company's iOS devices should come with larger storage capacities on the low end, as the 16 GB of storage provided in the base iPhone 6 or 6 Plus is harder to live with with the current size of apps. Schiller countered that services like iCloud could make up the difference. "The belief is more and more as we use iCloud services for documents and our photos and videos and music," he said, "that perhaps the most price-conscious customers are able to live in an environment where they don't need gobs of local storage because these services are lightening the load."Schiller also said that using 16 GB storage for lower-end models allows Apple to save money for use on higher-end components in other parts of the device, like the camera. When asked about the relationship between the thickness of a phone and battery life, and whether maintaining the thickness of its devices could lead to more power-efficient internals and bigger batteries, Schiller said that Apple has the right balance with its devices. He points out that a device with a larger battery and thickness becomes heavier and takes longer to charge. Schiller notes that Apple tries to figure out the

Apple Watch Goes on Display in Milan, Phil Schiller and Marc Newson on Hand

After being announced to appear at Milan's Salone Del Mobile Design Fair earlier in the week, today the Apple Watch was displayed for the first time to the public, outside of a retail store or pop up shop, at the design fair (via Macitynet) [Google Translate]. The Apple Watch on display in the Carlo e Camilla restaurant On display at the Carlo e Camilla restaurant in Segheria, the Watch is displayed in long rows of glass-topped tables, identical to its presentation in Apple's own retail locations. The fair is even allowing customers to experience the same try-on appointments happening in retail stores since pre-orders began one week ago. The entrance to the Apple Watch showcase at the fair Interestingly, as the Watch is displayed at the Carlo e Camilla in Italy, pre-orders for the wearable aren't available to Italian customers due to Italy not being included in the first wave of launch countries for the Watch. There to experience the event is senior vice president of worldwide marketing at Apple, Phil Schiller, and Marc Newson, who works part time at Apple as a designer alongside Jony Ive. Phil Schiller at the event in Milan Although Apple has yet to confirm pre-order numbers for the Watch, analyst Ming-Chi Kuo believes the device could have sold more than 2.3 million units during the initial pre-order wave. While the exact number remains a mystery, stock of the Apple watch definitely remains constrained as pre-orders for all devices slipped to a 4-6 week dispatch date, and beyond, only 6 hours after going

Apple CEO Tim Cook, Phil Schiller Take On 'Ice Bucket Challenge' to Promote Awareness for ALS

Apple CEO Tim Cook today took the "Ice Bucket Challenge," which is designed to raise awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS, also commonly known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. The challenge asks people to pour buckets of ice water over their heads (documented on film and shared on social media sites) and then tag three friends to do the same. Friends unwilling to complete the challenge are asked to donate money towards ALS, but as noted by The Verge, many participants have chosen to participate and donate money to the cause. According to Instagram and Twitter photos, Tim Cook had a bucket of ice water dumped on him at Apple's Cupertino campus this afternoon during the company's bi-weekly beer bash while Vanilla Ice's Ice Ice Baby played in the background. Cook was first challenged yesterday by Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller, who completed the challenge himself. Image courtesy of Instagram user world_of_possibilities Schiller, who dumped a bucket of ice water over his own head at a beach in Half Moon Bay, also challenged actor Chris O'Donnell and his wife Kim. Cook has gone on to challenge Apple board member Bob Iger, musician Michael Franti, and Beats co-founder Dr. Dre. Phil Schiller takes the challenge Many notable celebrities and tech industry leaders have completed the ice bucket challenge in recent weeks, including Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. As of August 12, the challenge has raised more than $4 million in donations. Update: Apple has posted a full video of Cook and Franti taking the challenge.

