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Nintendo Debuts New 'Fire Emblem Heroes' Smartphone Game [Update: Coming February 2]

Nintendo today officially announced Fire Emblem Heroes, its next planned mobile game launching on iOS and Android devices in the near future. Positioned as a tactical roleplaying game in the Fire Emblem universe, Fire Emblem Heroes will allow players to level up popular characters from the series and engage in strategic battles. According to Nintendo, the game features a new, original storyline focusing on two warring kingdoms coming together in a bitter clash. Players take on the role of summoners, calling various historic Fire Emblem characters into epic fights. Each battle map is an 8x6 square designed to fit on a smartphone's screen, where players will engage in tactical fights with multiple allies and enemies on the battlefield. Simple controls are included, such as dragging an ally onto an enemy to attack, and a battle victory is achieved when every enemy on a given map is defeated. Nintendo says that despite the simple controls, Fire Emblem fans will find the battle intensity they've come to expect from the series. Nintendo plans to make Fire Emblem Heroes free-to-play, with optional in-app purchases. Fire Emblem Heroes will be available on the Google Play store starting on February 2. Nintendo did not announce a specific release date for iOS devices, saying only that the game will be "available soon." Back in 2015, Nintendo promised to release five smartphone games by March of 2017. The company originally said its Fire Emblem game, along with a new game in the Animal Crossing series, would be released in the fall of 2016, but Nintendo did not

Nintendo Switch Parental Controls App Will Let Parents Remotely Control Switch Console

In the wake of major reveals surrounding the Nintendo Switch and its launch titles, Nintendo has announced a new app coming to smartphone devices that will allow parents to set granular control settings on their family's Switch console (via IGN). The free "Nintendo Switch Parental Controls" app will offer various settings like time limits and remote sleep mode activation, all without a parent having to be near the Switch itself. The basic feature of the app lets adults set customized play times on the Nintendo Switch, and whenever that time limit is reached the system will notify the player in the top left corner of the screen. Whenever the applied time limit is exceeded, parents can use a "last resort" feature and remotely suspend the software being played, ensuring that "further play won't be possible for the rest of the day." Play time limits can be set for each day of the week so parents can allot more time on the weekends, or reward kids on a specific weekday. The app will also send push notifications with details about the console's most-played games "so there's no need to peek over any shoulders," according to Nintendo. Other standard controls include restricting particular ESRB rated games, online communication, and the ability to connect and post to social networks from the Switch. Nintendo says that it hopes the new app can help parents and their kids "enjoy gaming together." During its presentation yesterday, the company also mentioned another app centered around users connecting to their Switch console for online chat, but no details have yet been

Hands-On With Nintendo's New Super Mario Run Game

Nintendo today released its highly anticipated Mario-themed game, Super Mario Run. Super Mario Run offers simple one-handed gameplay in the form of a traditional runner crossed with platform game, but it adds complexity through coin-based score goals, competitions with friends, and a world building component. While Super Mario Run is free to download, it costs $9.99 to unlock the complete game, which is pricy for an iOS title. We went hands-on with Super Mario Run so you can find out just what you get for that $10 investment before you shell out the cash. The free component of Super Mario Run lets you try three levels of the standard Tour mode, which is a collection of Super Mario levels where the goal is to collect as many coins as possible. New and more difficult content goals are unlocked by collecting pink, purple, and black coins. For $9.99, you unlock all six worlds, each of which features three standard levels and then a boss level, for a total of 24 levels. That price tag also gives you 3,000 coins and 20 Rally tickets. Rally tickets are used for the Rally gameplay mode that lets you compete with other players to win Toad villagers. Rally mode is similar to Tour mode, but the goal is to get more coins and more applause than your opponents by doing tricks, defeating enemies, and grabbing bonuses. Toad villagers and coins are both used to build out your Kingdom, adding decorations and little mini games to play. Mini games are small add-on games that give you coins and Rally tickets to put towards expanding your kingdom. Super Mario Run is not a

