AT&T


'AT&T' Articles

AT&T Raises Smartphone Upgrade Pricing From $15 to $20 to Match Verizon's New Fee

Starting last year, AT&T began charging a $15 activation fee for customers who wanted to upgrade to a new smartphone purchased outright or through an AT&T Next plan, and as of yesterday, that fee has been increased from $15 to $20. As Droid Life noticed yesterday, AT&T updated its wireless activation and upgrade fees document to reflect the new $20 pricing on April 6, matching Verizon's recently implemented fee. On Monday, Verizon started charging $20 for activating smartphones purchased through an installment plan or at full retail price, $5 less than AT&T was charging at the time. Less than two days later, AT&T raised its prices to $20. AT&T customers who bring a phone to the AT&T network, purchase a phone using AT&T Next, or purchase a device through Apple's Device Upgrade program will need to pay the one-time activation fee as outlined below. Customers with a two-year contract will need to pay the standard $45 fee, which has not changed.Wireless activation and upgrade fees,1 are one time fees that may be added to your first or next AT&T bill. - Activation and upgrade fees for smartphones with AT&T Next - Activation and upgrade fees are $20 per smartphone added or upgraded with AT&T Next. - Activation fees for installment agreements and bring your own devices - The fee is $20. - Activation and upgrade fees for two year agreement - Fees are $45. Note: Two year agreements are available only on select devices.As Ars Technica points out, AT&T doesn't provide any explanation or justification for the fee that it charges on its website, nor does it give an

AT&T Expands Wi-Fi Calling to Cover International Calls to U.S. When Traveling

AT&T first introduced Wi-Fi calling in October of 2015, allowing customers to place calls over Wi-Fi in instances where a cellular connection is poor. At launch, AT&T's Wi-Fi calling feature could only be used within the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, but as of this week, Wi-Fi calls can also be made from other countries. Starting this afternoon, and following the iOS 9.3 update, AT&T began sending text messages to customers notifying them of the change. When traveling abroad, a call placed to the United States or received from the United States using Wi-Fi calling will incur no long distance charges, a feature that should be highly useful to AT&T customers who are visiting another country and calling home. As long as a U.S. number is calling another U.S. number using Wi-Fi calling, there will be no charge, regardless of physical location. Calling an international number from a U.S. phone with Wi-Fi calling will continue to incur standard international call charges. In a domestic coverage area, Wi-Fi calling is enabled whenever wireless network coverage is weak or unavailable. When outside of a domestic coverage area, Wi-Fi calling is now turned on whenever a phone connects to a Wi-Fi network. AT&T's Wi-Fi calling website has been updated with new text to reflect the updated capabilities.Use Wi-Fi Calling to talk and text over an active Wi-Fi connection. Wi-Fi Calling lets you talk and text from indoor locations where it's hard even for a strong cellular signal to reach. Wi-Fi Calling can be used in the Domestic Coverage Area (U.S., Puerto Rico,

AT&T Expands 'Buy One Get One Free' iPhone Deal to New Customers

AT&T has announced that its "Buy One Get One Free" promotion for iPhones and select other smartphones is now available again for both new and existing customers. The limited time offer requires both smartphones to be purchased on AT&T Next with a qualifying plan. The first device can be a new line or an upgrade, while the second device must be a new line and purchased on AT&T Next 24. After three bill cycles or less, AT&T said customers will start to receive up to $650 in bill credits spread out over 30 monthly payments. The first payment will be a lump sum of any AT&T Next payments to that date. Tax is still due on both smartphones, which must be from the same manufacturer, upon purchase. Last month, T-Mobile announced a similar "BOGO" promotion that offers qualifying Simple Choice customers half off all iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus models, or any iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, with the purchase of another iPhone of equal or greater value. The savings are applied instantly at the point of sale.

