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'Spotify' How Tos

How to Move Your Playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

We've been experimenting with Apple Music for over a month now, but there are still a few important questions that pop up with the new music streaming service, the first being "How can I import my playlists from Spotify?" The short answer is that you can't without using third-party software. After much research, we've found there are two fairly reliable third-party services that work well. One is called STAMP, and the other is called Move to Apple Music. Both automatically search for and add tracks from Spotify to Apple Music so you don't have to manually go through your entire collection song-by-song. While the end result is pretty much the same, each app offers different features. Before you get started, make sure you are logged into iTunes with your Apple ID and subscribed to Apple Music. With both STAMP and Move to Apple Music, you can download the program from each company's website. Both apps must be given special permission to control your computer.

'Spotify' Articles

Spotify App Accused of Thrashing Storage Drives With Excessive Data Writes

Spotify's desktop music streaming app has been accused of putting an unnecessary burden on users' machines by continuously writing massive amounts of data to local storage, even when the app is idle. Over the last five months, multiple users have posted about the problem in Spotify's official support forum, as well as on Reddit, Hacker News, and elsewhere. Users claim the Spotify app has been writing inordinate amounts of data to their drives while running in the background, in some cases writing up to 10GB every 40 seconds. Reports of tens or hundreds of gigabytes of data being written in an hour have become commonplace, said ArsTechnica, which was able to replicate the problem on Macs running the current version of the Spotify app. The data writes appear to occur regardless of whether songs are set to be stored locally or if music is actually being played, potentially significantly reducing the life of users' storage drives - particularly SSD devices, which have a finite amount of write capacity. "This is a *major* bug that currently affects thousands of users," Spotify user Paul Miller told Ars. "If for example, Castrol Oil lowered your engine's life expectancy by five to 10 years, I imagine most users would want to know, and that fact *should* be reported on."Spotify eventually responded to ArsTechnica's requests for comment and said "any potential concerns have now been addressed" in version 1.0.42 of the app, which is in the process of being rolled out, but which reportedly remains unavailable to many users. According to some reports, the data writes are

Spotify App Not Coming to Apple TV 'Anytime Soon'

A conversation thread on Github between a few developers and Spotify project leader Samuel Erdtman has confirmed that the streaming music company isn't looking into developing an app for Apple's fourth-generation Apple TV "anytime soon" (via AppAdvice). In the thread, which began as a feature request for the Spotify SDK to support tvOS, Erdtman eventually closed out the comments saying that building support for Spotify on Apple TV has been "down prioritized." That might not be an official confirmation that Spotify will never arrive on Apple's set-top box, but Erdtman's wording hints that it's far from Spotify's top priority at the moment. To support tvOS has been down prioritized, You should not expect a release supporting it any time soon. I'm sorry about that. Although Spotify users might like to take advantage of a tvOS app for Spotify, it's not entirely surprising that the two companies may never reach an agreement on how such an experience would work. Over the summer, Spotify and Apple quarreled over the 30 percent cut that Apple now takes from iOS App Store subscriptions, which has caused Spotify to charge $12.99 for subscriptions purchased through the App Store, a $3 premium over subscriptions purchased on the web and $3 more than the price of Apple Music. Spotify claimed Apple was using such a tactic as a "weapon to harm competitors," while Apple accused Spotify of "resorting to rumors and half-truths" to gain public opinion in its favor. Apple's new music royalty proposal for streaming services also adversely affects the free tiers of companies like

Spotify Free Desktop Users Facing Malware-Filled Ads on Mac and Windows

A few reports coming in over the past day describe occurances where Spotify's free streaming service on desktop computers is pushing malware-filled advertisements to users without their input. According to a user posting on Spotify Community, the malware causes ads to launch "and keep on launching" the computer's default browser to different sites lined with viruses (via The Next Web). Multiple macOS and Safari users have confirmed the issue to be happening on Apple systems. There's something pretty alarming going on right now with Spotify Free. This started a several hours ago. If you have Spotify Free open, it will launch - and keep on launching - the default internet browser on the computer to different kinds of malware / virus sites. Some of them do not even require user action to be able to cause harm. I have 3 different systems (computers) which are all clean and they are all doing this, all via Spotify - I am thinking it's the Ads in Spotify Free. I hope this has been noticed and Spotify staff are fixing it - fast. But it's still puzzling something like this can actually happen. It's not clear yet what's causing the issue, but multiple confirmations of its connection with Spotify Free have surfaced on Twitter, with users reporting that malware ads have appeared on both Mac and Windows platforms. Spotify has responded to a few users on Twitter and appears to be looking into the issue, but has yet to make an official announcement. One Mac user was running OS X El Capitan 10.11.6 on a mid-2014 MacBook Pro when the ads in Safari began popping up. PSA:

Spotify Launches in Japan, the Largest Music Market Outside the U.S.