Emails Show Phil Schiller's Displeasure with Ad Agency's Efforts for Apple in Early 2013

Multiple insider details on Apple and its business practices are surfacing during the company's second patent trial with Samsung, including a series of tense emails between Apple's head of marketing Phil Schiller and Apple's longtime ad agency, TBWA\Media Arts Lab (via BusinessInsider). Following the January 2013 release of an article from The Wall Street Journal entitled, "Has Apple Lost Its Cool to Samsung?" Schiller emailed Media Arts Lab and told them "We have a lot of work to do to turn this around…." In the article, The Wall Street Journal lauds Samsung's aggressive marketing campaign for the Galaxy S3, which had the clever tagline "The next big thing is already here." Samsung has argued that the campaign was a tipping point for the company and that it infuriated Apple executives as the advertising was coming at a time when Apple's own advertising was in a slump. Following Schiller's email about the WSJ article, the ad agency wrote back a lengthy email outlining a plan to put the iPhone back in the spotlight, unfortunately comparing Apple in 2013 to Apple in 1997, when the company was on the brink of going out of business. The email went on to suggest that the agency be given more freedom to experiment with ideas and that Apple needs to consider specific questions, such as company behavior, sales approaches, and product roadmaps. Schiller was "shocked" by the email he received from Media Arts Lab, both at the reference to 1997 and the idea that the team should be given free rein to create ideas that had not been pitched in Marketing and

Second Apple-Samsung Patent Trial Begins with Focus on Apple's 'Holy War', Advertising Envy, and Phil Schiller

Samsung and Apple's second patent trial started earlier this week with jury selection and opening arguments by both Apple and Samsung. Phil Schiller also took the stand as Apple's first witness in the trial, which started in earnest on Tuesday. Among the volume of internal documents provided in the case, The Wall Street Journal highlights emails from Apple founder Steve Jobs that reveal his commitment to beating Android, calling the competition a "Holy War" with Google. Jobs outlined this "battle" in an October 2010 email to 100 employees prior to the company's annual retreat. Jobs said in the email that "Apple is in danger of hanging on to old paradigm for too long (innovator's dilemma)" and notes that "Google and Microsoft are further along on the technology, but haven't quite figured it out yet." This characterization is favorable to Samsung as the company attempts to involve Google and Android in the patent infringement case. As part of its opening statement in the case, Samsung outlined its plans to share internal Apple documents that suggest Apple was taken aback by Samsung's edgy marketing campaign that characterized the company's Galaxy devices as "the next big thing." (via The Verge) "We will show you internal Apple documents, documents that haven't been made public before, and showed how Apple was really concerned about competition from Android, and in particular Samsung," John Quinn of law firm Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, which is representing Samsung in the trial, told an eight-person jury. "This new, edgy marketing strategy ... it drove

Apple Marketing Chief Phil Schiller to Testify Again in Upcoming Apple vs. Samsung Case

Apple's Chief of Worldwide Marketing, Phil Schiller, will be among the witnesses that both Apple and Samsung lawyers plan to call to the stand when the two companies return to court in March, reports PCWorld. The second trial will cover newer products that were not able to be included in the first jury trial. Phil Schiller was first called as a witness during the initial patent dispute between Samsung and Apple in 2012, and again in a damages retrial that took place in November of 2013. Schiller told the jury Samsung made it "much harder" for Apple to market and sell its devices. Samsung made it "harder for us to get new customers and bring them into our ecosystem," he said. In the second trial, Schiller will be asked to testify on several different aspects of the iPhone, iPad, and iPod, including design, development, and marketing."Mr. Schiller will be called to testify regarding design, development, promotion, marketing, advertising, consumer demand for, and sales of the iPhone, iPad, iPod, and other Apple products, including the features accused of infringing the Samsung feature patents, the smartphone and tablet markets, the Apple brand and Apple's marketing and advertising efforts," Samsung said in a filing Thursday with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.Samsung also plans to call Hiroshi Lockheimer, VP of engineering at Google, and Todd Pendleton, Samsung's marketing chief for its U.S. telecoms division. As for Apple, along with Schiller, the company expects to call Tony Blevins, VP of procurement; Gregory Christie, VP of human

