Guides

iOS 13 Hidden Features: Mute Mail Threads, Silence Unknown Callers, Reading Goals, Low Data Mode and More

Apple this week debuted iOS 13 with a ton of updates, including a new dark mode option, major performance improvements, faster Face ID, simpler photo editing tools and a new Photos interface, a Sign In With Apple Privacy feature, a swipe-based keyboard, and tons more. In addition to these features that made it into Apple's keynote event, there are dozens if not hundreds of smaller new changes and tweaks that are included in iOS 13. Below, we've rounded up a comprehensive list of new and notable "hidden" features in iOS 13. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. - Wi-Fi Options in Control Center - You can change WiFi networks right from Control Center, but it's a bit annoying to get to. Long press in the middle of the WiFi/Bluetooth widget to bring up the extended options, and then Force Touch the WiFi icon to see a list of networks available. - Bluetooth Options in Control Center - As with Wifi, you can access your list of available Bluetooth devices from the Control Center. Long press in the middle of the WiFi/Bluetooth widget to bring up the extended options and then Force Touch on the Bluetooth icon to see a list of Bluetooth devices you've connected to before. - Location Settings - Apple mentioned during the keynote that location access is getting scaled back in iOS 13, and in the Settings app, there's a new option that requires an app to ask each time it wants to access your location. - Block Senders in Mail - In iOS 13, your list of blocked phone numbers and contacts extends to the Mail app, which lets you block people

What to Expect at WWDC: iOS 13, macOS 10.15, watchOS 6 and tvOS 13

Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference is set to kick off on June 3 with a keynote event that will see Apple unveiling next-generation versions of iOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS. We've rounded up all of the rumors that we're heard so far about the features we can expect in each of the new operating systems. Watch the video below and read on to get a glimpse of what's coming. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Many of these rumors have been sourced from Bloomberg's Mark Gurman and 9to5Mac's Guilherme Rambo, both of whom have shared details on what's coming in 2019. iOS 13 iOS 13 is going to be a major update, introducing some features that iOS users have been hoping will come to the iPhone and the iPad for quite some time. Below, we'll outline all of the major features that we're expecting, with full details on iOS 13 available in our iOS 13 roundup. iOS 13, like iOS 12, is expected to introduce speed improvements for devices, including older devices, and it will include bug fixes thanks to Apple's 2018 plan to put more focus on quality. Dark Mode iOS 13 will introduce a dark mode for the first time, letting users choose between light and dark themes. There aren't a lot of details on dark mode at this time, but it's expected to be a system wide feature much like the dark mode that came in macOS Mojave. Apps that are currently light mode only will have darker themes available when dark mode is set, much like Books or Maps, existing apps that have a darker night mode. Leaked screenshots of iOS 13 suggest the Dark Mode option

Seven Safari Tricks on iOS You Might Not Know

Safari on iOS has a surprising number of hidden tricks, letting you manipulate tabs, conduct page-specific searches, and more, and not all of these features are immediately obvious due to the gestures involved. We've rounded up some useful must-know Safari tips that you might not be aware of or may have forgotten, so make sure to check out our video because we bet there's something here that's going to be new to you. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Close All Tabs - Have hundreds of tabs open in Safari on your iPhone? You can close them all at once. Just long press right on the "Done" button in the tab view (which you can get to by pressing the little icon that looks like two squares) and you'll see an option to close all tabs. Open Recently Closed Tabs - Accidentally closed a tab you didn't want to close? In the tab view, long press on the "+" button and it will bring up a list of tabs that you've closed recently so you can open it right back up. Search Your Open Tabs - With tons of tabs, you might need to do some hunting around to find the specific tab you're looking for, but luckily, a built-in tab search feature makes this easier. Just scroll to the top of your tabs view (or tap the top of the screen to jump to the top) and you'll see a search bar for searching tabs. Close Filtered Tabs - If you want to close some of your tabs while leaving the rest open, the search feature doubles as a filter. After doing a search in your tabs, long press on the "Cancel" button next to the search interface and you'll see an option to