Spotify launched in Japan today, 18 months after it opened its first offices in the country (via TechCrunch). The streaming service has been in protracted negotiations with record labels to flesh out rights for the region, allowing rivals like Apple Music to get a head start in the country's hugely lucrative market. Music sales in Japan are estimated to be almost $3 billion a year, making it the second largest market outside of the U.S. One potential obstacle for streaming services is that people in Japan prefer to buy and own music on CD rather than purchase digital files, although the convenience of streaming could sway consumers and allow services like Spotify to build a significant subscriber base in the country. Spotify also becomes the only mainstream streaming service in Japan that offers a free-tier option for users, which may have been a factor in its protracted negotiations with the music industry, but could serve to persuade Japanese consumers to give streaming a try over competitors. Back in March, Spotify launched in Indonesia, the company's first big expansion in Asia for some time. It first entered the continent in 2013 with launches in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaysia, but had been relatively quiet in the region since. Spotify has 40 million paying customers compared to Apple Music's 17 million paying customers. Yesterday it was reported that Spotify is in 'advanced talks' to purchase SoundCloud, which has upwards of 175 million listeners per month and could provide a huge influx of users to the service, giving it an edge over

Spotify in 'Advanced Talks' to Purchase SoundCloud

Streaming music service and Apple Music rival Spotify is in "advanced talks" to acquire audio distribution platform SoundCloud, reports Financial Times. Little information is available on the terms of the potential deal at this time. SoundCloud, which allows users to upload, promote, and share audio recordings ranging from music to podcasts, has upwards of 175 million total listeners a month, which could bring a huge influx of customers to Spotify and give it an edge over Apple. Spotify has 40 million paying subscribers compared to Apple Music's 17 million paying subscribers, but Apple Music's numbers have been growing steadily since its 2015 launch. Apple Music is also backed by the strength of Apple's subscriber base, which dwarfs that of most other music services and gives the company a huge pool of potential future subscribers. As competition heats up between Spotify and Apple Music, the two have become bitter rivals and have been involved in some public battles over issues like exclusivity, the App Store, and free listening tiers in recent months. SoundCloud recently introduced a new subscription service designed to compete with Spotify, Apple Music, Pandora, and other music streaming options. SoundCloud Go, priced at $9.99, gives users on-demand ad-free access to 125 million tracks, including premium licensed content. With a SoundCloud acquisition, Spotify could potentially add all of that user-created content to its own music catalog, giving customers more original content to listen to along with its existing licensed

Spotify Launches Infinite 'Daily Mix' Playlists Showcasing New and Old Music

Spotify has announced the launch of "Daily Mix," a new intelligent playlist system -- in the vein of Discover Weekly and Release Radar -- that puts together a "near endless" collection of songs for users every day (via The Verge). The songs include a mix of music and artists they have listened to previously, as well as new music based off their interests. When Daily Mix is updated each day, Spotify will introduce "between one and six mixes" to each user, mostly depending on how broad their music tastes are. Each mix avoids specific labels and instead opts for visual album clues as to what's inside of each, with four album covers providing context of the songs within each playlist. Matt Ogle, leader of music discovery and personalization at Spotify, said "we found that the mixes were much better received when we leaned back and let people describe them themselves." Image via The Verge It uses the same basic approach as Discover Weekly, selecting songs based on your listening habits. "But that’s where the similarities end," said Matt Ogle, who helps lead development of music discovery and personalization at Spotify. "In a lot of ways it's the opposite of Discover Weekly." Instead of trying to take the work out of finding music that's new to you, "Daily Mix is trying to take the work out of hitting a button and always hearing music that you love." Instead of the refresh that Discover Weekly and Release Radar get each Monday and Friday, respectively, users might notice that Daily Mixes are much more subtly altered. Songs within playlists might be added or removed,

Spotify Reaches Over 40 Million Paying Subscribers, Continues to Outpace Apple Music