Phil Schiller Tweets Link to Another Security Report Criticizing Android

Last year, Apple executive Phil Schiller tweeted a link to a research report that noted significant growth in mobile malware, particularly on Android. The report found that Android accounted for 79 percent of mobile threats, with just 0.7 percent attacking iOS.Today, Schiller followed up, tweeting a link to Cisco's 2014 Annual Security Report. The report, which came out late last week, notes that while overall vulnerabilities are highest since tracking began in 2000, 99 percent of all mobile malware targeted Android devices -- leaving iOS devices relatively unscathed thanks to Apple's controlling mobile ecosystem.The report does note that many mobile users encounter phishing or other social engineering websites, something that Apple's security protocols won't necessarily protect users from.Not all mobile malware is designed to target specific devices, however. Many encounters involve phishing, likejacking, or other social engineering ruses, or forcible redirects to websites other than expected. An analysis of user agents by Cisco TRAC/SIO reveals that Android users, at 71 percent, have the highest encounter rates with all forms of web-delivered malware, followed by Apple iPhone users with 14 percent of all web malware encounters. Cisco 2014 Security Report http://t.co/rd6M6yUXnU— Philip Schiller (@pschiller) January 21, 2014 Other than that specific mention of social engineering -- and that spam messages mention Apple Gift Cards -- the Cisco report does not mention Apple or the Mac or iOS at all. The tweet is likely part of a larger push by Apple to share more

Apple Marketing Chief Phil Schiller Appears On the Witness Stand in Apple/Samsung Damages Trial

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing, took the stand in the damages retrial between Apple and Samsung earlier today, testifying as the two companies argue over how much Samsung should pay Apple after the latter company won its patent lawsuit last year.Apple is asking for $379 million in damages, while Samsung believes it should only need to pay $52 million.Last year, Samsung was ordered to pay Apple a total of $1.05 billion after a jury found the South Korean company guilty of willfully violating multiple Apple patents. Back in March, Judge Lucy Koh struck $450 million from the $1 billion awarded to Samsung after deciding the jury may have miscalculated the damages due to a misunderstanding of patent issues. According to CNET, Schiller told the jury that Samsung made it "much harder" for Apple to market and sell its devices, and that Samsung's behavior has made it "harder for us to get new customers and bring them into our ecosystem."He added that Apple's marketing strategy revolves around "the product as the hero," highlighting features and capabilities that differentiate its devices from all others on the market. But Samsung's devices caused consumers to "question our design skills in a way they never used to," Schiller said.He also echoed comments from the trial last year, saying he was shocked when he saw Samsung's Galaxy phones."It looked exactly like the iPhone, so much so people might confuse it," Schiller said.After Schiller's testimony and cross-examination, Apple rested its case and Samsung took over after a lunch break.

Phil Schiller, Scott Forstall May Testify in Apple v. Samsung Damages Retrial

Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing Phil Schiller and former senior vice president of iOS software Scott Forstall may testify in the upcoming partial damages retrial between Apple and Samsung, reports PCWorld. Forstall has been largely out of the public eye since being ousted from Apple in late 2012. Set for November 12, the trial follows judge Lucy Koh's March ruling that struck $450 million from the $1 billion in damages awarded to Apple in August 2012. According to Koh, the jury may have miscalculated the original damages due to a misunderstanding of patent issues, resulting in a lump sum award that did not distinguish between patent violations. With a lump sum award, the court was unable to determine which part of the damages were applicable to each infringing patent. Ahead of the retrial, both Apple and Samsung have filed a joint statement that includes a list of potential witnesses, and on Apple's side, both Forstall and Schiller are listed.Apple's list includes Phil Schiller, the company's senior vice president of worldwide product marketing, and Scott Forstall, the former senior vice president of iOS software. Forstall's departure was announced last October following the widely criticized launch of Apple Maps, which some observers said may have led to his firing. Both Schiller and Forstall also testified in the original trial. Also on the Apple witness list is Susan Kare, who designed some of the icons for Apple's original Macintosh in the 1980s.The new trial could result in an award that favors either Apple or Samsung, depending on

Samsung Again Caught Inflating Benchmarking Scores, Phil Schiller Calls 'Shenanigans'