32-Bit Apps 'Not Optimized for Your Mac' to Stop Working on macOS Catalina

When macOS Mojave was announced, Apple warned that it would be the last version of macOS that would support older 32-bit apps. Apple has been phasing out 32-bit apps for the last 10 years and is now ready to take the final step, even if Mac users may not be ready to lose access to older apps. In September, when macOS Catalina comes out, 32-bit app support will not be available, which means many of your older apps could potentially stop working if they're not updated to 64-bit. 32-bit vs. 64-bit 32-bit apps date back to a time when there were 32-bit processors and 32-bit operating systems, but are now outdated. Apple has long since transitioned to 64-bit processors and macOS has been 64-bit since the launch of Snow Leopard in 2009. Compared to 32-bit apps, 64-bit apps can take advantage of more memory and offer faster system performance. Apple technologies like Metal only work with 64-bit apps, and for Apple to ensure that Mac apps include all of the latest advancements and optimizations, support for 32-bit needs to end. In the simplest terms, 32-bit apps are inefficient. 32-bit apps can run on a 64-bit system as they've been doing for years, but Apple wants to get rid of outdated apps to make sure everything that runs on the Mac is properly optimized and isn't an unnecessary drain on system resources. Current Warnings Apple started warning Mac users about plans to end support for 32-bit apps back with macOS High Sierra. In High Sierra, users started getting warnings about a 32-bit app's future incompatibility with macOS. A similar message is

iOS 13's Dark Mode

One of iOS 13's major new features is a systemwide Dark Mode option, which matches the Dark Mode feature we got in macOS Mojave last year. Enabling Dark Mode can be done through the Settings app on the iPhone (or iPad) under the Display & Brightness section. You can select Light or Dark mode, or choose to enable them based on the time of day (Sunrise to Sunset) or a custom-picked schedule. If you long press on the Brightness indicator in Control Center, you can toggle on Dark Mode from there if you don't want to use the Settings app. Turning on Dark Mode changes the look of the entire operating system, darkening everything from the wallpaper and the Home screen to individual apps. Speaking of wallpaper, iOS 13 has several new wallpapers available, which turn colors from light to dark based on which mode you have activated. You'll see darker themes in all of your apps, from Settings and Photos to Apple Music. Messages and Phone have new darker interfaces that are easier on the eyes when Dark Mode is activated. Apple has put a lot of work into Dark Mode, and most Apple apps at this time are supporting the feature. Maps already had a nighttime Dark Mode, but now it's activated all the time when Dark Mode is turned on. Dark themes are available in Mail and Apple News. The App Store, the Reminders app, and even the Health app have Dark Mode interfaces, as do other apps like Home (though it was already dark) and Wallet. Other apps shown in Dark Mode include Shortcuts, Notes, and Contacts. Safari has a dark theme too, but it looks best

iPhone Accessories Guide: Our Favorite Picks for 2019

The iPhone has been around for more than 10 years, which has given accessory manufacturers time to come up with all manner of useful add-ons that enhance, protect, and charge your iPhone. There are so many iPhone accessories on the market that we can't go through them all, but in this guide, we're highlighting some products that we think are among the best accessories you can get for the iPhone. We'll be updating this guide over time to add new items, remove old items, and highlight great products we come across, so make sure to check back in from time to time. Cases and Screen Protectors There are an endless number of iPhone cases and screen protectors on the market, and here at MacRumors, we've tested much of what's available. I'm not going to go through every iPhone case that you can get because that list would be endless, but will instead highlight some of the favorites that we've used over the years and some of the favorite brands of our readers. - Silicone Cases from Apple ($35 to $39) - Apple designs iPhone cases to go along with its iPhones, and because these are Apple created, they're a perfect fit for every iPhone. Apple's silicone cases are grippy, thin enough not to add a lot of bulk, and, most importantly, protective. I've been using silicone cases almost exclusively on my iPhones since the iPhone 6, and through many, many drops, some quite significant, my iPhones have always survived intact. If you don't like the feel of silicone, which some people don't, Apple also has a great selection of leather cases that are just as protective.

Apple Trade-In Guide: Getting the Most Money Back

Trading in an old iPhone, iPad, or Mac can get you some extra cash to spend on a new device. Depending on where you decide to sell your device, you can get cash back or a gift card for a specific company like Apple, Amazon, or Best Buy. What's most important to know when trading in a device is that there's no one best site or service. There are so many options out there and prices vary based on device and promotions that might be running, so your absolute best bet if you want to do a trade-in using a trade-in site is to spend 15 to 20 minutes doing price checks on some of the most prominent trade-in sites listed below. Using a comparison site like Flipsy, uSell, or SellCell to compare trade-in prices can also be beneficial when you want to do some shopping around to get the best price for your particular device. Trade-in Options There are generally three options when you have an old device you want to get rid of: Trading it in through a company like Apple or a service like Gazelle, selling it in person via a service like Craigslist, or selling it to a person online through a service like eBay or Swappa. Using a trade-in service is always going to be more simple than selling to a person, but the convenience of doing so will cost you. You're never going to get quite as much money from a trade-in service as you can get from direct sales, but there are some tips and tricks worth knowing before considering a trade-in. Device Condition Device condition is going to make a huge difference in the amount of money that you're able to get back for an iPhone, iPad,

