Apple ID

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'Apple ID' How Tos

How to Delete or Deactivate Your Apple ID Account and Data

Apple has launched a new Data and Privacy website that enables users to request a copy of all of the data associated with their Apple ID accounts that the company maintains on its servers. The page also provides options to delete or deactivate an Apple ID by following the step-by-step instructions outlined below. While any customer anywhere can delete an Apple ID account, Apple says the ability to deactivate an Apple ID account is limited to accounts with locations set in the European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland. Apple intends to roll out the deactivation option around the world "in the coming months." Keep in mind that deleting an Apple ID account and any associated data is a permanent, irreversible* action. After your account is deleted, Apple can't reopen or reactivate your account or restore any of your data, and you will no longer be able to access any of the content and services listed

How to Enable Two-Step Verification for Apple ID

Apple introduced an additional layer of security for iPhone, iPad and Mac users in 2013 by rolling out two-step verification for Apple ID accounts. Two-step verification prevents anyone but you from accessing your Apple ID account, even if they know the password, by requiring a four-digit verification code sent via SMS or Find My iPhone on trusted devices. When you enable two-step verification, you must register at least one trusted device capable of receiving SMS text messages. Once activated, two-step authentication is required when managing your Apple ID through My Apple ID, signing into iCloud, or making iTunes, iBooks or App Store purchases from a new device. Apple has also expanded two-step authentication to iMessage and FaceTime, requiring users to input an authentication code from a verified device on accounts that have two-factor verification enabled to prevent unauthorized entry attempts through both

'Apple ID' Articles

Apple Watch Can Display Apple ID Verification Codes Starting in watchOS 6

Starting in watchOS 6, the Apple Watch has become a trusted device for Apple ID authentication purposes. When you or someone else signs in to your Apple ID on a new device or browser, the Apple Watch will automatically alert you, complete with an approximate location of the person. If the sign-in attempt is allowed, a six-digit verification code will then appear to be entered on the new device or browser. Something I haven’t seen before watchOS 6: the Apple Watch can now receive and display Apple ID Verification Codes as a trusted device for 2-factor authentication. pic.twitter.com/Oin8AbYEDc— Jeremy Horwitz (@horwitz) June 10, 2019 This functionality has been available on iPhones and iPads since iOS 9, and on Macs since OS X El Capitan, for Apple ID accounts with two-factor authentication enabled. Now, users simply have one more option in the Apple

Apple Pay Now Accepted for iTunes, App Store, Apple Music, and iCloud Purchases in Some Countries

Apple Pay is now an accepted payment method for iTunes, App Store, and Apple Books purchases, as well as Apple Music and iCloud storage subscriptions, as reflected in a recently updated Apple support document. To link any credit or debit cards set up in the Wallet app with your Apple ID account, navigate to Settings > iTunes & App Store. Next, select your Apple ID email and then tap View Apple ID > Manage Payments > Add Payment Method. The cards should be listed under a new "Found in Wallet" section. This functionality is rolling out as a server-side change in the United States, Canada, Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Russia, Ukraine, and the United Arab Emirates, so it is not available for all users yet. In the United States, users can also link an Apple Pay Cash card to an Apple ID account. There are a handful of benefits to Apple Pay billing for Apple ID account-tied purchases, including the ability to conveniently add multiple credit or debit cards, the improved security of Apple Pay, and the ability to better manage Apple Music and iCloud storage subscriptions from the Wallet app. This functionality arrives ahead of the launch of the Apple Card credit card in the United States this summer. (Thanks, Dean Lubaki!)

Apple Offering 10% Bonus iTunes Credit When Adding Funds to Your Apple ID

Apple has begun offering users the chance to add 10 percent extra credit to their App Store and iTunes accounts this week, similar to past offers from the company. For this deal, you'll have to add money to your Apple ID account from a credit or debit card connected to your account. To add the funds on your iPhone, visit the App Store, tap your profile picture, and then tap "Add Funds to Apple ID." Here you can choose from $1.00 to $200.00 to add to your account in order to get the 10 percent bonus credit. This means that the most you can get out of the offer is $20 in free iTunes credit when adding $200 to your account. The promotion will last through Friday, May 10 and is available in the United States as well as other regions, including Japan. With the credit in your iTunes account, you can rent or purchase iTunes movies and TV shows, buy books in Apple Books, pay for your Apple Music or iCloud subscriptions, and much

Apple Offering 10% Bonus When Adding Funds to Your Account for App Store and iTunes Purchases

