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Apple iOS 8.0.1 Issues Linked to Maps Debacle, Same Manager Oversaw Both Projects

ios_8_iconApple's recent iOS 8.0.1 issue, which saw the update disable the cellular connection and Touch ID functionality on numerous iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices, may have links to Apple's 2012 Maps debacle, reports Bloomberg.

According to "people familiar with Apple's management structure," the same mid-level manager was in charge of overseeing quality assurance for both projects, having been moved to the iOS team after being removed from the Maps team.
[The manager] was removed from the maps team after the software gave users unreliable directions and mislabeled landmarks, though he remained in charge of testing for iOS, said one person, who asked not to be identified since the information isn't public.
The employee in question, who has worked at Apple since 2000, is in charge of a team of more than "100 people around the world" responsible for testing the software before it reaches consumers, says Bloomberg.

According to the Bloomberg report, engineers who test the new software often are unable to get the latest iPhones until they are available to customers, "resulting in updates that may not have gone through tests that are are rigorous as those for the latest handsets," and internal issues can also impact Apple's testing, which may explain how such a significant bug got through the testing process.
Internal turf battles also can impact quality testing, according to a former senior manager. Teams responsible for testing cellular and Wi-Fi connectivity will sometimes sign off on a product release, then [the manager's] team will discover later that it’s not compatible with another feature, the person said.
Released yesterday, iOS 8.0.1 contained a critical bug that caused the cellular service and Touch ID on iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices to malfunction. Though the update was pulled after approximately an hour and fifteen minutes after it was first released, numerous iPhone users were able to download the software, which effectively disabled their phones.

Apple announced that it was investigating the situation in the afternoon, and yesterday evening, the company released a support document saying iOS 8.0.2 was in the works and directing users to fix the problem via an iTunes restore to iOS 8.

Apple has seen several issues with iOS 8 in recent weeks, including a major bug with HealthKit that caused the company to pull all HealthKit-enabled apps from the App Store ahead of the public release of iOS 8. Apple promised a quick fix, and iOS 8.0.1 was supposed to repair the issue and allow apps that use HealthKit back into the App Store.

Apple has just released iOS 8.0.2 to fix the bugs that were introduced with iOS 8.0.1.

Update: This post has been updated to remove the individual's name.

Tag: iOS 8.0.1


Top Rated Comments

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24 months ago
This is pretty low for MacRumors. People make mistakes. You don't have to ruin their careers.
Rating: 66 Votes
24 months ago

sure. link directly to his linkedin and rub it in his face.


Seriously. I'm sure Macrumors won't be the only one, but why ruin this guys reputation/career in such a public way? He's human! Humans make mistakes! There's no way to even know if this actually one mans fault. How could he possibly test millions of phones being used in different ways?

People act like the guy is running the country. It's just a damn phone, give the guy a break! (I love my phone too, but come on)
Rating: 65 Votes
24 months ago
According to "people familiar with Apple's management structure,"

I hope MacRumors did their research to make sure this really was the guy responsible. Otherwise you just f'ed up his life badly.
Rating: 61 Votes
24 months ago
This makes me very uncomfortable. The fact that this guy's name was leaked to the media suggests that someone inside Apple has an axe to grind. This man is about to be convicted in the court of public opinion with no evidence to suggest he has done a thing wrong, other than perhaps be in wrong place twice.
Rating: 56 Votes
24 months ago
Wow, is MacRumors now supporting mobbing?
Rating: 51 Votes
24 months ago

According to "people familiar with Apple's management structure,"

I hope MacRumors did their research to make sure this really was the guy responsible. Otherwise you just f'ed up his life badly.


If I was MacRumors' senior editor, I would've passed on this report. But I guess the ad revenue is too irresistable.
Rating: 51 Votes
24 months ago
I don't agree with posting this guy's name on a rumor by an unnamed source (probably a co-worker(s) that wants a B Team player gone).

A ****** thing to do doesn't even start to cover this.
Rating: 45 Votes
24 months ago
Directly linking to his LinkedIn profile is pretty unnecessary.
Rating: 40 Votes
24 months ago
sure. link directly to his linkedin and rub it in his face.
Rating: 37 Votes
24 months ago
You really can attribute all of this to one guy? It's not like he coded this stuff by himself.
Rating: 36 Votes

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