Siri: Everything You Need to Know

Siri is the voice assistant on Apple devices, equivalent to Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana, and Google's Google Assistant. Siri is available across most of Apple's devices, including iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple Watch, Apple TV, and HomePod. You can ask Siri all kinds of questions, from simple queries about the weather to more complex questions about everything from sports scores to the number of calories in food. Siri can also enable or disable settings, find content, set alarms and reminders, place calls and texts, and so much more. This guide covers the basics of Siri, including some of the commands you can use to activate Siri, devices that have Siri included, and devices that support more advanced hands-free "Hey Siri" commands. Activating Siri On an iPhone or iPad, Siri can be activated by holding the Home button on compatible models or holding the Side button on devices without a Home button. On the Mac, you can click on the Siri app icon on the dock or the menu bar, or press and hold the command key and the space bar. On a Mac with a Touch Bar, you can press the Siri icon on the Touch Bar. On 2018 MacBook Air and Pro models or the iMac Pro, you can activate Siri with a "Hey Siri" command. On the Apple Watch, you can say "Hey Siri" to activate Siri. On Apple Watch Series 3 or later with the latest version of Apple Watch, there's a Raise to Speak feature that lets Siri respond to commands even without the Hey Siri trigger word. Just hold the watch near your mouth and speak. Siri can also be activated by holding down on the Digital Crown. On

5G iPhone: When Will Apple Release One?

Cellular connectivity is on the verge of getting a major overhaul with the imminent launch of 5G networks and 5G smartphones. 5G connectivity is much, much faster than 4G LTE, which means in just a few years, we're going to be seeing far faster connection speeds on our devices. 5G technology is coming to both mobile and home networks, with rollouts happening starting in 2019. 5G iPhone Launch Date Multiple rumors dating back months have suggested Apple is going to launch a 5G iPhone in 2020, which means the 2019 iPhones will continue to use 4G. There were questions about whether Apple would be able to secure 5G chips for its 2020 devices given its dispute with Qualcomm, but that litigation has been cleared up and the road to a 5G iPhone in 2020 is clear. Apple won't be prepared to launch 5G iPhones in 2019 and can't afford to wait until 2021 as competitors are already launching 5G smartphones, which makes 2020 Apple's 5G year. 5G Explained 5G is fifth-generation cellular wireless and the successor to 4G. When most people talk about 5G connectivity, they're talking about mmWave, or millimeter wave spectrum. Millimeter wave technology offers a lot of open bandwidth for blazing fast data transfer speeds, but it is highly sensitive to interference from buildings, trees, and other obstacles, which has prevented it from being taken advantage of by cellular companies who have previously focused on low-band and mid-band spectrums for cellular networks. Accessing mmWave spectrum has only become possible over the course of the last few years due to

Foldable iPhone: When Will Apple Join the Trend?

Samsung in 2019 debuted the first folding smartphone, the Galaxy Fold, which is designed to convert from a 4.6-inch smartphone into a 7.3-inch tablet thanks to a hinge in the middle of the device. Samsung's Galaxy Fold is super expensive and reviewers have experienced devices that break after just a couple of days of use, but foldable smartphones are a trend right now, and a trend that Apple might one day adopt. Samsung's Galaxy Fold Foldable iPhone Rumors Hints of a foldable iPhone kicked off in 2016 when rumors suggested LG display would be mass producing foldable displays for smartphones in 2018 and supplying them to companies like Apple and Google. Foldable display concept from LG A 2017 rumor kept the folding iPhone concept alive, indicating Apple was partnering up with LG to develop an iPhone with a foldable display. LG has a number of foldable display prototypes that use flexible OLED panels, including one that folds over like a book and a second that rolls up like a newspaper. Another foldable display concept from LG More recently, Samsung has offered to supply foldable displays to Apple for use in future iPhones, and Apple supplier Corning is working on a foldable glass solution. Corning is a current Apple supplier, and foldable glass from Corning sounds promising for a future iPhone. What's never been clear is if Apple has a foldable iPhone in active development or when such a device might launch. The 2019 iPhone lineup will look like the 2018 iPhone lineup with three standard iPhones in 5.8, 6.1, and 6.5-inch sizes, and thus far, there have