Apple today sent out emails letting App Store and iTunes users know about a new promotion that offers a 10 percent bonus when adding funds to an Apple ID account. When you add money directly to your Apple ID from a credit or debit card for making App Store, iTunes, and iCloud purchases, Apple is adding bonus credit. Apple says the offer is valid on amounts ranging from $1.00 to $200, so customers who add the maximum $200 in funds to their Apple IDs will receive a total of $220 with the bonus ($20 free). Funds can be added to your Apple ID account by opening up the Settings app, tapping on your account name, selecting the iTunes and App Store option, choosing your Apple ID, and then selecting "Add Funds to Apple ID." From there, you can see the promotional bonuses available and choose the amount of money you want to add to your account. You can also get to these options in the iTunes Store by tapping on your Apple ID or in the App Store by scrolling to the bottom (or tapping your profile picture) and selecting the Add Funds option. To use this feature, you will need to have a valid payment method added to your Apple ID account. The promotion will be available from March 10 through March 14 in the United States, and it is also available in other countries as well, such as Germany, where Apple is offering a 15 percent bonus. No bonus funds are available in the UK, Australia, or Canada, however.

Apple Expands 10% Bonus When Adding Funds to Apple ID to More Countries Through December 24

Apple has extended and expanded its 10 to 15 percent bonus offer when adding funds directly to an Apple ID account. The offer was initially available in the U.S. only and set to expire December 20, but the bonus is now available through December 24 in the U.S., Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, and the United Kingdom, according to Thrifter. The bonus can be applied once on up to $200 in Apple ID funds, which can be used towards purchases on the iTunes Store, Apple Books Store, App Store, a recurring iCloud storage subscription, and so forth. To add funds directly to an Apple ID, go to Settings > Your Name > iTunes & App Store and tap your Apple ID > View Apple ID. Sign in if necessary, tap "Add Funds to Apple ID," tap the amount that you want to add, and confirm your selection. There's also a shortcut available at the bottom of the App Store. Or, in iTunes on a Mac or PC, click on Account > View My Account… in the menu bar and then click on the Add Funds to Apple ID link. Adding funds requires a valid payment method on file and is particularly useful for prepaid credit

Apple Offering 10% Bonus When Adding Funds Directly to Apple ID

Apple is rolling out a new promotion that offers customers a 10 percent bonus when adding funds directly to their Apple ID account in the United States between December 17-20. The bonus applies once on up to $200 and was first highlighted by Japanese blog Mac Otakara. The funds can be used towards purchases on the iTunes Store and App Store, an iCloud storage subscription, and so forth. To add funds directly to an Apple ID, go to Settings > Your Name > iTunes & App Store and tap your Apple ID > View Apple ID. Sign in if necessary, tap "Add Funds to Apple ID," tap the amount that you want to add, and confirm your selection. There's also a shortcut available at the bottom of the App Store. Adding funds to an Apple ID requires having a valid payment method on file and is particularly useful for prepaid credit

Some Users Locked Out of Their Apple IDs, Forced to Reset Passwords

Apple appears to have locked a select group of users out of their Apple ID accounts over the past 20 hours or so, with no clear indication yet as to why the incident has occurred. According to reports on Reddit and Twitter, users are being kicked out of their Apple IDs for security reasons, and forced to reset their password to gain access to their account. Users report this happening without warning on iPhone, Apple TV, and other Apple devices, while they were using Apple Music, watching TV, etc. The original poster on Reddit confirmed that they have two factor authentication enabled and a unique iCloud password for their Apple ID not used anywhere else, and many users report similar settings. On Twitter, @AppleSupport is guiding users to the Support Communities web page that explains what to do if your Apple ID is locked and disabled. In nearly all instances across social media, users are reporting that they must reset their Apple ID password to be able to get back into their accounts. With no official word from Apple and no clear reason behind these forced password resets, it's unclear why some users were affected and what caused Apple to initiate the wave of resets in the first place. We've reached out to Apple for a comment, and will update this article if we hear

Apple Customers in the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand Can Download a Copy of Their Data Starting Today