AT&T to Begin Testing 5G, 10-100 Times Faster Than 4G LTE

AT&T has announced that it will begin trialing 5G wireless technologies this year, including lab tests in the second quarter and outdoor tests over the summer. The carrier anticipates 5G speeds to be 10-100 times faster than today's average 4G LTE connections, with reduced latency.Customers will see speeds measured in gigabits per second, not megabits. For reference, at one gigabit per second, you can download a TV show in less than 3 seconds. Customers will also see much lower latency with 5G. Latency, for example, is how long it takes after you press play on a video app for the video to start streaming on your device. We expect 5G latency in the range of 1 to 5 milliseconds.Worldwide standards are still lacking for 5G technologies, but the 3GPP group aims to complete the first phase of that process in 2018. The widespread rollout of AT&T's 5G network will likely take until 2020, but the carrier plans to provide wireless connectivity to fixed locations in Austin before the end of this year. The carrier joins Verizon, who will also be field testing 5G solutions this year. AT&T's 5G network will be based on technologies such as millimeter waves, network function virtualization (NFV), and software-defined networking (SDN). The carrier has already migrated 14 million wireless customers to its virtualized network, and it says millions more will be added this year. AT&T plans to virtualize 75% of its network over the next four years in the lead up to 5G. It remains too early to predict Apple's roadmap for 5G connectivity. Apple was quick to support LTE-Advanced, a faster

AT&T Debuts New Unlimited Plan for Phone Customers With DIRECTV or U-Verse

AT&T today announced the first new unlimited data plan possibility for its customers since the company removed the option over five years ago. Officially starting tomorrow, AT&T users who already have or decide to add AT&T DIRECTV or AT&T U-Verse onto their plan can choose to opt-in to an Unlimited Plan, "offering customers more data to use for watching video, playing games and surfing the web on their mobile devices." "Our new unlimited plan is our best offer yet. It’s the perfect reward for our valued customers who like to take advantage of our integrated offers of TV and wireless services,” said Ralph de la Vega, CEO of AT&T Mobile and Business Solutions. “Video traffic continues to grow on our network as fast as ever because people enjoy viewing their favorite video content on their favorite devices.” As it does for current grandfathered customers, the new Unlimited Plan offers unlimited data, talk, and text to its users instead of a month-by-month data allotment. The pricing for the plan begins at $100 per month for the first smartphone, with additional devices costing $40 per month, although the fourth phone can be added at no additional cost. The company noted that today's announcement is the "first of many integrated video and mobility offers" coming to AT&T customers in 2016. AT&T also noted that DIRECTV and U-Verse customers who don't yet have an AT&T wireless subscription can get $500 in credit when beginning the new Unlimited Plan, with one of the company's eligible trade-ins that would go towards the purchase of a new phone on AT&T Next. The alternative is

AT&T to Stop Offering Two-Year Phone Contracts Starting January 8

Starting on January 8, 2016, AT&T plans to introduce a "pricing simplification effort" that will see the end of device subsidies and two-year contracts. According to an internal training document shared by Engadget, new and existing AT&T customers will only be able to purchase a smartphone at full price or with an AT&T Next payment plan going forward. As outlined in the document, the new rules apply to all of the phones that AT&T sells, including smartphones and more basic devices, which will be paid for using new installment plans. More information on how AT&T will handle corporate accounts and non-smartphone devices like tablets and wearables will become available after an official announcement from AT&T, but it appears certain corporate users will be able to continue making two-year contract purchases. The shift away from two-year contracts and iPhone subsidies began with T-Mobile in 2013, when the company introduced its Un-carrier payment plans uncoupling device costs from plan costs. Verizon followed suit in August of 2015, debuting new smartphone rate plans and eliminating its subsidized two-year contract option for new users. Existing Verizon customers can still renew their two-year contracts, but AT&T's no-contract implementation is more extreme and will not offer existing customers the option to keep their contracts once they expire. AT&T has already been working on shifting away from two-year contracts by pushing its Next plans. In June of 2015, AT&T forced Apple and other third-party retailers to remove the option to purchase AT&T phones with a

Free Data Programs From T-Mobile, AT&T and Comcast Scrutinized by FCC

The United States Federal Communications Commission yesterday sent letters to T-Mobile, AT&T, and Comcast questioning the companies about mobile services that allow customers to access certain content without paying for the data usage, reports Bloomberg. While the FCC has been careful to note the inquiry is "not an investigation" and designed to help the FCC "stay informed as to what the practices are," there have been some questions about whether such services violate net neutrality rules. Under scrutiny is T-Mobile's Binge On program, which allows customers to stream 480p video that doesn't count against a data cap, AT&T's Sponsored Data program that lets AT&T customers view sponsored content for free, and Comcast's Stream TV, a video service that does not count against data caps in areas where data caps are imposed. Ars Technica has uploaded a copy of the letters that were sent to the three companies. Back in February, the FCC voted in favor of new net neutrality rules preventing Internet providers from blocking or throttling web traffic or offering prioritized service for payment, but it has not specifically addressed these "zero-rating" data exemption programs. Last month, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said the organization would keep an eye on T-Mobile's Binge On service, but praised it as being both "highly innovative and highly competitive." In a statement, a T-Mobile spokesperson said the company is "looking forward" to talking with the FCC, and believes Binge On is "absolutely in line with net-neutrality rules." Comcast expressed a similar sentiment,

