Samsung


'Samsung' Articles

Samsung May Split Company in Two to Allay Investor Concerns

Samsung Electronics announced on Tuesday it is considering splitting itself into a holding company and an operating company in order to boost shareholder value, in what could be the biggest shake-up in the South Korean tech giant's history. According to Reuters, the move is part of a bid to improve investor returns after Samsung came under pressure from shareholders to simplify its business structure. Critics argue that the current structure makes it difficult to value Samsung since its assets are spread across various sister companies and affiliates. Establishing a separate holding firm would bring these under one name, improve transparency, and make it easier to value Samsung Electronics' business. Samsung said it would also increase returns to shareholders by one third and accelerate its share buy-back program. The plans come after U.S. hedge fund Elliot Management, which owns 0.6 percent of Samsung, called for a managed split of the company last month. A split in two of the company has been a subject of speculation among market analysts for a while and would allow Samsung to list on additional stock exchanges around the world. However, some say any potential split could hand more control back to the original family owners and be a particularly favorable outcome for Samsung heir apparent Lee Jae-Yong, who was recently nominated for a seat on the company board. Despite the announcement, Samsung offered little detail on the potential restructuring and said it was "absolutely neutral" about whether to proceed. "The review does not indicate the management or

Samsung Plans to Launch 'Jet Black' Version of Galaxy S7 in Early December

Samsung plans to launch a glossy black version of its nine-month-old Galaxy S7 smartphone early next month, according to The Korea Herald. The report claims the new color will help Samsung compete with the popular Jet Black and Matte Black variants of the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The new color could also fuel additional Galaxy S7 sales to help fill the void left by the permanently discontinued Galaxy Note 7 following battery safety concerns. If the report proves accurate, it would not be the first time Samsung has followed in the footsteps of Apple in terms of smartphone colors. Earlier this year, it released a "pink gold" version of the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge after Apple launched the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus in Rose Gold last year. Samsung's existing Black Onyx variant of the Galaxy S7 already has a somewhat glossy finish, so the new color would presumably be even

Samsung Buying Automobile Accessory Company Harman for $8 Billion

Samsung Electronics has announced that it will spend $8 billion to purchase Harman International Industries Inc, a company which designs and manufactures connected automobile infotainment systems. The buyout of Harman is Samsung's "largest ever overseas acquisition" and sets up the company to become the "go-to supplier" for automobile accessories and systems (via Bloomberg). Harman's customers, including BMW, Volkswagen, and General Motors Co., will now become clients of Samsung following the acquisition, placing the South Korean company in the "top ranks of auto technology suppliers." Harman is a major home audio company as well, with products under brands like JBL, Infinity, Harman/Kardon, and more. The announcement comes a few days after Jay Y. Lee officially became the vice chairman on Samsung's board. According to analyst Park Kang-ho, the acquisition is the first of many moves that solidifies Samsung's "life after smartphones," which Kang-ho believes to be electric vehicles. “This is the first deal cut after Jay Y. joined the board and shows his management style is different from his father. He is an aggressive deal maker,” said Park Kang-ho, an analyst with Daishin Securities Co. “In the longer term, Samsung is thinking that life after smartphones is electric vehicles.” Samsung previously purchased a stake in Chinese electric-car maker BYD Co., but its automotive aspirations appear to momentarily focus solely on continuing its history as a components manufacturer, rather than entering the market with its own vehicle. With Harman, Samsung could produce new

Samsung Runs Full-Page Ads Apologizing to Consumers for Note 7 Fiasco

Samsung has issued a full-page ad in three major U.S. newspapers and published an open letter on its website apologizing to its customers for the Galaxy Note 7 debacle (via The Verge). The print letter was signed by Gregory Lee, president and CEO of Samsung Electronics North America, and appeared in Monday editions of The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. Full-page apology ads are the future of print media: pic.twitter.com/fBAZ9uXFmD— Rurik Bradbury (@RurikBradbury) November 7, 2016 "An important tenet of our mission is to offer best-in-class safety and quality. Recently, we fell short on this promise. For this we are truly sorry. We will re-examine every aspect of the device, including all hardware, software, manufacturing and the overall battery structure. We will move as quickly as possible, but will take the time needed to get the right answers."The online letter was signed by Y H Eom, president and CEO of Samsung Electronics Europe, and apologized similarly to "a small number of affected customers" on the continent, where the Note 7 had yet to go on general sale. Samsung still doesn't know exactly what caused some Note 7 handsets to spontaneously combust, but says it will continue to investigate the device's design and manufacturing process to determine what went wrong. Released in August ahead of Apple's latest iPhone, the Note 7 quickly found itself at the center of a quality control crisis after reports emerged of phones setting on fire, causing injury and property damage. Samsung permanently discontinued the