'Super Mario Run' Launches on App Store for iPhone and iPad

Super Mario Run is now available on the App Store for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, becoming the first official smartphone and tablet game to feature the iconic Nintendo character. The game is a free download with a $10 in-app purchase required to unlock all 24 courses spanning six worlds. The game is a runner designed for one-handed gameplay. Mario runs forward automatically as players tap to jump, collect coins, pounce on Goombas, avoid obstacles, and reach the flagpole at the end of each course before the timer runs out. Ultimately, Mario must rescue Princess Peach from the infamous Bowser. Mario automatically vaults over small obstacles, including Goombas, while players can tap over enemies to perform a vault jump. As the levels get more difficult, players will be tasked with performing long jumps, walking over blocks that launch Mario in a particular direction, and other challenges. Mario can jump off walls and perform a number of stylish moves as players aim to collect pink or purple challenge coins along the way. Challenge coins are often placed near ledges or other difficult to reach areas, requiring an element of skill and precision to collect them all. A challenge mode called Toad Rally allows players to compete with friends or strangers to see who can obtain the highest score. Players must collect coins and perform stylish moves as usual to attract the largest crowd of Toad spectators in order to win. There is no flagpole in this mode, so players keep running until time runs out. Toad Rally requires Rally Tickets, which can be acquired in a

Shigeru Miyamoto: Apple and Nintendo See Eye to Eye on Simplicity

Ahead of the launch of Super Mario Run on iOS later this week, Nintendo video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto sat down with video game site Glixel to share some thoughts on what it was like working with Apple. According to Miyamoto, amid discussions about entering the mobile space, his team set out to build the simplest Mario game they could, doing away with a lot of the complexity that has been added over the years. Apple was an ideal partner because Nintendo felt development support was necessary, and the partnership has led to some heavy promotion of Super Mario Run in the App Store and at Apple retail stores. Apple also helped Nintendo settle on an ideal pricing model after Nintendo shied away from freemium pricing.For Nintendo, we have a lot of kids that play our products. It was important for us to be able to offer Super Mario Run in a way that parents would feel assured that they could buy the game and give it to their kids without having to worry about future transactions. From early on, I thought that Apple would be a good partner so we could work on this new approach.Miyamoto also believes that Apple and Nintendo have a lot of common ground between them, focusing on how people use products and marketing products to a wide range of people. "They put a lot of effort into the interface and making the product simple to use, and that's very consistent with Nintendo," he said, likening a story about a Super NES controller with colored buttons to Apple's colorful Apple logo.In the early days when computers were very complicated things, computer companies were

Super Mario Run Requires Always-On Internet Connection to Play Due to Piracy Concerns

Shigeru Miyamoto has confirmed that Nintendo's upcoming iPhone game Super Mario Run will require an always-on internet connection to play, which Miyamoto said is "a requirement that's been built into the game to support security." The security element is one of the big reasons why the company decided to launch on iPhone first, Miyamoto said, and it helps the game's three separate modes function together while always keeping the software secure and safe, preventing piracy in the process (via Mashable). Creating a standalone "World Tour" mode without the need for an internet connection was discussed, but the developers found that needing to reconnect to the internet when jumping back to the other two modes -- "Toad Rally" and "Kingdom Builder" -- complicated things. "And because those two modes are relying on the network save, we had to integrate the World Tour mode as well," Miyamoto said, through a translation by Nintendo's senior product marketing manager Bill Trinen. I learned today that Super Mario Run requires an internet connection to play. What's the reason for that? Are there any thoughts about an offline mode? For us, we view our software as being a very important asset for us. And also for consumers who are purchasing the game, we want to make sure that we're able to offer it to them in a way that the software is secure, and that they're able to play it in a stable environment. We wanted to be able to leverage that network connection with all three of the [Super Mario Run] modes to keep all of the modes functioning together and offering the game in a

Playable Demos of 'Super Mario Run' in Apple Stores From Today

iOS devices in brick-and-mortar Apple Stores around the world are running playable demos of Nintendo's highly anticipated Super Mario Run from today, December 7, for those eager to get an early taster of the new game. The announcement was made by Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime on Wednesday evening's The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon, during which a playable version of the company's upcoming Switch console was also shown. Super Mario Run is Nintendo's first major attempt to crack mobile gaming and is the first of many titles planned for the platform. Driven by its iconic character, the game is expected to generate millions of dollars in revenue for the company. Engadget has posted a remarkably positive hands-on of the free runner title for anyone interested to learn more. Super Mario Run is set to debut on the App Store on December 15 for iPhone and iPad. The game will be a free download with a $10 in-app purchase required to unlock the full

Creator of 'GBA4iOS' Teases New SNES, Game Boy, and Nintendo 64 iOS Emulator 'Delta'