AT&T Offering 'Buy One Get One Free' Deal on iPhone 6s

AT&T on Friday launched a new "Buy One Get One Free" promotion for the Galaxy S6, Galaxy Note 5 and select other Samsung smartphones, and MacRumors has learned the deal also applies to the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus. Beginning today until December 31, 2015, AT&T customers who activate or upgrade to an iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus on AT&T Next are eligible to receive a second 16GB iPhone 6s for free, or a $650 bill credit towards the purchase of another iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus model. The $650 bill credit is spread out into 28 or 30 monthly payments. AT&T Next 24 customers will receive $21.67 over 30 months, while AT&T Next customers with a down payment will receive $23.22 over 28 months, both totaling $650. Any down payments are due at the time of sale, and monthly bill credits will appear within 2-3 bill cycles. The first payment will be a lump sum of any AT&T Next payments to that date. The original AT&T line must remain in good standing for eligibility. AT&T has not publicly advertised its "Buy One Get One Free" deal for the iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus, but customers should be able to visit participating AT&T stores or contact the carrier otherwise to learn more, including exact terms and

T-Mobile Offers AT&T Customers 128GB iPhone 6s for $200 Off to Switch

T-Mobile has announced a third "Un-carrier Unwrapped" holiday promotion that offers AT&T customers a 128GB iPhone 6s for the same price as a 16GB model, which is a $200 savings. The offer is valid for AT&T, GoPhone and Cricket postpaid and prepaid customers that switch a phone number to a T-Mobile Simple Choice postpaid plan between December 4 and December 13. AT&T customers can combine the offer with T-Mobile's Carrier Freedom promotion, which provides up to $650 towards a balance owing or to pay off early termination fees (ETFs) with an eligible device trade-in. T-Mobile is also offering AT&T customers that switch up to half off its lineup of financed in-store accessories:That could mean as much as a $125 discount on the hottest mobile gifts, like the latest smartwatches, UE Boom and JBL Bluetooth speakers, top-of-the-line headphones, Fitbit fitness trackers, Guitar Hero Live for iOS and more.This limited time offer is part of T-Mobile's monthlong "Un-carrier Unwrapped" holiday promotion that began with three months of free unlimited LTE data for all Simple Choice postpaid customers and a $200 bill credit for Sprint customers. T-Mobile plans to unveil additional "gifts" over the next few weeks, with a new gift coming at least once per week. T-Mobile CEO John Legere recently confirmed on Twitter that Verizon customers will receive their "Un-carrier Unwrapped" gift soon. T-Mobile also recently announced that Music Freedom now supports 11 new services: Aud.io, Dash Radio, DatPiff, Jango, KCRW, Noon Pacific, Radio Danz, SomaFM, Spinrilla, StreamOn and TuneIn

AT&T to Raise Price of Grandfathered Unlimited Plans From $30 to $35

AT&T will raise the price of its grandfathered unlimited data plans from $30 to $35 in February of 2016, reports CNBC. The upcoming rate change is detailed on a page on AT&T's website and is the first price hike the unlimited plan has seen in seven years. Though AT&T no longer offers unlimited data plans to customers, a small number of customers continue to hold unlimited data plans that were purchased before AT&T discontinued them in 2010. AT&T's current $30 unlimited data plan allows customers to use an unlimited amount of data, but AT&T does throttle with excessive data usage. As of February 16, the $30 price tag, which is in addition to voice costs, will rise to $35. The price hike comes just a couple of months after AT&T announced changes to its throttling practices. AT&T previously throttled customers on congested networks after 5GB of LTE data usage, but that cap was increased to 22GB in September, making unlimited plans more valuable. AT&T plans to notify customers who will be impacted by the price increase. Customers who wish to cancel their wireless service because of the pricing increase will have early termination fees waived for affected lines. Price changes will take effect during each customer's February billing

