data center


'data center' Articles

Apple Plans Second Data Center for iCloud Services in China

Apple is planning to build a second data center in China, with an operation date set for 2020 and location in Ulanqab City, according to a report today by Xinhua Net (via Reuters). Located in north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, the second center is said to provide various iCloud services for users on the Chinese mainland. Plans are for the center to run on 100 percent renewable energy sources, similar to other data centers built by Apple. Apple Inc., the United States tech giant, will build a data center in Ulanqab City in north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, after its first data center in southwestern Guizhou Province, the local government has announced. The Ulanqab City data center will be Apple's second in China, following an announcement last summer for its first China-based data center located in the southern province of Guizhou. The first center was set up in partnership with data management firm Guizhou-Cloud Big Data Industry and in accordance with the country's new cybersecurity laws. At the time, Reuters reported that Apple was the first foreign tech firm to announce amendments to its data storage arrangements in China to comply with a new cybersecurity law that was implemented in June, requiring foreign firms to store data within the country. While concerns about surveillance and data security were brought up, Apple assured reporters it had strong privacy and security protections in place, stating that "No backdoors will be created into any of our systems." Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this

Apple Celebrates Groundbreaking of New Reno Warehouse With Visit From Apple CEO Tim Cook

Apple today started construction on a new warehouse in downtown Reno, Nevada, with the site visited this afternoon by Apple CEO Tim Cook, Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval, and Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve, reports the Reno Gazette-Journal. In a speech given at the groundbreaking of the warehouse, which is located near the company's Reno data center, Cook said the data center is a key component in the ecosystem that provides billions of iMessages, photos, and FaceTime calls to customers around the world each day. Breaking ground in Reno today with @GovSandoval & @MayorSchieve as part of our data center expansion plan, one of many Apple initiatives which will contribute $350 billion to the U.S. economy and create 20,000 new jobs over the next 5 years. pic.twitter.com/g40dlHsxuC— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) January 17, 2018 "We've invested $1.6 billion in the region today and over the course of the next six years, we intend to invest an additional $1 billion," said Cook."Reno plays an incredibly important role in the products and services that we provide our customers worldwide. Without the data center here, none of this would be possible."Apple's presence in Reno kicked off in 2012 with the construction of its data center. As part of that deal Apple was required to build a facility in the downtown Reno tourism improvement district, hence the warehouse. Apple plans to use the upcoming Reno, Nevada warehouse to move equipment to the data center, which Apple allowed the Reno Gazette-Journal to tour today following Cook's speech. Image via the Reno Gazette-Journal The site

Apple's Irish Data Center Faces New Challenge as Residents Plan to Fight Back Against Court Approval [Updated]

Apple has been trying to get its $1 billion data center in County Galway, Ireland built for well over two years now, and last week the company finally won approval for construction by the Irish High Court. While it was expected that Apple would now move forward and begin planning for construction, two local residents have brought up a new legal challenge for the company. As reported by The Galway Advertiser (via Business Insider), two Athenry residents have requested a certificate to appeal the court ruling made last week that granted Apple permission for the project. The case is said to be due back to the court on Wednesday, October 25. Previously, the same individuals challenged Apple's data center by citing multiple environmental concerns, but their challenge was rejected. Locals marching in support for Apple's data center last November (via Apple for Athenry) Environmental protection issues have been the source of the objector's arguments for the last few years, originally arguing that Apple's data center could have negative effects on local animal populations, and could lead to potential flooding concerns on a neighboring golf course. Then, the data center's proximity to a local nuclear power plant was used to bring up new objections to the site's construction, despite the plant having been shut down for years. Many locals still support Apple's data center in the area, with the leader of the Apple for Athenry Facebook group telling Business Insider that "the collective hearts of Athenry sank" when the new legal challenge was brought up this week. Apple

Apple Wins Approval for $1 Billion Data Center in Ireland

Apple has won approval to build a $1 billion data center in the west of Ireland, successfully fending off an environmental legal challenge brought by local residents (via Reuters). Ireland's High Court on Thursday ruled that the proposed data center in Galway county, planned by Apple since February 2015, could proceed despite locals' various environmental concerns for the area if Apple successfully built the facility. The residents against Apple attempted to halt construction last November by claiming that the permission it was granted by independent planning body An Bord Pleanála was invalid. They alleged that An Bord Pleanála hadn't performed a proper environmental impact assessment of the proposed data center at Derrydonnell. Apple successfully asked the High Court to fast-track the case, and today's approval will likely bring the legal proceedings to an end. When Apple announced the Irish data center in 2015, it also announced one for Denmark. That center is expected to begin operations later this year. Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Apple Confirms Plans to Build Data Center in Iowa, Contribute Up to $100M to Community Projects