Samsung Galaxy S8 to Debut 'Viv', the AI Assistant From the Creators of Siri

Samsung said on Sunday it will launch its first AI virtual assistant in next year's Galaxy S8 smartphone, based on technology gained through its acquisition of Viv. Viv is the AI firm run by Dag Kittlaus, co-creator of Apple's Siri. Last month, Samsung bought Viv with the intention of allowing it to operate as an independent company, while providing Samsung with a readymade AI solution that will enable it to go toe-to-toe with Siri, Google Assistant, and Amazon's Alexa. Siri co-creator Dag Kittlaus' Viv AI will appear in Samsung devices According to a Reuters report, Samsung now plans to integrate the AI platform into its Galaxy smartphones and expand voice-assistant services to home appliances and wearable devices. Samsung hopes the AI technology will help revive its momentum in the smartphone industry following the recall and discontinuation of this year's flagship Galaxy Note 7, which will cost the company $5.4 billion in profit through the first quarter of 2017. Samsung didn't mention what types of services the AI would offer in its Galaxy S8, which is due to go on sale next year, but Viv features enhanced contextual understanding which allows it to understand the intent of a user's queries and create its own programs on the fly. "Developers can attach and upload services to our agent," said Samsung Executive Vice President Rhee Injong during a briefing, referring to its AI assistant. "Even if Samsung doesn't do anything on its own, the more services that get attached the smarter this agent will get, learn more new services and provide them to end-users

Samsung's Share of Smartphone Market Drops to Lowest Level in Nearly Two Years

The latest data from market research firm IDC shows Samsung's share of the worldwide smartphone market dropped to 20% in the third quarter -- its lowest market share since recording 19.9% in the fourth quarter of 2014. IDC estimates Samsung shipped 72.5 million smartphones in the quarter, down 13.5% compared to the estimated 83.8 million smartphones it shipped in the year-ago period. The decline can be at least partially attributed to Samsung's disastrous Galaxy Note7 recall in early September, although the impact of that move on the third quarter was limited to only a few weeks. Samsung's market share and financial results will likely suffer more greatly in the fourth quarter as the recall and subsequent discontinuation of the Galaxy Note7 weigh on the entire three-month period. Apple finished runner-up to Samsung as usual with 45.5 million iPhones sold, down 5.3% versus the 48 million iPhones it sold in the same quarter last year. Apple's worldwide market share was 12.5%, down slightly from 13.4% in the year-ago quarter. Samsung's Galaxy Note7 recall could further boost sales of the already-popular iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus heading into the holiday shopping season.Higher than expected iPhone 7 Plus demand outstripped supply, which should be alleviated through the fourth quarter, helped by new features such as water resistance, faster processing, improved optics, and larger storage capacities. A new "jet black" color option has also proven popular with many carriers and retail partners are still showing the device on back order. IDC believes that the iPhone

Samsung Sets up Note 7 Exchange Booths in 'High Traffic' Airports

Samsung has coordinated with aviation officials around the world to set up exchange booths in "high traffic" airport terminals for owners of recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones (via The Verge). The booths first appeared in South Korean airports, with similar exchange sites set to open across Australia and the U.S. for travelers to hand in the potentially dangerous devices. According to one reporter, a Samsung exchange desk manned by the company's staff is already operational at San Francisco's international airport. It's now a federal crime to board a flight with a Note 7 phone, following two global recalls by Samsung that failed to stem reports of the devices setting on fire, which caused property damage and injuries. Anyone caught with a Note 7 on a plane risks facing fines and up to 10 years' imprisonment. Samsung is said to have cut its third quarter operating profit by $2.3 billion and adjusted profit expectations from $6.9 billion to $4.6 billion, following its discontinuation of the ill-fated Note 7. Samsung has a team of representatives at SFO to help customers with the Note7 phone. It's banned from US flights. pic.twitter.com/2IiEcg6hsU— Sergio Quintana (@svqjournalist) October 17, 2016 The company is set to overhaul its mobile strategy next year to ensure product quality, according to one report. A supply source told the Korea Herald that the company is likely to scrap its annual two-flagship models strategy in favor of focusing on a single device. Speculation suggests that would be the Galaxy S8, expected to launch in late February 2017,

Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 Smartphone Banned From All U.S. Flights

Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was today banned from all airplanes and flights in the United States by the Department of Transportation, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. It is now labeled as a "forbidden hazardous material" under the Federal Hazardous Material Regulations.Individuals who own or possess a Samsung Galaxy Note7 device may not transport the device on their person, in carry-on baggage, or in checked baggage on flights to, from, or within the United States. This prohibition includes all Samsung Galaxy Note7 devices.The Department of Transportation has issued an emergency order that will prevent the devices from being taken on a flight even when powered down as of Saturday, October 15 at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Galaxy Note 7 smartphones are no longer allowed in checked or carry-on luggage and cannot be shipped as air cargo."We recognize that banning these phones from airlines will inconvenience some passengers, but the safety of all those aboard an aircraft must take priority," said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "We are taking this additional step because even one fire incident inflight poses a high risk of severe personal injury and puts many lives at risk."Customers who attempt to bring a Galaxy Note 7 on a flight could have their devices confiscated and could face fines. Those who attempt to evade the ban by putting their smartphone in their checked luggage could be subject to criminal prosecution in addition to fines. The official flight ban comes just days after Samsung permanently

Samsung Offers Note 7 Recall Customers $100 in Credit to Stay Loyal

Samsung is offering $100 bill credit to U.S. customers caught up in its ill-fated Galaxy Note 7 recall if they're willing to stay loyal to the brand (via TechCrunch). Samsung discontinued the Note 7 earlier this week after handsets deemed safe by the company began setting on fire just like the handsets they replaced. Samsung is now offering those who choose to exchange the phone for any other Samsung device up to $100 credit as a goodwill gesture. Those who opt to exchange the Note 7 for a full refund or for another brand of smartphone are being offered a smaller $25 credit for the hassle. Currently the goodwill credit appears to be limited to U.S customers. Commenting in a statement on the U.S. refund and exchange program, Tim Baxter, president and COO of Samsung Electronics America, said: "We appreciate the patience of our consumers, carrier and retail partners for carrying the burden during these challenging times. We are committed to doing everything we can to make this right."According to a report by The New York Times, Samsung still doesn't know exactly why Note 7 smartphones have been catching fire. The company was apparently unable to replicate the problem at their labs and have so far been unable to identify the exact cause of the issue. Samsung's recall of the devices was made official today via the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, citing "serious fire and burn hazards" to consumers. According to the statement, Samsung has received 96 reports of batteries overheating in the U.S., including 23 new reports since the September 15 recall

Samsung's Note 7 Discontinuation Poised to Cost Company $2.3 Billion

Following confirmation that Samsung has discontinued the Galaxy Note 7 amid its well-publicized fire-catching problems, the company today gave the first indication of how much the move will cost it for the third quarter of 2016. In a report by Bloomberg, Samsung is said to have cut its third quarter operating profit by $2.3 billion and adjusted profit expectations from 7.8 trillion won ($6.9 billion) to 5.2 trillion won ($4.6 billion). The company's projection "effectively erases all the mobile business profit that analysts had been projecting," with revenue expected to dive from 49 trillion won to 47 trillion won. On the wave of Samsung's woes, Apple shares reached a record high this year, but Samsung had yet to divulge its potential quarterly loss. Analyst Greg Roh said that Samsung's prediction accounts not only for defective units, but also "the inventories of Note 7s in the channel as well as the components they bought a few months back.” “This is a huge cutback,” said Greg Roh, an analyst at HMC Investment Securities Co. “It means Samsung has reflected not only the sales loss from the shutdown but it also means it would bear the costs of the inventories of Note 7s in the channel as well as the components they bought a few months back.” Samsung’s mobile division was projected to report operating income of 2.7 trillion won in the quarter, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg. HMC’s Roh said the revised outlook probably erased that number. “We expected the mobile division to see about 2.6 trillion won previously but it will only see a mere 0.3

Apple Shares Hit New High for 2016 as Samsung Considers Scrapping Note 7 [Update: Note 7 Officially Discontinued]