Wi-Fi Calling Now Available for AT&T Users

AT&T has flipped the switch on Wi-Fi calling, making it available to customers with eligible plans that are running iOS 9. MacRumors has received tips from customers who were able to activate Wi-Fi calling and we were able to activate the feature on our own iPhones. A number of readers in our forums are also having success activating Wi-Fi calling. Wi-Fi calling is a feature that lets calls be placed over a wireless connection when cellular connectivity is poor, functioning much like an AT&T M-Cell does now. It's similar to Apple's own FaceTime Audio feature, which also routes calls over a Wi-Fi connection. AT&T customers can turn on Wi-Fi calling by going to the Phone section of the Settings app and toggling on the Wi-Fi calling feature. From there, there are a set of steps to walk through, including entering an emergency 911 address. Wi-Fi calling is available on the iPhone 6, 6s, 6 Plus, and 6s Plus running iOS 9. Customers who want to use Wi-Fi calling need to have AT&T HD voice features enabled, along with an Internet connection. Wi-Fi calling can be used for voice calls within the United States, Puerto Rico, and United States Virgin Islands at no charge. Long distance global voice calls will be charged standard long distance rates. Once the setup process is complete, customers are receiving notifications letting them know the Wi-Fi calling feature will be available after a short activation period. AT&T promised to launch Wi-Fi calling alongside iOS 9, but last week announced the feature was delayed due to its inability to get an FCC waiver that

AT&T Receives FCC Waiver Needed for Wi-Fi Calling, No Launch Date Yet

Earlier this week, AT&T announced that it had delayed its promised Wi-Fi calling feature as it had not been able to obtain an FCC waiver that would allow it to temporarily forgo offering support options for deaf and hard-of-hearing people. Following that announcement, the FCC has now granted AT&T's waiver request, allowing the carrier to proceed with its Wi-Fi calling launch plans. The waiver is available on the FCC website [PDF] and grants AT&T the right to delay implementing a teletypewriter (TTY) service for the deaf until December 31, 2017. AT&T plans to instead use a newer form of communication, real-time text (RTT) as an alternative, and the waiver will allow it to avoid using a TTY service until its RTT service is fully operational. In response to the FCC's waiver grant, AT&T Senior Executive Vice President of External and Legislative Affairs Jim Cicconi gave MacRumors the following statement:We're grateful the FCC has granted AT&T's waiver request so we can begin providing Wi-Fi calling. At the same time we are left scratching our heads as to why the FCC still seems intent on excusing the behavior of T-Mobile and Sprint, who have been offering these services without a waiver for quite some time. Instead of initiating enforcement action against them, or at least opening an investigation, the agency has effectively invited them to now apply for similar waivers and implied that their prior flaunting of FCC rules will be ignored. This is exactly what we meant when our letter spoke of concerns about asymmetric regulation."In its original statement on the waiver

AT&T Delays Wi-Fi Calling Support Amid Wait for FCC Waiver, Calls Out Sprint and T-Mobile

Originally tested in an iOS 9 public beta back in August, AT&T ultimately held back on a wide public release for Wi-Fi calling due to its decision to wait for an FCC waiver that would temporarily relieve the carrier of needing to offer support options for deaf and hard-of-hearing people. The Federal Communications Commission's rules state that all calling services need support for a teletypewriter (TTY) service for the deaf, but AT&T wants the old-fashioned TTY replaced with real-time text (RTT) support instead. Both TTY and RTT offer support for the deaf and hard-of-hearing to conduct non-voice conversations, but AT&T's RTT service wouldn't be ready until 2016, leading to the carrier's request for a temporary waiver from needing to implement TTY support until then. Yesterday, AT&T resubmitted its request for such a waiver to get its Wi-Fi calling service off the ground, simultaneously calling out Sprint and T-Mobile for deciding to move forward with similar services without supporting the FCC's rules (via Fierce Wireless). The company stated that the original launch date for Wi-Fi calling was set to be September 25, alongside the launch of the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus, but without the proper waiver from the Federal Communications Commission, the carrier decided to hold off on the launch of the service for now. "This past Friday, September 25, was the date on which AT&T intended to introduce Wi-Fi calling services in competition with other competitors in the market, namely T-Mobile and Sprint," AT&T wrote in its filing. "Those carriers have been offering Wi-Fi