Apple today announced plans to build a 400,000-square-foot data center in Waukee, Iowa, which will provide backend infrastructure for the App Store, Siri, Apple Music, iMessage, and other Apple services in North America. Apple is investing $1.3 billion into the facility, which it says will create over 550 construction and operations jobs in the Des Moines area."Apple is responsible for 2 million jobs in all 50 states and we're proud today's investment will add to the more than 10,000 jobs we already support across Iowa, providing even more economic opportunity for the community," said Tim Cook, Apple's CEO.Apple also said it will contribute up to $100 million to a newly created Public Improvement Fund dedicated to community development and infrastructure around Waukee. The fund, to be established and managed by the City of Waukee, will support the development of community projects like parks, libraries and recreational spaces, as well as infrastructure needs."We're honored Apple is choosing Iowa for the site of its most technologically advanced data center to date," said Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds. "Apple's commitment to innovation and renewable energy leadership mirrors our own. This investment in our state is vital as we continue to develop as a technology hub and grow our workforce."As part of its pledge to power all of its global operations with 100 percent renewable energy, Apple said the data center will run entirely on renewable energy from day one. Apple noted it will be working with local partners to invest in renewable energy projects from wind and other

Apple to Build New Data Center in Iowa [Updated]

Apple is planning to build a new data center in Waukee, Iowa, according to a meeting agenda published by the Iowa Economic Development Authority Board and shared by The Des Moines Register. At a meeting that will take place Thursday morning, the board plans to review Apple's application for investment in the city and will "consider an undisclosed amount of incentives" to encourage Apple to build the data center. An Apple data center in Reno, via the Reno-Gazette Journal While the agenda simply suggests Apple is planning some kind of project in Waukee, sources that spoke to The Des Moines Register have said Apple will build a data center, joining Microsoft, Facebook, and Google, companies that also have data centers in the area. Apple currently has data centers located around the world. In the United States, Apple operates data centers in Reno, Nevada; Prineville, Oregon; Maiden, North Carolina; Newark, California; and Mesa, Arizona. Update: Iowa's Economic Development Authority approved a deal on Thursday that will give Apple $208 million in state and local tax breaks to construct two data centers near Des Moines. The new data centers will create approximately 50 jobs, and Apple will buy 2,000 acres of land for the project, allowing for future

Some Supporters of Apple's Irish Data Center Have 'Totally Lost Hope' as Final Verdict Again Delayed

One year ago, Apple began a staunch defense of its proposed data center in Galway County, Ireland, as a group of locals attempted to derail construction by reciting various environmental concerns for the area if Apple successfully built the facility. The delayed data center was supposed to be met with a decision this week, but now The Irish Times is reporting that a final verdict has been delayed yet again, with the Court Services confirming this week that the case will not be heard until October 12. While there are some residents opposing the data center, there remains a large group fighting with Apple to help bring jobs to the area. Apple supporters marching last November, via Athenry For Apple Facebook page According to local resident Paul Keane, who spoke with Business Insider, some of those on Apple's side have "totally lost hope." But Local resident Paul Keane, who is a member of the Athenry for Apple Facebook group, said: "Some have totally lost hope and more are now more fearful of a complete loss of confidence in investment for the west and long term damage to the country simply because we couldn't get our act together." The residents against Apple attempted to halt construction last November by claiming that the permission it was granted by independent planning body An Bord Pleanála was invalid. They alleged that An Bord Pleanála didn't perform a proper environmental impact assessment of the proposed data center at Derrydonnell, located on the outskirts of Athenry, where the residents live. Apple successfully asked the High Court to fast-track the case,

Apple to Build Second Data Center in Denmark

Apple is set to spend $921 million on a second data center in Denmark run entirely on renewable energy. The news was relayed by the Danish government's Ministry of Climate Energy and confirmed in a statement to Reuters by Apple's Nordic director Erik Stannow. "We're thrilled to be expanding our data center operations in Denmark, and investing in new sources of clean power," Erik Stannow, Nordic manager for Apple, told Reuters in an email. "The planned facility in Aabenraa, like all of our data centers, will run on 100 percent renewable energy from day one, thanks to new clean energy sources we're adding," he said.Apple said the new data center would begin operations in the second quarter of 2019 and would power its online services, including the likes of iMessage, Siri, Maps, and the App Store. The data center is located in Aabenraa near the German border, which is a couple of hundred miles south of the data center the company has built just outside of Viborg, which is due to start operations later this year. Apple said a planned data center in Athenry, Ireland, announced in 2015, had yet to begin construction and is awaiting judicial review. Apple faced multiple objections from local groups because of the planned facility's possibly harmful effects on the nearby wilderness. Originally it aimed to have the Irish data center up and running by early 2017. (Thanks, Daniel!)