Spotify has announced that it now has over 40 million paying subscribers as of this month, meaning that it has added some 10 million subscribers since March. Spotify remains the most popular streaming music service worldwide, and its new subscriber growth continues to outpace its biggest rival, Apple Music. Spotify founder and CEO Daniel Ek hinted about the milestone in a tweet earlier today: 40 is the new 30.Million. 😄— Daniel Ek (@eldsjal) September 14, 2016 Apple Music has been growing at a pace of about 2 million new subscribers every two months: 11 million in February, 13 million in April, 15 million in June, and 17 million in early September. Spotify's figures, meanwhile, show it grew at a pace of over 3 million new subscribers every two months between March and September. Earlier this year, Spotify vice president Jonathan Forster said Apple Music is "raising the profile of streaming," which has helped, not hurt, its business."It's great that Apple is in the game. They are definitely raising the profile of streaming. It is hard to build an industry on your own," said Forster. "Since Apple Music started we've been growing quicker and adding more users than before."Spotify may benefit from Apple, but its relationship with the iPhone maker is not perfect. The two companies were recently embroiled in a major dispute after Apple rejected a version of the Spotify app that replaced the option to purchase a subscription via in-app purchase with an external sign-up function. At the time, Spotify accused Apple of using the App Store approval process as a "weapon

Apple's Deep Pockets Affecting Spotify Contract Renewals

Several of Spotify's contracts are up for renewal and the high rates Apple pays record labels are affecting Spotify's negotiations, reports MusicBusinessWorldwide. As it considers a future IPO, Spotify is aiming to strike long-term deals with record labels at lower rates, while labels want Spotify to pay as much as Apple does. Spotify reportedly pays record labels 55 percent of its revenue, while Apple Music pays 58 percent (Apple is also said to pay more to publishers than Spotify does). Spotify was initially given a "marketing discount," but now record labels want Spotify to pay what Apple pays. Meanwhile, Spotify, in an effort to become profitable, wants to pay less.The major labels, unimpressed with some of Spotify's recent spending decisions, believe that now's the time to up this figure. So where do they want to take it? Well, it's common knowledge that Apple Music is paying 58% of revenue to labels - after users' free trial periods have finished. The majors want Spotify to move its revenue share up towards that point. Loss-making Spotify, though, is attempting to push this revenue share down, say MBW's sources. Yup: that means paying labels and artists a smaller slice of the proceeds.Spotify is arguing that Apple's revenue share rate only applies after a three-month free trial and that it simply doesn't have the spending power of Apple, Google, or Amazon, three of its main competitors all with deep pockets, large user bases, and other sources of revenue. Negotiations remain "optimistic" according to MBW's sources, and the "likely outcome" is a licensing

Spotify Debuts 'Release Radar' to Suggest New Music Based on Favorite Artists

Spotify today announced a new curated music section of its popular streaming platform, called Release Radar, that will automatically update every Friday with new music from artists already in each user's library. The company said that the section will help its listeners stay "on top of the latest singles by your favorite artists," without having to manually search for new music. The new Release Radar -- which will be found in the New Releases for You section within Discover -- will gather up to two full hours "of the newest drops from the artists you follow and listen to the most," as well as introducing its listeners to new music after intelligently analyzing listening habits. The new update is a version of Spotify's existing feature Discover Weekly, which gives users music suggestions of entirely new artists and singles every Monday, instead of ones they already have been exposed to. “With the huge amount of new music released every week, it can be difficult to keep up with the latest tracks,” says Matt Ogle, Senior Product Owner at Spotify. “With Release Radar, we wanted to create the simplest way for you to find all the newly released music that matters the most to you, in one playlist.” Most streaming services have been giving users similar features over the past few years, including Apple Music's "For You" tab, which accumulates recommendations based on a liking system coupled with each user's most listened-to music. Instead of one giant playlist like Release Radar and Discover Weekly in Spotify, Apple Music populates the For You section with custom-created

Apple's New Music Royalty Proposal Would Make Streaming Costlier for Free Services Like Spotify