Samsung is likely to permanently stop selling its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones following the latest halt of sales and production, according to reports on Tuesday. Samsung halted sales and paused production of the Note 7 smartphones in the last 24 hours and told owners to power down the devices while it investigates reports of fires, fueling expectations the tech giant will scrap the flagship device. The BBC this morning referred to "unnamed sources" cited by South Korean Hankyoreh newspaper claiming that Samsung would can the device and seek to make up for lost Note 7 sales through its Galaxy S7 models as well as the Note 5, which was the predecessor for the Note 7. Separately, Reuters reported Samsung is now considering permanently halting sales of its flagship smartphones as an option, "according to a source familiar with the matter". The person declined to be identified because they were not authorized to speak publicly. Samsung did not immediately comment on the BBC report, but told Reuters no final decision had been made. Meanwhile, the South Korean finance minister said it would hurt the country's exports if the device is scrapped altogether.   "Right now we can't tell what the impact will be in the long term. It's up to the company and the government cannot interfere," Yoo Il-ho said. "But if they do scrap the model, it will have a negative impact on exports."  According to analysts, the Note 7 recall could cost Samsung as many as 19 million lost unit sales, or as much as $17 billion, if it permanently stops selling the smartphone for a second

Samsung Halts Galaxy Note 7 Sales Worldwide

Samsung today announced that it is officially asking its global partners to cease all sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note 7 while it further investigates claims of ongoing safety issues with replacement devices. As of last week, there have been several reports from customers who had their replacement Galaxy Note 7 smartphones, which were deemed safe by Samsung, catch on fire. The devices were supposedly using batteries Samsung said were "not vulnerable to overheating and catching fire." (Image: Shawn Minter) On Wednesday, a flight from Louisville to Baltimore was evacuated when a Note 7 began smoking, and on Saturday, a 13-year-old girl in Minnesota received burns from a defective device while a man in Kentucky suffered from smoke inhalation after his Note 7 caught fire while he was asleep. Two additional reports of replacement Note 7 fires rolled in on Sunday from Virginia and Texas, plus there were reports of fires from Taiwan and South Korea. By Monday morning, all major carriers in the United States had already announced plans to stop sales and "safe" replacements of the Galaxy Note 7, and now sales will temporarily end worldwide. According to Samsung, customers with an original Galaxy Note 7 or a replacement Galaxy Note 7 should shut down their devices and stop using them right away.We are working with relevant regulatory bodies to investigate the recently reported cases involving the Galaxy Note7. Because consumers' safety remains our top priority, Samsung will ask all carrier and retail partners globally to stop sales and exchanges of the Galaxy

Apple and Samsung's Long-Running Design Lawsuit Heading to Supreme Court This Week

Nearly six years after the legal battle over smartphone design similarities began between Apple and Samsung, the two companies are now about to take the case to the United States Supreme Court on Tuesday, October 11. At stake is the outcome of how much of a combined $548 million patent infringement ruling Samsung will be required to pay to Apple (via Bloomberg). That amount is taken from Samsung's total profit of the 11 disputed smartphones targeted by Apple in the trial, an amount which Samsung refers to as a "disproportionate" sum for the patent infringement accusations leveled at it by Apple. The Cupertino company has remained adamant in regards to Samsung's "blatant copying" of various iPhone design features, still fighting to win the full $399 million reward (the case involves approximately another $150 million focused on Samsung's alleged infringement of Apple's pinch-to-zoom patent). Specifically, Apple's design patents cover "the rounded corners of its phones, the rim that surrounds the front face and the grid of icons that users view." Last December, a federal court in San Jose ruled in Apple's favor, and Samsung appealed days later in attempts to avoid the $548 million reward payment to Apple. In Samsung's appeal, the company gave the court a metaphor centering around owing a car's entire profits to a rival company for infringing upon their cup holder design. In urging the Supreme Court to take up the appeal, Samsung said the ruling was akin to awarding the entire profits on a car because of an infringing cup-holder. Apple rejects that analogy,

Samsung Halts Production of Note 7 After Replacement Phones Explode [Updated]