Many AT&T iPhone Users Unable to Download Apps and Stream Music Over LTE

A growing number of AT&T subscribers on the MacRumors forums appear to be having issues downloading apps and streaming music over LTE, with some claiming AT&T is throttling App Store downloads and Apple Music content. When connected to Wi-Fi, users report that apps download normally, but over LTE, app downloads do not progress. Other users are reporting issues streaming content from the Apple Music app, with songs that start and then hang. As described by MacRumors reader Blizaine:I have three different iOS devices. Two are running iOS 9.0.1 and one is running iOS 8.4.1. When they are connected to wifi, apps download fine. When on LTE, the app just sits there and the progress bar does not move, even after a very long period of time. When I run a speed test over LTE, I'm getting a solid 10-15Mbps down (3-4 bars). Also, i have a VPN configured on one of the iOS 9.0.1 devices and when I enable the VPN over LTE, apps download fine. One of the devices also uses a different iTunes account. I supposed it could be a regional problem. I'm in Indianapolis Indiana, USA. I've tried toggling the Download over Cellular option off and on and I've reset the network settings on one device and even did a factory reset on another, with no success.Verizon and T-Mobile users do not appear to be experiencing any issues downloading content over LTE, suggesting the problem is limited to AT&T subscribers. Affected customers are using a range of iPhone and iPads, including the iPhone 4s, iPhone 6, iPhone 6s, and iPad Air 2. One MacRumors reader contacted AT&T's Advanced Tech Support line

AT&T Introduces New Mobile Share Value Plans With More Data

AT&T today announced that the carrier plans to introduce a couple of new Mobile Share Value Plans beginning tomorrow, further expanding data bucket options for its customers while simultaneously cutting the prices of a few existing data storage options. Customers will have new options like 2GB ($30) and 5GB ($50), but those who opt-in for a plan with 15GB or higher will get unlimited talk and text to Mexico and Canada. “There’s never been a better time to be an AT&T customer," said David Christopher, chief marketing officer, AT&T Mobility. “Tomorrow, we roll out new plans for everyone, including a plan that gives 50% more data than on our most popular plan. And we’re not done yet.” The announcement today sees the price of the 15GB plan cut from $130 to $100, alongside the 20GB plan getting reduced down from $150 to $140. The company notes that larger-size plans like 25GB, 30GB, 40GB and 50GB are also available, and business customers can get plans that go up to as much as 200GB. All of the plans being announced tomorrow cover the same benefits and options under AT&T Next, which allows users to pay for their phone in monthly installment plans of 12, 18, or 24 months. AT&T mentions briefly that "select locations" still provide two year contracts for $40 per line, but the company is in obvious motions to begin supporting subsidized contracts less and less as they pivot to a focus on Next's installment

AT&T WiFi Calling Now Available for Some iOS 9 Users

The most recent iOS 9 beta added WiFi calling options for AT&T subscribers, but when the beta was released last week, the feature was not functional. As of today, some users in the MacRumors forums who are running iOS 9 noticed a different message when attempting to activate the feature, and just hours later, WiFi calling began working for a limited number of AT&T subscribers. When attempting to activate WiFi calling in the Settings app, users who have access to the feature are receiving a welcome screen, a disclaimer, and a notice that WiFi calling has been activated and should be available within a few minutes. During the setup period, users are required to enter an address that emergency services will visit as a caller's location cannot be determined from a WiFi call. Following a short waiting period, WiFi calling becomes ready for use with the "Wi-Fi calling on This iPhone" option toggled on. While a few of our readers have had success getting the WiFi calling feature working, several other users do not have access, suggesting AT&T may be testing the feature in a limited number of areas ahead of launch. WiFi calling was first introduced with iOS 8, and shortly after the feature debuted, AT&T announced plans to support it. The company has not made any further announcements, but it is likely an official launch will come after iOS 9 is released to the public in September. An AT&T employee who is also a MacRumors reader says that his store has not received word on an upcoming launch, so official word on further availability of WiFi calling may still be a

AT&T Urges FCC to Drop $100 Million Fine, Says Data Throttling Doesn't Harm Customers

Last month the United States Federal Communications Commission announced that it would fine AT&T $100 million for misleading customers about its unlimited data plans and not adequately warning customers about throttling their data speeds. AT&T has since responded, arguing that data throttling doesn't harm customers, the company is being prejudged and that its First Amendment rights are being violated in a response first found by The Hill (via Ars Technica). The Commission’s findings that consumers and competition were harmed are devoid of factual support and wholly implausible. Its “moderate” forfeiture penalty of $100 million is plucked out of thin air, and the injunctive sanctions it proposes are beyond the Commission’s authority. Both, moreover, reflect an unseemly effort to coerce settlement. And the NAL and the related press campaign confirm that the agency has already prejudged AT&T’s liability, abandoning any pretext that the Commission remains an impartial arbiter of the case.AT&T, who wants the FCC to drop the fine, claims that it has made all the required disclosures to customers, pointing out that its Unlimited Data Plan customers were more likely to renew their contracts than non-Unlimited Data Plan customers. Additionally, the telecommunications company argued the FCC would be outside of its authority in both imposing the fine and making other requests because the statute of limitations on the case has passed. Lastly, AT&T argued that the FCC has no authority to order the company to inform its customers that it violated the Transparency Rule in not