Like it did with its Galaxy S 4 smartphone, Samsung has once again been caught artificially increasing CPU speeds on its Galaxy Note 3 phone when benchmark apps are running, reports Ars Technica.Samsung uses special code inside its operating system to identify benchmarking apps by name to boost CPU clock speeds and prevent CPU cores from entering low-power modes. As a result, Ars discovered, Galaxy Note 3 benchmarks report CPU performance roughly 20 percent faster than most apps will experience on the device.The difference is remarkable. In Geekbench's multicore test, the Note 3's benchmark mode gives the device a 20 percent boost over its "natural" score. With the benchmark boosting logic stripped away, the Note 3 drops down to LG G2 levels, which is where we initially expected the score to be given the identical SoCs. This big of a boost means that the Note 3 is not just messing with the CPU idle levels; significantly more oomph is unlocked when the device runs a benchmark.Apple executive Phil Schiller -- senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing and the most prolific tweeter amongst Apple's senior staff -- linked to the Ars article in a tweet, saying only

Apple Senior Vice Presidents Phil Schiller and Dan Riccio Sell Stock Worth Over $20 Million

Apple senior vice presidents Phil Schiller and Dan Riccio recently exercised and sold more than 40,000 combined common stock shares worth over $20 million, according to documents filed today with the SEC. Schiller sold 37,172 shares of common stock at a price of $500 for a total haul of $18.6 million. Riccio sold a total of 3,754 shares of common stock over the course of 11 trades with prices ranging from $498.75 to $502.40 for a total of around $1.9 million. Last November Schiller was one of the Apple executives that was awarded 150,000 RSUs as an incentive to remain employed at Apple. Half of those shares vested on June 21, 2013 while the other half will vest on March 21, 2016. In addition to those 75,000 shares vesting in 2016, Schiller has thousands of shares of stock remaining. The moves to sell come two weeks after Apple directors Bill Campbell and Millard Drexler sold their stock options, three weeks after CFO Peter Oppenheimer sold his stock and almost two months after Apple SVPs Jeff Williams and Bruce Sewell cashed in on their

Phil Schiller Goes on Offensive Against Android and Samsung

Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller went on the offensive against Android in a unusually forthright interview with The Wall Street Journal.Mr. Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of world-wide marketing, also said that Android users are often running old operating systems and that the fragmentation in the Android world was "plain and simple."He added that "Android is often given a free replacement for a feature phone and the experience isn't as good as an iPhone."In addition to the above comments, Schiller said that Android devices and the operating system "don't work seamlessly together" because they come from different vendors, unlike Apple which makes both the software and hardware in its devices.Samsung is expected to announce an update to its flagship Galaxy S smartphone line

Phil Schiller Tweets Link to Mobile Malware Report That Slams Android

Phil Schiller, Apple's Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, doesn't post to his Twitter account very often. Mostly he has written innocuous messages wishing followers "Happy Christmas" or cheering on the world champion San Francisco Giants. Today, Phil tweeted a link to a 'Mobile Threat Report' from research company F-Secure. Most of the report highlights security and malware vulnerabilities in the Android operating system, while mentioning only a couple of iOS issues. He warns followers to "be safe out there". Be safe out there: http://t.co/40UbrWtE6R— Philip Schiller (@pschiller) March 7, 2013 Among other things, the report [PDF] shows the growth in mobile threats, particularly on the Android operating system. Android accounted for 79 percent of the 301 mobile threats in 2012, while just 0.7 percent of threats attacked iOS. The tweet is a bit out of character for Apple, which usually prefers a quiet public face on issues like this. This could be part of a push by Apple Public Relations to share more favorable third-party reports about the company in an effort to drive the conversation in a favorable

Reuters Pulls Story on Phil Schiller's iPhone Comments Following 'Substantial Changes' to Source Article [Updated]

Yesterday, a report from the Shanghai Evening News including comments made by Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller about Apple's refusal to build "cheap" devices was widely re-reported throughout both the Apple-focused rumor scene and in mainstream media. Schiller's comments were viewed by some as a direct rebuttal to recent rumors from The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg that Apple is working on a less expensive iPhone for launch as soon as later this year, although he actually appeared to simply be noting that any product Apple releases would not sacrifice quality in order to grab market share at lower price points. Reuters has now issued a brief statement retracting its re-reporting of the Shanghai Evening News piece, citing "substantial changes" to the source article. Reuters will not be publishing an amended version of its story. It is unclear exactly what changes Reuters is referring to, as the online version [Google translation] of the Shanghai Evening News piece appears to be essentially the same as when it was first covered by English-language media. Still, the retraction by Reuters casts significant uncertainty on the original report and raises questions about whether Schiller's comments were mistranslated or misinterpreted. Update 12:30 PM: Reuters has now published an explanation for its retraction, citing the changes made to the original Shanghai Evening News article.[I]n a new version of the story published after the original, the Shanghai Evening News removed all references to cheaper smartphones, except for a mention of a "cheaper, low-end