Developer Riley Testut has begun teasing the launch of a new emulator, called "Delta," coming this December in beta form, presumably for iOS devices. On Delta's teaser site, hazy images of controllers for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System and Nintendo 64 are shown alongside the Game Boy Advance and Game Boy Color. Testut tweeted out the information for Delta yesterday, while also saying goodbye to his previous emulator GBA4iOS. Users were able to get GBA4iOS onto their iOS device without jailbreaking it by setting the iPhone's date back to 2012, but even a 2.0 update to the software made it easier to install the emulator and removed that requirement. A built-in web browser allowed users to install and play original Game Boy, Game Boy Advance, and Game Boy Color ROMs right on their iPhone or iPad. Although the platform has yet to be confirmed, Testut's mention of GBA4iOS alongside the Delta teaser suggests that the new emulator will be for iOS devices. The new website for Delta doesn't confirm how the emulator will handle downloads yet, but will likely be in a similar vein to Testut's previous software emulators. Responding to a few user questions in the original Twitter thread, Testut mentioned that tvOS support is something he wants, but "there are some technical issues right now standing in the way," so the launch is expected to focus on iOS. Goodbye GBA4iOS. Hello, Delta. https://t.co/If4W92MMmf— Riley Testut (@rileytestut) November 21, 2016 Apple often takes a stringent approach to emulators that appear to download on its devices, but it was Nintendo

Nintendo Announces 'Super Mario Run' Will Launch on December 15 for $9.99

Nintendo today confirmed that its iOS endless runner game, Super Mario Run, will launch on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch on December 15 for $9.99, a price that will allow users "full access" to the game's three modes. Players will also be able to download the game for free, gaining limited access to elements from each mode so that they can try out the game before deciding whether or not they want to buy it. “The wait is almost over for a Super Mario game that can be played on mobile devices,” said Doug Bowser, Nintendo of America’s Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing. “Developed under the direction of Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto, Super Mario Run brings a new take on the series’ beloved action-platforming gameplay to iPhone and iPad for the first time.” The game will be compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices running iOS 8 or later, and launch in 151 countries on December 15. Additionally, Super Mario Run will support the following languages: English, Japanese, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Russian and traditional Chinese. The game was first announced at Apple's September 7 iPhone event, and will have Mario running to the right with users tapping to make him jump and avoid enemies in order to complete each

Sony Details Smartphone Gaming Plans, Launching More Than Five Titles by March 2018

Sony today confirmed that it is working on creating more than five smartphone games for iOS and Android, all expected to launch before March 2018 (via CNBC). The games will be created through Sony's ForwardWorks subsidiary, which it formed earlier in March of this year as a way to craft "full-fledged game titles" for smartphones. At the time of that announcement, the company hadn't detailed the launch plan, or specified how many games it wanted to create, so today marks the first time it talks about its smartphone gaming plans since then. Known in March and reiterated today, the Sony iOS and Android games will first hit Japan and other Asian countries, with the expectation being that each game will then slowly rollout wider after the initial release. Despite consistently strong sales figures for its PlayStation 4 system, the company's aim at Japan is an attempt to battle low console sales in a country where users are more likely to spend their time picking up mobile and smartphone games rather than sit in front of a home console system. "Japan is a market where Sony and other console makers are struggling to sell units. Sony had to react. People are consuming smartphone games like there is no tomorrow," Serkan Toto, CEO of Japanese gaming consultant and advisory group Kantan Games, told CNBC by phone. Sony has still yet to confirm which games and franchises might receive the smartphone treatment, but any of its first party franchises published under Sony Interactive Entertainment -- Uncharted, Sly Cooper, Ratchet & Clank, God of War -- could be fair game.

Apple's Tim Cook Meets Nintendo's Shigeru Miyamoto During Japan Visit

While on a visit to Japan, Apple CEO Tim Cook met with Nintendo's legendary game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. Earlier this morning, Cook posted a good morning greeting from the county alongside a picture of him walking through torii, traditional Japanese gates that are often posted outside of shrines. Photo via Tim Cook Cook tweeted that he was learning how to play the upcoming Super Mario Run as he met with Miyamoto and his team at Nintendo's Kyoto headquarters. Miyamoto appeared at Apple's September special event and announced that the new game would appear on iOS by the end of the year. Nintendo had consistently refused to license its intellectual property to other platforms, fearing that it would threaten its console and handheld-based business model. However, in early 2015 it changed its mind, announcing that it would partner with Japanese mobile game make DeNA to release 5 mobile games by March 2017. Miyamoto says the Japanese game maker had realized that most children's first interaction with technology is more likely to be a parent's smartphone than one of its game consoles. By putting simple games based on its biggest characters, like Mario, on mobile devices the company hopes that it can convince players to migrate over to its first-party hardware for more complex experiences. In addition to Super Mario Run, Nintendo and DeNA plan to release Animal Crossing and Fire Emblem this fall, though details for the latter two games have been scarce thus far. Cook's Japan trip comes shortly after the CEO made a stop in Shenzhen, China, announcing that Apple