MacBook Pro / Air Butterfly Keyboard Issues (Repeating, Stuck, Unresponsive)

Apple in 2015 and 2016 introduced updated keyboards for its MacBook and MacBook Pro, debuting new butterfly keys with home switches beneath each key that minimize thickness while also providing a satisfying press under the fingers. Unfortunately, Apple's butterfly keyboards are highly controversial and have been called out as one of the company's worst design decisions due to their penchant for failure due to small particulates like crumbs or heat issues. All butterfly keyboards in MacBook Pro, MacBook, and MacBook Air models introduced since 2016 (and 2015 in the case of the MacBook) have butterfly keys that could be vulnerable to failure, though Apple says the issue has been addressed in new 2019 models. What's the problem? Butterfly keys use a butterfly mechanism that's different from the scissor mechanism used for traditional keyboards. It's called a butterfly mechanism because the components underneath the key resembles a butterfly's wings, with a hinge in the center rather than overlapping like a pair of scissors. Apple swapped to a butterfly mechanism to make a thinner keyboard, which is possible because each key moves less when pressed so less space is needed. The keyboard provides a satisfying amount of travel and stability when each key is pressed, but unfortunately, the thin butterfly mechanism can get jammed up with crumbs, dust, and other particulates, resulting in keys that don't press properly, keys that skip keystrokes, or keys that repeat letters. Keyboard failure is an in Apple's notebooks because replacing the keyboard requires the

HomeKit: Everything You Need to Know

The HomeKit ecosystem may seem daunting and confusing if you're unfamiliar with smart home products, their functionality, and their benefits, but getting started is actually simple and straightforward. Learning the ins and outs of HomeKit after setup does take a bit of effort, but it's not a difficult process and having interlinked electronics that can interact with each other and be automated can save time and really streamline your life. What is HomeKit? HomeKit is Apple's smart home platform, which is designed to let you control various internet-connected home devices -- ranging from thermostats and plugs to window blinds, light bulbs, and more -- with Apple devices. These days, more and more products are internet connected, which is why you've heard the phrase "Internet of Things." The Internet of Things is a confusing mix of "smart" products that connect to the internet and can be controlled by a range of different platforms, from Amazon's Alexa to Google Home to Samsung SmartThings. HomeKit is Apple's "Internet of Things" solution that connects HomeKit-enabled smart accessories together in a way that lets you operate them using your Apple products. What You Can Do With HomeKit HomeKit isn't a product or software, it's a framework that links smart home products together and adds new capabilities to devices like lights, locks, cameras, thermostats, plugs, and more. HomeKit lets you control smart home products using apps on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac, or simple Siri voice commands. While controlling smart home products with Siri or with

Powerbeats Pro vs. AirPods 2

Apple's Beats brand in April announced upgraded wire-free Powerbeats Pro earbuds that are quite similar to Apple's recently released second-generation AirPods, but with a focus on fitness and working out rather than every day use. The two sets of earbuds have a lot in common, but there are some notable differences that are worth pointing out. Read on for a complete comparison of the AirPods 2 and the Powerbeats Pro. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Powerbeats Pro Design vs. AirPods 2 Design AirPods are made for casual use and feature a one size fits all design with a rounded bulb-like earpiece and a microphone-equipped tail that extends out of the ears. There's no additional hook or other mechanism to keep them in the ears. Powerbeats Pro are designed for fitness and have a design similar to prior Powerbeats models with earhooks that fit over the ears to secure them in place along with four ear tips in various sizes for a customizable fit. Powerbeats Pro are meant to stay in the ears during vigorous activity and Apple tested more than 20 configurations before arriving at a design that fits most people. Both the Powerbeats Pro and the AirPods come in charging cases, but while the AirPods charging case is small, compact, and the size of a dental floss container, the Powerbeats Pro charging case is much larger, clamshell-like, and not as pocketable. Sound Differences and Noise Isolation Powerbeats Pro use rubber ear tips in four sizes similar to traditional earbuds, which means they're designed to create a tight fit in the