Apple to Use Repurposed Mesa, Arizona Factory to Manufacture Data Center Cabinets

Apple wants to use GT Advanced's former sapphire plant to produce hardware that will be used within its U.S. data centers, according to a notification published by the Federal Register and shared by Business Insider. Apple is seeking approval from the Foreign-Trade Zones Board to create "finished products and foreign status materials/components" in the factory. Specifically, Apple wants to create "finished server assembly cabinets" and needs permission to use materials sourced from abroad. Image via AZCentral According to the filing, the data center cabinets will be used for "other global data centers." A person with knowledge of Apple's data centers spoke to Business Insider and said Apple's data center server production will be consolidated in Mesa, Arizona. Servers for Apple's Oregon and North Carolina data centers are currently built and tested on-site, and the same likely goes for other global data center locations. With the Mesa factory, Apple will build and configure all U.S. servers in Arizona and ship them to Oregon and North Carolina. Apple originally purchased the Mesa, Arizona factory for sapphire manufacturer GT Advanced, but after the sapphire-making company failed to produce sapphire up to Apple's standards and went bankrupt, Apple was left with an empty facility. Apple announced plans to repurpose the sapphire plant in 2014, and is said to be investing $2 billion to turn it into a "global command center" for Apple's data network. At 1.3 million square feet, the facility is large enough to serve as both a data center and a manufacturing plant

Apple's Oft-Delayed Irish Data Center Now on Fast Track to Begin Construction Within Six Months

Last week, a new legal challenge arose for Apple's massive data center in Galway County, Ireland at the hands of three individuals in the nearby town of Athenry, who filed official complaints against the data center with the Galway County Council, local planning body An Bord Pleanála, and even the High Court. Today, the Irish High Court has ruled in Apple's favor and pledged to fast-track building approval of the data center following months of roadblocks and red tape (via Business Insider). Specifically, the court has decided to put the dispute between Apple and the three individuals on the "commercial list," a dedicated section of the court which deals with cases that have more than €1 million at stake. Because of this, the case "must be concluded within six months," and Apple will be able to eventually begin construction of the data center, which is intended to power services like the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay and iCloud. Locals march in support of Apple's data center Local politician Ciaran Cannon wrote on the Athenry for Apple Facebook group: "Very good news from the High Court just now. The Fitzpatrick/Daly proceedings have been admitted to the Commercial Court list. This means that the hearing must be concluded within 6 months, rather than the 18 months for a normal Judicial Review case. Their case will now be be heard on the 21st of March. The application to admit the third objector, McDonagh, to the same list will be heard next Monday." Today's decision followed a local march in Athenry yesterday organized by citizens in the town and its surrounding

Apple's Irish Data Center Facing New Legal Challenges as Locals Plan March in Support

It's been three months since Apple finally gained approval to build its massive data center just outside of Athenry in Galway County, Ireland, and now "a small handful of locals" have been reported as working to derail Apple's data center project since the company got approval in August. The residents have filed complaints with Galway County Council, local planning body An Bord Pleanála, and most recently have taken it to High Court (via Business Insider). Apple is now trying to get the High Court to fast track the case brought upon by the three individuals in Athenry, mainly by putting the dispute on a "commercial list," a dedicated section of the court which deals with cases that have more than €1 million at stake. For the data center in Ireland alone (one of similar scale is going up in Denmark), Apple plans to spend €850 million. Not all of the locals are against Apple's attempts to build in the area, however, and are planning a march in support this weekend "to show Apple, and the whole world, that the vast majority of Athenry people support wholeheartedly Apple's desire to open a data centre near our town." In the Apple for Athenry March Facebook event, the supportive residents of the town mention a fear that if negative opinions continue to mount against Apple's appearance in the area, the opportunity for community growth could "slip through our fingers." "We want to show Apple, and the whole world, that the vast majority of Athenry people support wholeheartedly Apple's desire to open a data centre near our town PLEASE ATTEND THIS EVENT, AND MAKE