Shigeru Miyamoto Hopes 'Super Mario Run' Will Draw Users to Nintendo's Hardware for More In-Depth Experiences

One of the first major surprises out of Apple's September 7 event was the appearance of game designer Shigeru Miyamoto, and the announcement of an all-new Mario game for iOS called Super Mario Run. In the game, players will help Mario navigate various worlds by tapping on the screen to help the plumber jump, dodge, and slide past obstacles and enemies until they reach the flag pole at the end of the stage. During Apple's event, Miyamoto and senior product marketing manager for Nintendo, Bill Trinen, explained the mechanics of the game and its intent for quick burst, one-handed smartphone gaming. Now, in a recent interview with The Verge, Miyamoto divulged more information on the iPhone game, potentially hinting at what the company's outlook on mobile gaming could mean for the other two upcoming DeNA iOS games, Animal Crossing and Fire Emblem. Image via The Verge In its time with Super Mario Run, The Verge commented that the game underscores the company's strategy of introducing addicting, but modest experiences on mobile in order to win more players over with full-fledged console games. Super Mario Run ultimately started as an idea that "was too simple for a home console device," Miyamoto said, and that the company's "main focus" is still convincing players to migrate over to its first-party hardware. Still, Miyamoto said he hopes people are "going to want to play a much more in-depth and a more challenging Mario experience … it’s going to increase the population of people interested in coming to our platforms, which is of course is our main focus." It looks to

Homebrew Enthusiasts Emulate Macintosh Plus on Nintendo 3DS

While the Macintosh Plus was discontinued over 25 years ago, two developers have brought the old school machine back to life in the form of a Nintendo 2DS and 3DS. The first developer, who uses the pseudonym TarableCode, managed to port the Mini vMac emulator to Nintendo 2DS and has since shared pictures and technical details of her homebrew accomplishment on video game community GBAtemp. The code for Mini vMac for Nintendo 2DS/3DS is available on GitHub. The photo shows the Nintendo 2DS is running Macintosh System 7.5.3, retroactively called Mac OS 7, released in 1996. The 2DS's directional pad functions as arrow keys, while the L and R shoulder buttons are the mouse buttons, the Y button toggles the on-screen keyboard, and both the circle pad and touchscreen move the mouse. A fellow homebrew enthusiast who uses the pseudonym LarBob Doomer has since uploaded a YouTube video that shows the emulated Macintosh Plus experience in action on Nintendo 3DS. In the video, he scrolls through a functional version of System 6, and opens apps, inputs text from the keyboard, and eventually powers off the device. The practical applications of 20-year-old Mac software running on Nintendo 3DS are obviously limited, but the homebrew emulator is a unique proof of concept. In the past, developer Nick Lee similarly managed to get both Macintosh System 7.5.5 and Windows 95 to run on an Apple Watch. (Thanks, Mitch!)

'Pokemon Go' Driving Foot Traffic to Local Businesses

The success of Pokemon Go has had many real-world ramifications recently, including cautionary tales of car accidents, thieves using the game to stage robberies, and Nintendo's shares jumping 25%, or $7.5 billion, in days. The new augmented reality game is also driving business to local restaurants and bars, according to a new report from Bloomberg. Food and drink sales spiked by about 30 percent compared to a typical weekend, according to [L'Inizio's Pizzar Bar] manager Sean Benedetti. It was part luck—the game chooses which public locations to imbue with special significance in its virtual world—but there was also savvy strategy. Benedetti, 29, spent about $10 on "Lure Modules," an in-game purchase that attracts Pokémon to a specified location. Players soon picked up on the fact that L’inizio’s was well worth visiting. “People are coming out of the woodwork because of this game,” he said.Pacific Standard co-owner Ryan Kahl told Bloomberg that while the game has increased foot traffic in his Brooklyn-based bar, he hasn't yet seen the traffic translate into business. "We had one guy run to the back because he had a rare Pokemon," he said. "It's been a little weird." However, Kahl said he had not tried to see if using "Lure Modules" would make a difference, noting that he's hoping it gets hot enough that adventuring players need to refuel. Pokemon Go. Got. Real. (Thanks, @Clatham78) pic.twitter.com/fjrtOw97CD— James Bartholomeou (@Iyagovos) July 8, 2016 Some businesses have taken to hanging up signs alerting players how it does or does not support the game. Pacific