Powerbeats Pro: Apple's Sporty AirPods Alternative

Apple's Beats brand in April unveiled the Powerbeats Pro, a redesigned wire-free version of its popular fitness-oriented Powerbeats earbuds. Like the AirPods, Powerbeats Pro come with a dedicated charging case that offers 24 hour battery life and an H1 chip for fast connectivity to your devices and Hey Siri support. Our Powerbeats Pro guide has all of the details you need to know about Apple's newest earbuds, which are a highly appealing alternative to the AirPods. Design and Fit The Powerbeats Pro feature a design that's similar to prior Powerbeats models, but Apple says they've been entirely overhauled for an ideal wireless fit. Apple aimed for the best possible fit for most people, testing more than 20 configurations before arriving at the final design. Apple says the Powerbeats Pro use a new "ergonomically angled acoustic housing" that fits comfortably in the concha bowl of the ear. Apple designed the Powerbeats Pro to be 23 percent smaller and 17 percent lighter than the previous-generation Powerbeats 3 earbuds. Like prior Powerbeats models, the Powerbeats Pro feature earhooks that fit over the ears to keep them in place. Apple says the earhook is adjustable, and the Powerbeats themselves can be customized with four sizes of ear tips. The Powerbeats Pro are designed to create a tight fit in the ear to isolate sound, and there's no ambient noise mode, which is something to keep in mind. Powerbeats Pro come with a clamshell-style charging case that's available in black. Like the AirPods charging case, it uses a magnetic closure to keep your

Best Alternatives to Apple's Now-Canceled AirPower

Apple on Friday made the unprecedented move of canceling work on the AirPower, the wireless charging mat that was supposed to charge the Apple Watch, iPhone, and AirPods all at once. There are already a number of AirPower-like alternative products on the market, and we're likely going to be seeing additional replacements in the future. None of these accessories do exactly what the AirPower promised because there are dedicated spots to charge each device, but each option will charge more than one device at one time. 1. Nomad Base Station Apple Watch Edition ($139) - Nomad's Apple Watch Base Station has an Apple Watch charging puck for charging the Apple Watch, along with a double coil Qi wireless charging pad. You can use the wireless charging pad to charge the iPhone horizontally, but if you put the iPhone vertically, it frees up a little spot for charging the AirPods, so all three devices charge at one time. We reviewed the Nomad Base Station and liked it quite a lot, though it is quite expensive. 2. Belkin Boost Up Wireless Charging Dock ($127) - This is another expensive dock, but it's another that we reviewed and liked quite a lot. Belkin's Boost Up Wireless Charging Dock has an upright charging space for wirelessly charging an iPhone and a space for the Apple Watch, but this isn't a dock suitable for the AirPods. Still, it's a good option for dual device charging. 3. ZENS Dual + Watch Wireless Charger (99 euros) - The Dual + Watch Wireless Charger from European company ZENS is another option that we recently reviewed and were impressed with. It has a

Picking the Best iMac to Buy in 2019

If you're considering buying a new iMac but have yet to pin down which machine in Apple's range is right for you, then keep reading. Our expert guide arms you with all the information you need to ensure the model and configuration you choose is best suited to your specific needs. Apple offers essentially three types of iMac, two of which come in several base configurations, and you can customize the internal specifications of your chosen iMac at the point of purchase, so it's a good idea to consider what kind of machine you'll need ahead of time. A well-specced iMac should last you a good few years, and apart from RAM on the 27-inch models, you can't upgrade the internal components of Apple's all-in-one desktops at a later date, so it's important to choose wisely. First, let's take a look at Apple's 4K and 5K iMacs, the two models in the company's range that received the most recent bump in configuration and specs options. 4K and 5K iMacs (2019) In March 2019, Apple refreshed its Retina 4K and 5K iMac all-in-one desktop computers, upgrading the 21.5-inch and 27-inch models with new processors and graphics chips, but sticking with the same tried-and-tested design used since 2012, and the same 4K and 5K displays as the previous generation. Which of these two iMac sizes you should buy is likely going to be driven by display size for most people, as both models are very capable machines for the average user. The 27-inch model does offer more horsepower, however, so if you're looking for maximum performance you'll want to opt for the larger, more expensive

Picking the Best iPad to Buy in 2019

In March 2019, Apple updated its iPad lineup with two new tablets: the fifth-generation iPad mini and the 10.5-inch iPad Air. These models are now part of Apple's full iPad line, also including the 9.7-inch iPad, 11-inch iPad Pro, and 12.9-inch iPad Pro to make five models total. iPad Comparison Which iPad is right for you? If price is your biggest consideration, you'll want to look at the basic 9.7-inch iPad, knowing it has older technology in it. If you're looking for portability, check out the iPad mini, and if you want a mid-sized iPad with a bit more to offer than the entry-level iPad, check out the new iPad Air. What about the iPad Pro? Apple's high-end iPads are in a class by themselves, and it shows in the price. Unless you're a pro-level user or cost is no object, you'll probably want to look to cheaper options, but the iPad Pro models deliver cutting-edge technology for those who need it. With that quick overview out of the way, let's take a look at what each model has to offer. iPad Models 9.7-inch iPad Starting at the low end of the iPad price spectrum, Apple has the basic 9.7-inch iPad starting at $329 for the Wi-Fi only model. This iPad is perfect if you're on a budget as it's also frequently on sale, and is popular in the education field. It has the most important features users are looking for in an iPad, like a generous display, Touch ID, and a decent rear camera, as well as support for the first-generation Apple Pencil if you're into drawing, handwritten notes, and other tasks that don't work quite as well with your finger. That