Apple has submitted a proposal to the U.S. Copyright Royalty Board calling for a simplified way to pay songwriters and music publishers for streaming music, according to Billboard. While the change would benefit labels, artists and publishers, it would make it more difficult for streaming services like Spotify to continue offering free tiers. Apple, which has always had a gift for creative simplicity, wants to make this process easier and more transparent, according to a copy of the filing obtained by Billboard. The company’s proposal to the Copyright Royalty Board suggests a simple, “all-in” statutory rate that would be “fair, simple and transparent, unlike the incredibly complicated structure that currently exists.”Apple's suggested rate is 9.1 cents per 100 plays, which would make the songwriting royalties for 100 streams equal to the royalties for a single song download. However, the change would make it more expensive for companies like Spotify and YouTube to offer free music tiers. The current system sees streaming companies paying songwriters and publishers between 10.5 and 12 percent of their revenue using what Billboard terms a "complicated formula." The money is then divided into public performance and mechanical royalties, which is then paid to publishers and "collected societies." Currently, Apple and other streaming music providers don't have to pay publishers the statutory rate set by the Royalty Board because they can negotiate their own deals. However, negotiations between publishers and streaming services would start at a different place should

Apple Accuses Spotify of 'Resorting to Rumors and Half-Truths', Sets Record Straight on App Rejection

Yesterday, Spotify accused Apple of using its App Store approval process as a "weapon to harm competitors" after Apple rejected a Spotify app update, and now Apple has responded to Spotify's accusations to "set the record straight." In a letter to Spotify lawyer Horacio Gutierrez that was shared by BuzzFeed, Apple's legal head Bruce Sewell says Apple is disappointed with the public attacks and concerned that Spotify is asking for exemptions to rules that apply to all app developers. There can be no doubt that Spotify has benefited enormously from its association with Apple's App Store. Since joining the App Store in 2009, Apple's platform has provided you with over 160 million downloads of your app, resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in incremental revenue to Spotify. That's why we find it troubling that you are asking for exemptions to the rules we apply to all developers and are publicly resorting to rumors and half-truths about our service. Our guidelines help competition, not hurt it. The fact that we compete has never influenced how Apple treats Spotify or other successful competitors like Google Play Music, Tidal, Amazon Music, Pandora or the numerous other apps on the App Store that distribute digital music.Sewell goes on to say that Spotify's belief it should not have to pay to take advantage of the "benefits of Apple's hard work" is "simply unfair and unreasonable," pointing out that the App Store rules existed long before Apple Music was introduced. He also points out the new revenue split rules for subscriptions, which will see Apple taking a

Spotify Accuses Apple of Using App Store Approval Process as a 'Weapon to Harm Competitors'

Spotify and Apple are embroiled in a major dispute, which Spotify is today taking to the court of public opinion. Spotify submitted a new version of its app to the App Store, following a decision to eliminate the option to purchase a subscription through Apple, and Apple has rejected the update. In response, Spotify wrote a letter to Apple's legal team on June 26, portions of which have been shared by Recode. Spotify's letter, which it shared yesterday with Congressional staff in Washington, D.C., accuses Apple of causing "grave harm" to Spotify by rejecting the app update. The details on the rejection are somewhat murky, but Spotify claims Apple denied the app update and demanded Spotify use Apple's billing system if it "wants to use the app to acquire new customers and sell subscriptions." Spotify was using its iOS app to highlight a promotion offering new Spotify customers three months of service for $0.99, something Apple didn't like. Apple reportedly forced Spotify to stop advertising the promotion in the iOS app or face the removal of the app from the App Store. Spotify stopped the advertisements, but also decided to stop offering App Store subscription options, a move that's led to the current disagreement between the two companies."This latest episode raises serious concerns under both US and EU competition law," Gutierrez wrote. "It continues a troubling pattern of behavior by Apple to exclude and diminish the competitiveness of Spotify on iOS and as a rival to Apple Music, particularly when seen against the backdrop of Apple's previous anticompetitive

Senator Elizabeth Warren Accuses Apple of Trying to 'Snuff Out Competition,' Spotify Agrees

Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren today gave a speech where she accused Amazon, Apple, and Google of attempting to "snuff out competition" by locking out smaller companies, reports Recode."Google, Apple and Amazon have created disruptive technologies that changed the world, and ... they deserve to be highly profitable and successful," Warren said. "But the opportunity to compete must remain open for new entrants and smaller competitors that want their chance to change the world again."In regard to Apple specifically, Warren said the company has made it difficult for its rivals to offer competitive streaming services able to compete with Apple Music, presumably through the cut that it takes from streaming services like Spotify when people sign up through the iOS app. To account for Apple's cut, Spotify charges $12.99 to customers who purchase a subscription through an Apple device, which is $3 higher than the $9.99 price tag of Apple Music. While Apple declined to comment on Warren's statements, Spotify's head of communications and public policy Jonathan Prince took the opportunity to lambaste Apple in a statement given to Recode. "Apple has long used its control of iOS to squash competition in music, driving up the prices of its competitors, inappropriately forbidding us from telling our customers about lower prices, and giving itself unfair advantages across its platform through everything from the lock screen to Siri. You know there's something wrong when Apple makes more off a Spotify subscription than it does off an Apple Music subscription and doesn't