Nintendo Shares Jump by 25% on 'Pokémon Go' Mobile Success

Nintendo shares jumped by nearly a quarter today following the runaway success of its long-awaited Pokémon Go mobile game released last week (via Reuters). Stock spiked as much as 25% ($7.5 billion), a record since it began trading in Tokyo in 1983. According to Bloomberg, shares of the Kyoto-based company have climbed 34% in the past two days of trading after the game was released for iPhone and Android devices. For those unfamiliar with Pokémon Go, the game uses augmented reality and real-world maps so users can venture into the real world to look for Pokémon to capture. Once collected, Pokémon can be leveled up and used for battle, with in-app purchases forming part of the game's progress mechanic. The game debuted at the top of the App Store's Free Apps Chart in the U.S., Australia and New Zealand last week and is set to be released in Japan and other major markets soon. The game itself was created by Niantic, spun off from Google last year, and The Pokémon Company. Nintendo owns a third of Pokémon Company and both have undisclosed stakes in Niantic. Many iPhone users in India, Singapore, Germany and the U.K. appear to be unwittingly downloading fake app Go Catch Em All, which is also hovering around the top spot in regional Free Apps charts. Pocket Go Poke Evolution and Poke Poke Go are two other clones feeding off Nintendo's success story. Speaking to TechInsider, Pokémon developers Niantic promised that Go players will soon be able to trade characters, encouraging more interaction in the AR world. Other new features will include more ways to

'Pokemon GO' Begins Rolling Out in the App Store

Nintendo, The Pokemon Company and Niantic's augmented reality game Pokemon GO is rolling out in the App Store now. The game is available in New Zealand, Australia and is propagating through the App Store around the world and in the U.S. The game uses augmented reality and real-world maps to allow users to venture into the real world to look for Pokemon to capture. Once collected, Pokemon can be leveled up, traded and used for battle. They can also be assigned to defend Gyms from other players. Gyms, like Pokemon, can be found by wandering out into the real world. When a player is wandering through their neighborhood and a Pokemon is nearby, the game will send the player a notification. Certain Pokemon and items are only available in select locations. For instance, water Pokemon are available near bodies of water while certain PokeBalls are located near museums and other points of interest. Players can also purchase an optional accessory called Pokemon GO Plus, a wrist-worn device that syncs with the game and alerts users to events happening in the game within their physical vicinity, like the appearance of a new Pokemon. Our sister site TouchArcade shared some thoughts on the app compared to its beefier, handheld cousins on Nintendo DS. While the feedback from the beta hasn't been entirely positive, and it's questionable whether the game will live up to the hidden complexity of the Nintendo handheld titles, Pokemon GO will certainly fill a void for anyone looking for critter catching action on their smartphone. Pokemon GO is Nintendo's second game for iOS

Nintendo Considering Creating Physical Controllers for Smartphones and Tablets

As a part of its push into mobile gaming, Nintendo is considering creating physical controllers and other kinds of hardware for different types of mobile games and experiences, reports Polygon. Shinya Takahashi, Nintendo's general manager of entertainment planning and development, discussed the possibility at the company's annual shareholders meeting. "Physical controllers for smart device applications are available in the market and it is possible that we may also develop something new by ourselves," Takahashi said. "I believe Nintendo's way of thinking is to look at whether action games are really not impossible (without a physical controller for smart device applications) to create and how we can make it happen to create such a game."In the console and handheld gaming spaces, Nintendo has taken to crafting unique controllers that the company can take advantage of with its first-party games. Nintendo's unique controllers include a reverse trident design, motion control remotes and dual-screen handhelds. Apple added support for iOS game controllers with iOS 7, expanding its Made for iPhone program to include game controller accessories. More recently, the company dropped its requirement for tvOS games to support the Siri Remote, allowing game developers to create more complex games for the fourth-generation Apple TV. Nintendo also reiterated its commitment to create mobile app experiences that aren't games, like its social lifestyle game / app Miitomo. The company still has plans to release five smartphone games by March 2017, with Miitomo already released and P