Samsung has halted production of its beleaguered Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after several replacement handsets reportedly caught fire and ended up with at least one person in a hospital. On Monday, an official at a supplier for Samsung informed Korean Yonhap news agency of the decision, which is said to have been made in coordination with consumer safety regulators from South Korea, the United States, and China. (Image: Shawn Minter) The news is another hammer blow to Samsung's mobile division and its 2016 flagship device, as the company reels from a second round of exploding phone incidents indicating that the replacement handset program at the center of its global recall efforts has failed. The decision came after all mobile carriers in the U.S. said they would stop issuing Note 7 devices following at least five reports of replacement handsets catching fire over the last five days. On Wednesday, a flight from Louisville to Baltimore was evacuated while still at the gate because of a smoking Note 7. Saturday saw a Minnesota case involving a 13-year-old girl who said she felt a "weird, burning sensation" while holding her phone and suffered a minor burn to her thumb. "It felt like pins and needles except a lot more intense," she said. Later the same day, a Kentucky man reported "vomiting black" after his Note 7 caught fire while he was asleep in bed, filling his room with smoke. "It wasn't plugged in. It wasn't anything, it was just sitting there," said the man, who later took himself to ER and was diagnosed with acute bronchitis. Then on Sunday, another

AT&T Considering Halting All Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Sales and Replacements

AT&T is considering stopping all sales and replacements of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 due to ongoing safety issues, reports Bloomberg. Citing a person "familiar with the situation," Bloomberg says AT&T may halt sales as soon as today. AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint have all started allowing customers to exchange their Galaxy Note 7 devices for different smartphones such as the iPhone 7, but AT&T's full sales ban would go one step further, seeing the company cease offering "safe" replacement devices altogether. Samsung first issued a recall of the Galaxy Note 7 in early September following dozens of reports of overheating, leading to batteries that explode and catch on fire. Many people who purchased a Galaxy Note 7 have reported injuries and property damage. While Samsung has replaced more than one million Galaxy Note 7 devices with versions that are said to have batteries that are "not vulnerable to overheating and catching fire," at least one report suggests the replacement devices are also prone to problems. Earlier this week, a Southwest flight from Louisville to Baltimore was evacuated after a Galaxy Note 7 started smoking and caught fire, unusual because the device in question was a replacement smartphone that had been deemed safe by Samsung. Federal regulators are investigating the incident, which has reignited fears about Samsung devices. According to rumors, Samsung rushed the Galaxy Note 7 into production in an effort to outshine Apple after hearing that the iPhone 7 would not feature major design changes. Suppliers were pushed to meet

Samsung Owes Apple $120 Million in Longstanding Slide-to-Unlock Lawsuit

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has reinstated Apple's $119.6 million award in a longstanding patent lawsuit with Samsung, after eight of twelve judges ruled it was wrong to throw out the verdict in February.The bulk of the award, $98.7 million, was for the detection patent that the earlier panel said wasn’t infringed. The February decision also said the other two patents were invalid. […] That was a wrong decision, the court ruled Friday, because it relied on issues that were never raised on appeal or on information that was beyond the trial record.The long-running lawsuit dates back to 2011, when Apple accused Samsung of infringing upon its now-retired slide-to-unlock feature, autocorrect, and a method of detecting phone numbers so they can be tapped to make phone calls, according to Bloomberg. The case is not to be confused with a similar Apple v. Samsung lawsuit related to accusations of older Galaxy smartphones infringing upon the iPhone's design. The appeals court will argue that second case, also dating back to 2011, on Tuesday to determine how much Samsung should pay for copying the look and feel of the iPhone, according to the report. Samsung was originally ordered to pay Apple damages of $548 million, but it appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court in December as a last-ditch effort to avoid paying the settlement. In August, over 100 world-renowned designers, including Calvin Klein, Dieter Rams, and Norman Foster, filed an amicus brief in support of Apple in the lawsuit. The designers argued that a product's visual design has "powerful effects

Samsung Quarterly Earnings Guidance Shrugs Off Galaxy Note 7 Woes

Samsung announced strong third-quarter earnings guidance to investors on Friday despite its exploding smartphone woes, thanks in part to the company's component and display panel business. The Korean technology firm said it expects to earn $7 billion in operating profit for the three months ended September 30 – a 5.5 percent improvement from a year earlier – in a quarter that includes Samsung's recall of 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7 smartphones. The company's final earnings won't be released until later in October, but the profit preview demonstrates Samsung's ability to rely on other phone and PC makers to drive sales, and underlines the robustness of Samsung's diversified business model during difficult times. The company is now the undisputed market leader in DRAM memory chips and next-generation 3-D NAND flash memory chips. Samsung also has a substantial lead over its rivals in sales of OLED panels, which are increasingly being adopted for use in smartphones. Currently, Apple's only supplier signed on to create OLED displays for the iPhone 8 is Samsung. The exploding Note 7 debacle has dominated headlines recently, with a U.S. passenger plane being evacuated just this week when one of the phones began emitting smoke. Shares dipped 13 percent following initial reports of the widespread problem, which analysts estimate cost the company between $1 and $5 billion, not discounting significant damage to its smartphone brand. And yet shareholders' confidence in Samsung's semiconductor and display manufacturing have seen shares rebound into record territory.