Apple's Second European Data Center Prepares for 2017 Opening in Foulum, Denmark

Earlier in the year, Apple announced that it would be spending $2 billion on two new data centers in Europe, with one located in Ireland and another in Denmark. New information has emerged today regarding the second data center in Denmark, which will be located in Foulum (via The Copenhagen Post). Foulum is a small town outside of Viborg -- a larger a city in central Jutland, Denmark -- where the agricultural research facilities of Aarhus University are located. This will be helpful for Apple, since the company also recently announced a partnership with the Aarhus University on a new biogas research and development project. The research will look into how to convert biogas into electricity through the use of fuel cells, and the help of various agricultural waste materials provided by local farmers. Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen said the new collaboration is “an excellent follow-on to Apple’s billion investment in the data centre”. “The new partnership is a good example that [ministry investment organization] Invest in Denmark’s targeted efforts to attract data centre investments to Denmark is producing excellent results. It also illustrates that data centre investors often wish to contribute to research into and the expansion of the renewable energy capacity in Denmark to the benefit of everyone,” Jensen said in a statement. At 6.3 billion kroner, the 166,000-square-meter data center is the "largest foreign capital investment in Danish history." Similar to the Irish data center, the one in Denmark will help power Apple's online services in Europe,

Apple Gets Approval for Irish Data Center Construction After Months of Objections

Following months of being repeatedly blocked by independent planning body An Bord Pleanála, Apple has finally been granted the go-ahead to build its massive data center in Galway County, Ireland (via Business Insider). The Irish planning board reversed course on its earlier oppositions to the data center, "despite opposition from a number of individuals and local businesses," giving Apple permission to build just one data hall. Each time an extension of the property is to be made, Apple will have to reapply for permission with the local planning body. The original objections to the facility -- which will specifically be located in Derrydonnell Forest -- cited a worry over the local wildlife and the potential for negative impact that Apple's data center could have on it, as well as flooding concerns in a neighboring golf course. In June, these issues continued anew with fresh worry that the data center's proximity to a nuclear power plant could be harmful, despite the plant having been shut down for years. The planning body said the data centre will provide the area with a significant economic boost, adding that they took into account how hard it is to find sites that are able to accommodate huge data centres that need to be connected to the national grid. With the new majority vote from An Bord Pleanála overpowering the last few protestors, Apple now can continue with its 10-15 year construction plan of a massive data center site for services like the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay and iCloud. After winning permission for this first building, Apple's ultimate

New Objections to Apple's Irish Data Center Focus on Proximity to Nuclear Power Plants

Apple continues to defend its proposed data center in Galway County, Ireland, during an oral hearing brought together from an appeal by independent planning body An Bord Pleanála. This time, those against the company's site in Derrydonnell Forest argued that it is planning to build in a location that's too close to a local nuclear power plant (via Business Insider). Oscar Gonzalez, who works in data center site selection at Apple, defended the company's west coast of Ireland location, stating that it meets Apple's goal of being at least 320km from the nearest nuclear facility. According to a few witnesses present at the oral hearing, however, the Derrydonnell Forest location was so desired by Apple that the company manufactured the arbitrary 320km rule of thumb to eliminate areas of Ireland that are specially designated for data center construction. "Brenda McGuane and Others" suggest that Apple adopted the 320km radius to eliminate more suitable plots of land in other parts of Ireland. They say: "the selection of sites greater than 320km from nuclear facilities is not a criteria adopted by Apple for its data centres in the US. The criteria has not been adopted by other international corporations." The fact that the likes of Google and Microsoft have built data centres near Dublin shows that other large tech companies are willing to put their server farms less than 320km away from UK nuclear sites. The nearest nuclear facility to the proposed site - called Wylfa Nuclear Power Station - is located in Wales and is approximately 280km away, but it's been closed down

Apple Defends 15-Year Development Plan for Irish Data Center Amidst Environmental Concerns

Over a year after announcing its plan to spend $2 billion on new data centers in Ireland and Denmark, Apple is now defending its decision for the former location amidst rising concern that its state-of-the-art facilities will have negative effects on local animal populations, and could lead to potential flooding concerns on a neighboring golf course (via Business Insider). Irish planning body An Bord Pleanála managed to temporarily halt construction of the Ireland-based data center thanks to these concerns, which were brought to it by a number of individuals and organizations. Its biggest question was asking why Apple chose the middle of Derrydonnell forest in Galway County, Ireland as its planned site for the server farm, given that there are other places in Ireland designated specifically for data center construction. Solar panels at Apple's data center in Maiden, North Carolina Apple's senior director of global data center services, Robert Sharpe, explained the vital nature of the European data centers as part of Apple's continued expansion and support for its various services like the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay and iCloud. Sharpe said that Apple must pursue this phased development (the Derrydonnell Forest center would be constructed over 10-15 years) to continue to accommodate for more smartphones, more services, and more users expecting quality experiences out of both. "Derrydonnell forest, the site of the proposed development, offers a combination of factors that make it uniquely attractive for a data centre," Sharpe said. "It is a large site,