AT&T Activation Fee for Contract Customers Rising to $45, New $15 Fee for 'Next' Customers

Beginning August 1, AT&T will raise its activation/upgrade fee for customers signing up for a one- or two-year contract, alongside introducing a specific activation fee for all AT&T Next and Bring-Your-Own-Phone customers. According to sources speaking with Droid Life, the new contract upgrade fee will increase from $40 to $45, while the activation cost for Next and BYOP customers will be $15. If true, AT&T will have the highest activation fee amongst its competitors. Other carriers, like Verizon, sit around a $40 upgrade fee cost currently. With the uptick in price for the carrier's contract activation charges, AT&T is changing its installment plan option, AT&T Next, from a no-cost-to-start service to requiring a $15 activation fee. The same $15 charge will be placed for customers interested in activating a new line of service with the BYOP program, which lets customers save money on their yearly contracts by bringing in a phone purchased elsewhere to avoid paying full-price. It appears that AT&T will grandfather in existing AT&T Next customers who have a plan with the company prior to August 1, and won't be charged the $15 fee on their next upgrade. However, the carrier noted that this policy is "subject to change," meaning existing Next customers may be facing the $15 charge sometime down the line of their upgrade cycle, if not immediately after the changes take

AT&T Fined $100 Million by FCC for Unlimited Data Throttling Practices

The United States Federal Communications Commission today announced plans to fine AT&T $100 million for misleading customers about its unlimited mobile data plans. Following an investigation, the FCC is accusing AT&T of severely slowing down the data speeds of customers with unlimited data plans and failing to adequately warn them about the slower data speeds.In 2011, AT&T implemented a "Maximum Bit Rate" policy and capped the maximum data speeds for unlimited customers after they used a set amount of data within a billing cycle. The capped speeds were much slower than the normal network speeds AT&T advertised and significantly impaired the ability of AT&T customers to access the Internet or use data applications for the remainder of the billing cycle.The FCC says AT&T violated the 2010 Open Internet Transparency Rule by falsely calling its plans "unlimited" and by not informing customers of the maximum speed they would receive under AT&T's Maximum Bit Rate policy. Millions of customers suffered slow data speeds, with some seeing speed reductions for 12 days per month on average. On the decision, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler had this to say: "Customers deserve to get what they pay for. Broadband providers must be upfront and transparent about the services they provide. The FCC will not stand idly by while consumers are deceived by misleading marketing materials and insufficient disclosure." AT&T ceased offering unlimited data plans years ago, but it continues to have customers with grandfathered unlimited data plans. AT&T previously throttled all of those customers after

Apple Store No Longer Sells iPhone With 2-Year Contract on AT&T

Apple overnight removed the option to purchase a new iPhone on a two-year contract with AT&T on the Apple Online Store, eliminating the ability for customers to purchase an iPhone for a subsidized price of $199 or $299 through the carrier. Apple now sells iPhones on AT&T exclusively through the AT&T Next carrier financing program, while two-year contracts remain available through Verizon and Sprint. AT&T Next allows a customer to purchase a new iPhone for $0 down and make equal payments for 12, 18 or 24 months until the full price of the smartphone has been paid, at which point the device can be traded in for a new iPhone. The full price breakdown for each iPhone model on AT&T Next, available through both the Apple Online Store and Apple Retail Store, is listed below. iPhone 6 - 16GB: From $21.64/month - 64GB: From $24.97/month - 128GB: From $28.30/month iPhone 6 Plus - 16GB: From $24.97/month - 64GB: From $28.30/month - 128GB: From $31.64/month The shift away from two-year contracts is not specific to Apple or iPhone, but rather part of a larger move by AT&T. Droid-Life reported last month that AT&T would begin moving away from two-year contracts on June 1, although the report claims that the option will remain available through AT&T's website, company-owned retail stores, local dealers via direct fulfillment and customer