Fire on Plane Caused by Replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Over the past few weeks, Samsung has been replacing recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that have faulty exploding batteries with new devices, but an incident today suggests the South Korean company's smartphone woes aren't over. A Southwest flight from Louisville to Baltimore was today evacuated just before it pulled out of the gate because a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone started smoking. While no one was injured, there is a serious problem -- the Galaxy Note 7 in question was a replacement device that had been deemed "safe" by Samsung. According to The Verge, the owner of the Galaxy Note 7, Brian Green, had replaced his original Galaxy Note at an AT&T store on September 21. The smartphone had a green battery icon and box the device came in features a black square, both of which are indicators of a replacement Note 7. Green told The Verge he had powered down the phone as requested by the flight crew and stowed it in his pocket before it started smoking.He dropped it on the floor of the plane and a "thick grey-green angry smoke" was pouring out of the device. Green's colleague went back onto the plane to retrieve some personal belongings and said that the phone had burned through the carpet and scorched the subfloor of the plane. He said the phone was at around 80 percent of battery capacity when the incident occurred and that he only used a wireless charger since receiving the device.Samsung has already replaced more than one million Galaxy Note 7 devices, and has said the new Note 7 smartphones have batteries "that are not vulnerable to overheating and

Samsung Reports 1 Million Note 7 Users Safe After Recall, but Overheating Stories Persist

Samsung today issued a statement confirming that more than one million of its Galaxy Note 7 customers affected by reports of overheating, and sometimes explosions, are now using devices with batteries "that are not vulnerable to overheating and catching fire" (via Recode). Following the initial wave of reports, earlier in the month Samsung issued an "unprecedented" recall of 2.5 million Note 7 devices less than a month after the smartphone launched. According to the company, the one million figure includes devices issued as replacements in the recall, as well as Note 7 handsets originally sold in China that Samsung has deemed safe because "they used batteries that came from a different supplier to those that could overheat." Still, there are reports within China of exploding Note 7 phones that the company is looking into, which it says is not at the fault of the battery. Samsung, in a statement issued on its China website, apologised to its consumers for failing to providing a detailed explanation why the smartphones on sale in China were safe, as they used batteries that came from a different supplier to those that could overheat. "Currently, the brand new Note 7 products that have been swapped in overseas markets are using identical batteries to those that were supplied and used for the Chinese version," Samsung said. Samsung said it takes reports of Note 7 fires in China very seriously and has conducted inspections on such devices. Batteries for the burnt phones were not at fault, Samsung said, adding its conclusion was also backed up by independent

Apple Edges Samsung to Top U.S. PC Customer Satisfaction Survey for 13th Consecutive Year

The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ASCI) today released its latest results [PDF] on U.S. consumer satisfaction in the personal computer industry, including tablets, with Apple narrowly topping the charts for the thirteenth consecutive year. Apple maintained its year-ago score of 84 out of 100 in the survey, consisting of interviews with 3,500 customers chosen at random and contacted via email in June to share their experiences with recently purchased products like Macs and iPads. Samsung, in its second year of ASCI tracking, trailed just one point behind Apple with a score of 83 out of 100, a 6.4% rise compared to its 2015 score. Much like the smartphone category, the personal computer industry has become a race between Apple and Samsung for both market share and customer satisfaction. Apple and Samsung dominate market share in the tablet category, but the two companies take divergent views on the future of tablets. Apple continues to add laptop-like functionality to iPads, while Samsung sees tablets as additional devices for entertainment and browsing that complement—but not replace—laptops.Amazon, which manufactures affordable Kindle tablets but not traditional PCs, finished third in customer satisfaction with an 80 out of 100 score, while PC makers Acer, ASUS, Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Toshiba rounded off the list with scores between 73 and 78. ACSI's scores are calculated using its so-called cause-and-effect econometric model, which it says is based upon survey-measured inputs of customer expectations, perceptions of quality, and perceptions of value.