Spotify Has Twice as Many Paid Subscribers as Apple Music

Spotify confirmed to The Telegraph today that it now has more than 100 million monthly active users worldwide, including approximately 30 million monthly paying subscribers. Comparatively, Apple services chief Eddy Cue announced at WWDC 2016 last week that Apple Music has 15 million paying subscribers, just two weeks before the streaming music service turns one year old. Apple Music was at 13 million subscribers in April and 11 million subscribers in February, meaning that it has been growing at a rate of about 2 million subscribers every two months. Spotify, which launched in Europe in October 2008 and expanded to the U.S. in July 2011, thereby remains the world's most popular streaming service, but Apple Music is quickly closing the gap. Both services cost $9.99 per month for individuals and $14.99 per month for families, while only Spotify offers a free ad-supported tier. Nevertheless, Spotify recently said that Apple Music has helped, not hurt, its business. Since Apple Music launched on June 30, 2015, its European rival has grown at a faster pace than beforehand. Spotify has now surpassed Skype as the most lucrative European startup, with an estimated valuation of roughly $8.5 billion."It's great that Apple is in the game. They are definitely raising the profile of streaming. It is hard to build an industry on your own," Jonathan Forster, a vice president and one of its first employees, told Reuters in an interview. "Since Apple Music started we've been growing quicker and adding more users than before."Despite rising users and revenues, Spotify continues

Spotify Says App Store Changes Don't 'Get to the Core of the Problem'

After Apple announced a handful of new changes heading to the App Store under Phil Schiller's reign -- including a new revenue split for subscriptions and ads in search results -- Spotify recently commented its opinion on the announcements. Speaking with The Verge, Jonathan Prince, Spotify's head of corporate communications and global policy, said simply, "It's a nice gesture, but doesn't get to the core of the problem." One of Spotify's major hangups centers around the fact that the new rules still prohibit apps from offering "special offers or discounts," because price flexibility is prohibited. The Cupertino company's policy makes sure that it's a constant presence between the customer and developer, "which means developers will continue to lack visibility into why customers churn." "Unless Apple changes its rules, price flexibility is prohibited, which is why we can never provide special offers or discounts, and means we won't have the ability to share any savings with our customers," Prince continued. "Apple still insists on inserting itself between developers and their customers, which means developers will continue to lack visibility into why customers churn — or who even qualifies as a long-term subscriber." Prince also said that the rules make it hard to even determine which customers could be considered as a long-term subscriber - an important factor to take into account now that Apple will take only a 15 percent cut if a user stays subscribed to a service for more than a year. Apple currently takes 30 percent of a subscription fee when users sign up to a

Spotify Matches Apple Music $14.99 Per Month Family Plan

Spotify has upgraded its family plan to directly match Apple Music's offering, with up to six Premium accounts per family now available for $14.99 a month (via The Verge). Spotify says users under the family plan will receive their own separate premium accounts and have full access to Spotify's library of songs and videos. Existing subscribers meanwhile will automatically be upgraded to the new plan and should receive a lower bill in the next month. The plan rolls out globally today, except for users of the music streaming service residing in Canada. The move follows in the footsteps of Google Play, which matched Apple Music's family plan in December. Earlier this month Spotify claimed it had experienced a faster pace of growth since the launch of Apple Music, reaching 30 million paying subscribers compared to the 20 million it had when the rival service launched last June. In April, Apple claimed 13 million subscribers, up from 11 million users in February. At the beginning of May, Apple introduced a 50% discount for all student subscribers to Apple Music, offering those eligible a $4.99 per month deal. Apple Music is widely expected to see a design overhaul in time for WWDC this year, due to be held June 13–17 in