Apple today is extending its full-featured Data and Privacy portal to the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Apple customers in those four countries will now have the option to download a copy of any data associated with their Apple ID account that Apple maintains, such as calendars, reminders, photos, and documents stored in iCloud, purchase histories, Game Center activity, and AppleCare support history. The portal has been available to customers in the European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland since May to comply with Europe's General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR. Apple said the service would be made available worldwide in the coming months, starting with today's expansion. In the meantime, Apple customers who live in a country or region that's not listed above can still contact Apple to request a copy of their data. Apple promises to fulfill all portal-based data requests within seven days, and emails customers to let them know it is preparing their data. Read our how-to for step-by-step instructions on requesting a copy of your data. Update: The data-download option doesn't appear to be available immediately and may take some time to roll out to all users

Apple Apologizes After Stolen Apple ID Credentials Aided in Phishing Attack in China

Apple has formally apologized to users in China over the hacking of some Chinese accounts in a series of phishing scams that hit the country last week. The successful phishing attacks used stolen Apple IDs to gain access to customer funds, leading to "a small number of...users' accounts" being accessed through these scams (via The Wall Street Journal). In a statement shared in China today, Apple said: "We are deeply apologetic about the inconvenience caused to our customers by these phishing scams." When news of the incident emerged last week, Chinese mobile payment companies Alipay and WeChat reported that hackers were able to take an unknown amount of money from accounts using stolen Apple IDs. Some users were said to have lost up to 2,000 yuan ($288) following the breach. According to Apple's new statement, these victims had not enabled two-factor authentication, making it easier for the hackers to gain access to their accounts. Apple didn't confirm how many users were affected in China, how much money was stolen in total, or how the hackers gained access to the Apple IDs in question. The company encouraged all users to enable two-factor authentication on their accounts to ensure further security protections are in place. China remains important to Apple's overseas expansion plans, but the company has faced numerous speed bumps in this regard over the years. In 2018, Apple moved Chinese iCloud data to state-owned China Telecom, which brought up user privacy concerns; faced an issue with an overabundance of illegal gambling apps on the Chinese iOS App

Apple Now Letting Apple IDs With Third-Party Email Addresses Be Updated to Apple Email Addresses

Apple today made a small change to the way Apple IDs work, and for the first time, Apple customers who have an Apple ID that uses a third-party email address can update that Apple ID to use an Apple @icloud.com, @me.com, or @mac.com email address. Prior to today, an Apple ID that used a third-party email address could be changed to another third-party email address, but there wasn't an option to use one of the Apple email accounts that are created when an Apple ID is made. The change was outlined by MacRumors reader Dillon, who sent an email to several executives earlier this month asking for the problem to be changed. Dillon was contacted by Apple Executive Relations last week and was told Apple's engineering team would look into the problem. He received a second phone call today, letting him know the issue had been fixed. From Dillon: For a long time if you had an Apple ID that used a 3rd party email address as your Apple ID you were unable to change it to an Apple email address... even if the Apple address was on the same account. I couple of weeks ago I sent an email addressed to Tim Cook, Craig Federighi, Phil Schiller, and Eddy Cue. I explained the situation and asked if they could fix it. Last week I received an email and phone call from someone at Apple Executive Relations. The women I spoke to told me that the problem would be sent to an engineering team and would be addressed. Today I got another call and email informing me that the issue had been resolved. I tried it out and sure enough... I can finally set my Apple email as my Apple ID!Apple's "Cha

Developer Demonstrates iOS Phishing Attack That Uses Apple-Style Password Request

Developer Felix Krause today shared a proof of concept phishing attack that's gaining some traction as it clearly demonstrates how app developers can use Apple-style popups to gain access to an iPhone user's Apple ID and password. As Krause explains, iPhone and iPad users are accustomed to official Apple requests for their Apple ID and password for making purchases and accessing iCloud, even when not in the App Store or iTunes app. Using a UIAlertController that emulates the design of the system request for a password, developers can create an identical interface as a phishing tool that can fool many iOS users.Showing a dialog that looks just like a system popup is super easy, there is no magic or secret code involved, it's literally the examples provided in the Apple docs, with a custom text. I decided not to open source the actual popup code, however, note that it's less than 30 lines of code and every iOS engineer will be able to quickly build their own phishing code.Though some of the system alerts would require a developer to have a user's Apple ID email address, there are also popup alerts that do not require an email and can recover a password. The phishing method that Krause describes is not new, and Apple vets apps that are accepted to the App Store, but it's worth highlighting for iOS users who may not be aware that such a phishing attempt is possible. As Krause says, users can protect themselves by being wary of these popup dialogues. If one pops up, press the Home button to close the app. If the popup goes away, it's tied to the app and is a

Apple Replaces Support Profiles With New Tool That Only Shows Devices Signed Into Your Apple ID