Apple TV+: Everything We Know So Far

Apple is working on dozens of original TV shows and movies with high-profile directors, producers, and actors, with all of that content set to be available through a new Apple TV+ app that's going to be released this fall. In the guide below, we've rounded up everything that we know about Apple's new streaming TV service. What is Apple TV+? Apple TV+ is the name of Apple's new television service that will be home to the original TV shows and movies that are funded by Apple. There are more than 30 in the works, with a list available in our dedicated Apple TV show guide. Apple is aiming to compete with existing streaming services like Hulu, Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, Showtime, and others with its original content and has brought on huge names ranging from Steven Spielberg and J.J. Abrams to Oprah. Well-known actors and actresses like Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon, and Steve Carell are involved in Apple's upcoming TV shows. What's Apple's goal with original content? Apple says that it wants to make Apple TV+ the home for the "world's most creative storytellers," providing funding and a platform for TV shows, movies, and documentaries with "inspiriting and authentic stories with emotional depth and compelling characters." Apple wants Apple TV+ to offer the "highest quality" original storytelling available. Are there ads? Nope. Apple says that Apple TV+ will be ad-free and available to watch on demand. What's the price? Apple hasn't announced pricing for Apple TV+ yet, but if the company wants to be competitive with Hulu, Netflix,

All of Apple's Original TV Shows and Movies

Apple has more than two dozen original television shows and movies in the works that will debut on Apple TV+ later this year, and in this guide, we've rounded up everything that Apple is working on, including content that we know about and partnerships that Apple has established. Details about TV shows and movies become clearer as these shows are cast and as episodes are filmed, so for some of these titles, we don't have a lot of information at this time. This guide is updated on a regular basis with all new original content details. Amazing Stories "Amazing Stories" is a science fiction and horror anthology series that was created by Steven Spielberg, which ran from 1985 to 1987. Apple has teamed up with Spielberg to revive the show. Apple has ordered 10 new episodes of "Amazing Stories" and is spending more than $5 million per episode. Notable names: Steven Spielberg is set to executive produce. The Morning Show "The Morning Show," as the name suggests, is a morning talk show drama that will take a look inside the lives of the people who help America wake up in the morning. Apple has signed a deal for two seasons of the show, with the two key stars, Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston, set to earn $1.25 million per episode. Notable names: Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Aniston, Steve Carell, Billy Crudup, and Gugu Mbatha-Raw will star in the show. For All Mankind (Filming Finished) "For All Mankind" is a space drama that explores what might have happened in the world if the global space race had never ended. Notable names: Joel

Apple Card: All the Details on Apple's Upcoming Credit Card

Later in the year, Apple is going to launch a new credit card that's linked to Apple Pay and built right into the Wallet app, which iPhone users can sign up for. Apple is partnering with Goldman Sachs for the card, which is going to be optimized for Apple Pay but will still work like a traditional credit card for all of your transactions. There's a lot of fine print associated with the new Apple Card, so we've created this guide to provide details on what you can expect when it launches in the summer. Signing Up for Apple Card According to Apple, signing up for Apple Card will be as simple as opening up the Wallet app, tapping on the Apple Card interface, and walking through the activation steps. Once you've signed up for Apple Card, it will be available for use immediately for digital purchases, suggesting Apple will have some kind of pre-qualified application process in place. Apple says availability is subject to credit approval, so you need to qualify for Apple Card just like you do with any other credit card. For traditional purchases, you will need to wait until Apple ships you the physical Apple Card. Using Apple Card with Apple Pay Apple Card is designed to work with any other credit or debit card stored in the Wallet app for use with Apple Pay. You can set it as the default card and use it for in store purchases on iPhone and online purchases on Apple Watch, iPhone, iPad, and Mac. Using Apple Card for Non-Apple Pay Purchases If you need to pay for purchases that can't be made with Apple Pay, you can use the physical version of the Apple