Apple Planning to Build Second Data Center in Reno

Apple is planning to further expand at its Reno, Nevada data center site, reports the Reno Gazette-Journal, citing a recent permit Apple filed with Washoe County. Apple has requested permission to build a new data center adjacent to its exiting data center. Over the past several years, Apple has expanded at the site of its original data center several times to add on new buildings, but its most recent permit suggests it is seeking to build a second data center nearby under the codename "Project Huckleberry." Image via the Reno Gazette-Journal Project Huckleberry's plans call for several new data center clusters and a support building, similar to the current "Project Mills" data center on the site."It's a whole different set of buildings but it looks like it is going to be essentially the same design as Project Mills, only turned perpendicularly to the east," said Trevor Lloyd, senior planner for Washoe County Planning and Development's Community Services.Apple's existing data center on its Reno campus is operational, but still under development. When finished, it is expected to encompass 14 buildings and 412,000 square feet. Apple's second data center will be similar in size, with the site also eventually including an accompanying solar

Apple Planning Major Expansion of Oregon Data Center

Apple is planning a large-scale expansion of its Prineville, Oregon data center, according to The Oregonian. The report claims Apple is likely to expand upon its current 338,000-square-foot data center with a matching facility and massive solar array this year, after Oregon governor Kate Brown signed a tax bill last week that will exempt Apple and other tech companies from facing millions of dollars in additional property taxes. Apple's data center in Prineville, Oregon (Randy L. Rasmussen/The Oregonian) Apple is now planning to move forward with its data center plans, according to Judge Mike McCabe, Crook County's top administrator, although exact details surrounding the project are said to remain under negotiation. "They're planning on a major, major expansion," said McCabe. "They haven't shared it with us," he said, "and we haven't seen the plans." Apple began construction on the first phase of its Oregon data center in October

Apple Spending $2 Billion to Build Two New Data Centers in Europe

Apple announced on Monday that it will invest €1.7 billion to build and operate two new data centers in Europe. The state-of-the-art facilities will be located in County Galway, Ireland and the Central Jutland Region of Denmark, powering Apple's online services such as the App Store, iTunes Store, iMessage, Maps and Siri for European customers.“We are grateful for Apple’s continued success in Europe and proud that our investment supports communities across the continent,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “This significant new investment represents Apple’s biggest project in Europe to date. We’re thrilled to be expanding our operations, creating hundreds of local jobs and introducing some of our most advanced green building designs yet.”The data centers will be powered by 100% clean and renewable energy sources, with each having the lowest environmental impact yet for any Apple data center. Apple will also work with local partners to develop additional renewable energy projects derived from wind and other sources for future usage.“We believe that innovation is about leaving the world better than we found it, and that the time for tackling climate change is now,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environmental Initiatives. “We’re excited to spur green industry growth in Ireland and Denmark and develop energy systems that take advantage of their strong wind resources. Our commitment to environmental responsibility is good for the planet, good for our business and good for the European economy.”The 166,000-square-meter data centers are expected to be begin operations by

Apple to Build $2B 'Global Command Center' in Former GT Advanced Plant

Apple plans to take over the Mesa, Arizona factory where GT Advanced was formerly producing sapphire boules, transforming the facility into a massive $2 billion data center, reports CNBC. The data center will reportedly act as a "command center" for Apple's global data network. According to Arizona Governor Doug Ducey, the center will house 150 full-time Apple employees and its construction at the 1.3 million square foot facility will create 300 to 500 additional jobs. BIG NEWS: #Apple making $2 billion investment in our state. First #SB49, now this. Arizona is open for business! http://t.co/pPunvL7Wjf.— Doug Ducey (@dougducey) February 2, 2015 In a statement, Apple called the investment one of the largest it had ever made and pledged that the facility would run on 100 percent renewable energy like the company's other data centers."This multibillion-dollar project is one of the largest investments we've ever made, and when completed it will add over 600 engineering and construction jobs to the more than one million jobs Apple has already created in the U.S. Like all Apple data centers, it will be powered by 100 percent renewable energy, much of which will come from a new local solar farm," Apple said in a statement on the project.After GT Advanced filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the Mesa, Arizona plant, there were questions about what Apple would do with the facility. GT Advanced's closure caused a massive loss of jobs in Mesa, but Apple pledged to find a way to repurpose the location and preserve jobs in the city. Image courtesy of AZCentral