Phil Schiller Says Apple Wouldn't Sacrifice Quality for Market Share in a Cheaper iPhone

Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller is accompanying CEO Tim Cook on his trip to China, and the Shanghai Evening News has published an interview [Google translation] with Schiller in which he addresses recent rumors of a cheaper iPhone. The report was first brought to our attention by Macerkopf.de, but The Next Web has since obtained a better translation and confirmed with Apple that the report did indeed stem from an official interview with Schiller.Interviewer Huang Yinlong spoke to Schiller about Apple’s products in China who said that “every product that Apple creates, we consider using only the best technology available. This includes the production pipeline, the Retina display, the unibody design, to provide the best product to the market.” “At first, non-smartphones were popular in the Chinese market, now cheap smartphones are more popular and non-smartphones are out,” Schiller added later. “Despite the popularity of cheap smartphones, this will never be the future of Apple’s products. In fact, although Apple’s market share of smartphones is just about 20%, we own the 75% of the profit.” Schiller's comments of course do not specifically rule out the possibility of Apple launching a lower-cost iPhone, but he does make clear that Apple will not sacrifice quality in order to garner a greater unit share of the market. The philosophy should not be a surprise to anyone familiar with Apple, but it does provide reassurance that Apple will fill a very specific niche if it does pursue a lower-cost iPhone, opting to pursue its own course rather than being letting

Phil Schiller Claims Customers Aren't Asking for Built-In Blu-Ray Anymore

Apple customers are no longer asking for Blu-ray drives in their Macs these days, according to Apple marketing head Phil Schiller. This is perhaps unsurprising given Apple's trend toward removing optical drives from its notebook and now desktop lines, but may regardless cause some consternation among Blu-ray fans.A MacRumors post from June 2010 in which Steve Jobs told a reader that it appeared Blu-ray would be beaten by downloadable formats garnered more comments for a news post than any other in our history, and we still hear from tipsters asking when Apple will finally include a Blu-ray player in its Macs.According to an interview Phil Schiller did with Time's Harry McCracken, native Blu-ray support will likely never come to the Mac.Schiller pointed out that one major application for optical drives, software distribution, has gone largely digital. As for video, he said that "Blu-ray has come with issues unrelated to the actual quality of the movie that make [it] a complex and not-great technology…So for a whole plethora of reasons, it makes a lot of sense to get rid of optical discs in desktops and notebooks."His preferred Blu-ray alternative? iTunes, of course, which lets you buy a movie and then watch it on all your Apple devices.Once upon a time, people assumed that Macs’ lack of Blu-ray was a delay, not a permanent decision to fast-forward past it. I told Schiller that I imagined folks don’t ask about it much these days. "Correct," he said.External Blu-ray drives are available currently via USB 2/3 and eventually via Thunderbolt but, given the overwhelming

'Which?' Tests Phil Schiller's iPad Mini Weight Comparison Claims

'Which?', a UK-based consumer advocacy organization, has performed some research and determined that Apple's claims about the lightness of the iPad Mini appear to be accurate. The device is roughly the same weight as some heavier notepads, and is lighter than a can of Coke or a loaf of bread: So there it is; the iPad mini isn’t quite as light as a pad of paper – at least our non-spiraled softback pad. There are certainly pads of paper that are heavier so Phil Schiller’s claim that it’s as light as a pad of paper is about right. It’ll certainly feel lighter than a can of coke in your hands, making it easier to hold in a single hand while you browse the web for long periods or read ebooks on the move. While lighter than the Kindle Fire (395g) and the Google Nexus (334g), the difference is probably too insubstantial to influence your buying choice.