T-Mobile Expands 'Binge On' Free Video Streaming to NBC, Spotify, and More

T-Mobile announced today that its free unlimited video streaming program Binge On now supports an additional 13 services, headlined by NBC and video content from existing Music Freedom partners Google Play Music, Radio Disney, Spotify, and TIDAL. The other additions include Great Big Story, Kiswe, Ligonier Ministries, NOGGIN, Qello Concerts, Univision, Univision Noticias, and Toon Goggles. Binge On now supports over 80 video services in the United States. Binge On is a free incentive that enables T-Mobile customers on a qualifying Simple Choice plan to stream unlimited 480p video from dozens of partnered services, including Netflix, HBO NOW, Hulu, and YouTube, without any of the data consumed counting towards their plans. T-Mobile added 16 new Binge On and Music Freedom partners in

Spotify Growing at Faster Pace Since Apple Music Launched Last Year

Despite the launch of Apple Music, which recently reached 13 million paid subscribers, rival service Spotify told Reuters that it has experienced a faster pace of growth since last June than beforehand."It's great that Apple is in the game. They are definitely raising the profile of streaming. It is hard to build an industry on your own," Jonathan Forster, a vice president and one of its first employees, told Reuters in an interview. "Since Apple Music started we've been growing quicker and adding more users than before."Spotify recently announced that it has 30 million paying customers, compared to around 20 million paid subscribers last June, while its total active user base has grown to nearly 100 million from 75 million a year ago. Apple has not recently disclosed how many users it has on a three-month trial for an overall comparison, but Spotify remains over 2x to 2.5x larger than Apple Music in terms of paid subscribers worldwide."It would be terrible if we were just taking each other's users or to learn there was just a ceiling of 100 million users - I don't think that is the case," said Forster, who had just returned to Stockholm from the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in California.Apple Music has inevitably generated increased awareness of the concept of streaming music, which in turn has helped Spotify triple its paid subscriber base in just two years. The service, which launched in Europe in October 2008 and expanded to the U.S. in July 2011, had 10 million subscribers through May 2014. Spotify continues to operate at a loss due to expensive

Spotify Announces 12 Original Shows Launching Before the End of 2016

Spotify today announced 12 new original series coming to the music streaming platform this summer and fall, which the company hopes will keep its users drawn into the service more often (via Bloomberg). The shows will surround music and pop culture in general and be "centered around three main themes – music performances, music profiles and music culture," with episodes lasting up to fifteen minutes each. The new video offerings come about a year after Spotify began showcasing clips from Comedy Central, ESPN, and MTV within the app. Now the company intends to get into the original programming game, with new shows like Landmark, a documentary series detailing important moments in music history, and Rush Hour, which will force two artists to quickly collaborate on a setlist of songs that they must then perform live. The company has even netted a few well-known actors and producers for some of the shows, like Tim Robbins, who will produce a "mockumentary series about a competition to become the next dance music phenom." This first phase of 12 shows will be focused on music, and Spotify intends to speak with artists to figure out ways it can incorporate the video initiative into upcoming album launches. Tom Calderone, the company’s content partnerships chief, said that the second phase of programming is already planned, as well, focusing on animated and comedic series "tailored to the service’s young audience." Calderone mentioned that one of the biggest hurdles the company must face is educating its users about the shows, and somehow promoting each series

Spotify Replaces Hamburger Menu With Navigation Bar on iPhone

As a few users have noticed over the past day, Spotify has begun rolling out a small but significant design change to its iOS app that does away with the hamburger menu and replaces it with an easier-to-understand navigation bar across the bottom of the experience. The new bar more closely resembles the rest of the apps in Apple's ecosystem, particularly the navigation menu on its own streaming music service, Apple Music, which is now rumored for a design overhaul announcement at WWDC. Before the update, Spotify users had to tap on the three-line hamburger button in the top-left corner of the app to open up a launch pad menu that would bring them to other sections of the service like its radio and music library. Hiding much-needed areas of Spotify from the immediate view of its users made it somewhat of a hassle, especially for newcomers, so the introduction of the straightforward traversal cues presented by the navigation bar should help everyone out. Specifically, the new bar houses tabs for Spotify's Home launching pad, an area to browse new music, a search function, access to radio, and your own library of music. Understandably, some in-house testing by Spotify discovered that with the tab bar, user interactivity with these menu options jumped up 30 percent over the hamburger UI, while also encouraging new music and artist discovery and keeping users inside the service instead of seeking alternative solutions in other music streaming apps. iPhone users in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, and Sweden will begin seeing the navigation bar