Apple recently removed Support Profiles from its website, redirecting the page to a new "Get Support" tool that similarly enables customers to check their technical support and service coverage status for iPhones, iPads, Macs, and other Apple products they own. There is, however, one notable difference. The new "Get Support" tool only lists Apple products signed into any given Apple ID, whereas the old Support Profiles page allowed customers to add additional products, including those owned by others. The change is cumbersome for families in particular, as managing multiple devices is now more difficult. The main concern is that users may only have one Apple ID associated with a given device at a time, so now the only way to manage multiple devices is to manually sign in and out of multiple Apple IDs on the website. While not a major problem, a number of MacRumors readers have emailed us with negative feedback about the change. Apple Support Profiles had an "Add Products" option (Image: iPhone-Tricks) The change also prevents non-iCloud devices such as older iPods from being added to the list. Users can manage their devices on their Apple ID account page.

Users Report Some iPhone 7 and 6s Models Activation Locked With Wrong Apple IDs

An increasing number of iPhone users are experiencing an Activation Lock issue in which the device is linked to an Apple ID email address that does not belong to them, according to crowdsourced information from MacRumors and Twitter. MacRumors reader Balders, who recently purchased an iPhone 7 Plus, explained in our discussion forums:Just received my brand new 256GB Jet Black iPhone 7 Plus. Looks immaculate, screen is perfect, machining all fine… Only problem is, it appears someone has already used it as the iPhone is asking for the account used to activate it — o.....@icloud.com. Apple say it needs replacing […] Now got to wait for an expedited replacement iPhone once I've returned this one.With the wrong Apple ID being displayed, users cannot sign in and are therefore unable to proceed with setting up the iPhone. The issue has primarily affected new iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus models upon being turned on for the first time, and iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus models upon being restored to default settings, although older models appear to be affected to a lesser extent. MacRumors user TheKricket said his iPhone 6s suddenly became activation locked:I purchased an iPhone 6s full-price and outright directly from an Apple Store in September 2015. The phone was unlocked (I switched from T-Mobile to Verizon after I purchased it without issue). I recently purchased an iPhone 7 Plus and after that phone was activated on Verizon's network, the iPhone 6s now indicates that it has an "Activation Lock." It is also linked to some unknown iCloud account (not the account I activated

iOS Device Ransom Attacks Continue to Target Users in U.S. and Europe

A few years ago, a number of users in Australia were victimized by attackers remotely locking iPhones, iPads, and Macs using Find My iPhone on iCloud. Compromised devices typically displayed Russian ransom messages demanding payments of around $50 to $100 for the device to be unlocked. A ransom message targeting a Mac in 2014 with the common pseudonym "Oleg Pliss" At the time, IT security expert Troy Hunt noted that the attackers were likely using compromised emails and passwords exposed from various online security breaches to log in to iCloud accounts. AOL and eBay, for example, were among several high-profile companies that suffered data breaches in 2014. Apple later confirmed that iCloud was not compromised, and that the eventually-arrested attackers had instead gained access to Apple IDs and passwords through external sources. Russian website MKRU said the attackers obtained the credentials via phishing pages and social engineering techniques. Since then, CSO security blog Salted Hash has discovered that, since at least February of this year, these ransom attacks have returned and now target users in the U.S. and Europe. The methods used by attackers are said to be the same ones used in 2014, starting with a compromised Apple ID.It starts with a compromised Apple ID. From there, the attacker uses Find My iPhone and places the victim's device into lost mode. At this point, they can lock the device, post a message to the lock screen and trigger a sound to play, drawing attention to it. In each of the cases reported publicly, the ransom demanded is usually

Apple Dropping AOL Sign-In for iTunes and App Store in March

Apple has added a support document to its website stating that customers who use an AOL username to sign into the iTunes Store, App Store or iBooks Store will be unable to continue doing so starting March 31 (via 9to5Mac). Apple customers must convert their AOL username to an Apple ID account in order to maintain access to the storefronts following the deadline."Starting March 31, 2015, AOL will no longer allow customers to use their AOL Username (also known as an AOL Screen Name) to sign in to the iTunes Store, App Store, or iBooks Store. You must convert your AOL Username to an Apple ID in order to maintain access to the stores and to content you purchased previously."Apple will no longer provide support for AOL usernames that are not converted following March 31. The transition does not affect any iTunes purchases made with the AOL username or any other AOL services that may be associated with the account. To begin the transition process, users must sign into iTunes with an AOL username and follow the on-screen