Pokémon GO Likely Coming to iOS Devices in July

During a live streaming event at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles, Nintendo today hinted at an official launch timeframe for Pokémon GO, a highly anticipated augmented reality game that will allow users to catch Pokémon in the world around them. In a call between Nintendo, The Pokémon Company, and Niantic Labs, Nintendo's Shigeru Miyamoto showed off the Pokémon GO Plus device, which is a Bluetooth wearable accessory that will allow players to get alerts for nearby Pokémon without the need to keep a close eye on their iPhones. During the presentation, Miyamoto mentioned that the GO Plus device will ship by the end of July, and because the accessory is dependent on the game, Pokémon GO will also need to launch during that same timeframe. As TechCrunch points out, this isn't concrete launch information, but it does narrow down the potential launch window. The Pokémon GO Plus, which Nintendo will sell for $35, will flash green when a Pokémon is nearby, and it's also able to throw Poké Balls to catch Pokémon that can be transferred to an iPhone. Pokémon GO is currently being tested in several countries around the world, and many details have leaked out about the game. When walking around, users will come across Pokémon hidden in the wild and will receive a notification whenever a Pokémon is discovered. Using an iPhone, players will aim a Poké Ball at a Pokémon to capture it. Poké Balls, Pokémon Eggs, and other accessories will be obtainable at "PokéStops," which are located in places like public art installations, historical markers, and

New Data Suggests 'Users Didn't Really Get Miitomo,' Leading to its Decline

After a few weeks of news surrounding Nintendo's continued push into smartphone gaming, the company's first app -- Miitomo -- slowly started to disappear from the conversation as users began to abandon the app. Nintendo celebrated an impressive 10 million user downloads a few weeks after Miitomo's release, but since then little news or talk has been circling from Nintendo itself or the game's original downloaders. A new report by SurveyMonkey attempts to drill down to the reasoning behind Miitomo's rise and fall, which occurred all in the span of about two months. To do so, the site compared Miitomo to King's Candy Crush Saga and Supercell's Clash of Clans, two games which not only debuted big, but kept players engaged frequently on a week-by-week basis. All three games had a similar huge download spike at launch, with Candy Crush Saga topping the charts, followed by a downturn in downloads in the subsequent weeks. The difference between the games is that those belonging to King and Supercell saw continued user engagement by the gamers who originally downloaded them. According to SurveyMonkey's numbers, Clash Royale is played on average 4.2 days per week by its users, while Candy Crush Saga is played 3.3 days each week. Miitomo, on the other hand, sees users returning just 2.3 days per week. The site's leading theory on this low return rate statistic is a fanbase that "didn't really get Miitomo." In Miitomo’s case, this lower-than-peers engagement translates into higher churn. The game’s weekly churn more than 50% means that over half of the users of Miitomo

Nintendo's Next Two Mobile Games to Adopt Free-to-Play Model

Following the announcement that Nintendo's next two mobile gaming apps will center around the Animal Crossing and Fire Emblem franchises, DeNA Chief Executive Isao Moriyasu today mentioned to The Wall Street Journal that both games will be "free-to-start apps," which a Nintendo spokeswoman has now confirmed. DeNA is the Tokyo-based mobile gaming studio assisting with the creation of Nintendo's five smartphone titles, still on a planned trajectory for launch before March 2017. When Animal Crossing and Fire Emblem were announced for iPhone and Android last month, neither company confirmed the payment strategy the games would adopt for mobile platforms. Nintendo and DeNA's first game, Miitomo, rolled out with a similar free-to-play model where users could end up spending more money in-game on various outfits for their virtual Mii avatar. Although its popularity in the field died down somewhat after initial launch excitement, Nintendo confirmed Miitomo was downloaded and played by over 10 million users worldwide since its debut. In the original announcement, Nintendo said that Fire Emblem and Animal Crossing were both "pure game applications," especially in comparison to Miitomo's more socially-driven atmosphere. What's still unclear is how Nintendo plans to implement in-app purchases within each game, although it seems that the free-to-play model is a continuation of the company's hope to build up a user base consisting of a wide demographic of players, instead of a purely hardcore one who would be willing to pay outright for each title. In earlier announcements