Lory Gil

Lory loves all things tech-related and doesn't care about being made fun of for being the first on the block with the newest gadget. Plays in a band. Is a board game hoarder. Has a 20 pound cat.



How to Use the App Store on Apple TV

The fourth-generation Apple TV has a lot of new features, one of them being the addition of the Apple TV App Store. On the surface, the App Store on Apple TV seems similar to that of the iOS or OS X version. There are, however, some aspects of the tvOS App Store that are are a little different and might need some explaining. For example, some apps, like Lumino City, are available on iOS and Apple TV, while others such as Beat Sports are only available on Apple TV, and can therefore be a little harder to find. Apple has gradually been adding features such as categories to the Apple TV App Store, so things are definitely still a work in progress. We've got a few tips on how to navigate the App Store, and maybe even discover new apps worth downloading. App Discovery Probably the most frustrating aspect of the Apple TV App Store is finding cool new content. Since the Apple TV's debuted, Apple has added Top Charts and Categories, which have greatly improved our ability to discover content. Top Charts shows the top 50 – 75 (or so) paid, free, and grossing apps. Currently there is no way to filter the lists by category. However, with more content being added daily, it is likely that Apple will at some point add category filter options so we can search for, say, Top Paid Games or Top Free Entertainment apps. When you visit the Categories section, you'll be able to select from a few major classifications, like Games, Education, Entertainment, Sports, and more. Within a category, you'll see a list of spotlighted apps, like "What to Play" or "What to Watch," plus a

How to Customize Apple's Magic Mouse

While the Magic Mouse has been around for quite some time, Apple recently updated the accessory with an integrated rechargeable battery and other changes, so some MacRumors readers deciding to give the device a try may be new to it. If you're coming from a more traditional mouse, you should know there's a lot the Magic Mouse can do that might not be obvious. Rather than merely serving as a point and click device, the Magic Mouse and Magic Mouse 2 use swiping and tapping gestures along with the traditional clicks. Because the Magic Mouse incorporates taps and swipes, some of its features may be hidden or confusing to someone that's never used one before. We've created this quick how-to guide for readers who are new to the Magic Mouse, covering the ins and outs of the device to help you get the most out of it. First off, we want to note that tapping is not the same as clicking. The latter, as with traditional mouse buttons, requires that you press on the mouse until you hear a clicking noise or feel a clicking action. Tapping is not a common feature on a traditional mouse, but is one of Apple's Magic Mouse specialties. When you tap on the mouse lightly, as if you were tapping on your iPhone screen, you are triggering a different action than clicking. The Magic Mouse supports tapping or double tapping with one finger and tapping or double tapping with two fingers, all of which trigger different actions, depending on what you have enabled.

How to Get the Most Out of Sharing on Apple TV 4

The newest version of Apple's set-top box has a lot of features that were not available in previous models, and while some things are fairly easy to figure out, other features are somewhat hidden and harder to find. One great feature Apple has included with its fourth-generation Apple TV is a new App Store and the ability to have multiple accounts connected to the set-top box. Some sharing features connect automatically, but others take more work. We've got a guide for setting up various account and device sharing options so you can access the most content in the easiest way possible on the new Apple TV. Home Sharing With Home Sharing enabled, you can access your movies, music, TV shows, audiobooks, and more stored on a Mac or PC from any device that has the feature turned on and is on the same local network. If you haven't already turned on Home Sharing from your various Mac, PC, and iOS devices, here's how. PC or Mac On Mac, open iTunes and select File from the Menu Bar in the upper left corner of the screen. On PC, press the Alt key to access the menu bar and select File from the list. Click Home Sharing and choose "Turn on Home Sharing." Enter your Apple ID and password, and then click Turn on Home Sharing. iOS Open the Settings app and select Videos or Music. Tap Home Sharing. Enter your Apple ID and password and tap Sign In. Apple TV 4 Open the Settings app and click Accounts. Select Home Sharing. Enter your Apple ID and password and click Sign In. To access content from your computers, open the Computers app on Apple TV.

How to Use Live Photos on iPhone 6s and 6s Plus

Apple's latest flagship handsets, the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, are the first to include the ability to take Live Photos. A Live Photo is a combination of up to a three-second .mov file and a still .jpg file that is taken automatically when you press the shutter button in your iPhone 6s or 6s Plus camera app. It grabs up to 1.5 seconds of 960x720 video before and 1.5 seconds of video after you tap the shutter button. The camera app on the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus automatically starts recording the moment you open the app. Then, after you tap the shutter button, it saves only that 1.5 seconds beforehand and discards the rest. That means, if you open your camera app and leave it open for a few minutes, your iPhone will be recording video the whole time. However, once you tap that shutter button, everything recorded prior to 1.5 seconds beforehand will be deleted. To help you get the most of Live Photos, we've put together this guide for how to get the best Live Photos, and what to do with them afterward. How to Take a Live Photo Most iPhone 6s and 6s Plus devices have Live Photos on by default. However, there have been cases where the feature is off. Open the Camera app on your iPhone. Tap the Live Photos icon in the center-top of the screen between HDR and the timer. It looks like a set of concentric circles. You will know when Live Photos is on when the icon is highlighted in yellow. The word "Live" will also appear at the top of the screen. This label will remain on until 1.5 seconds after you tap the shutter button. It signifies that the video

How to Install Windows 10 on Your Mac Using Boot Camp Assistant

Following the launch of Windows 10, Apple updated Boot Camp to support the latest Windows operating system on select Mac computers from 2012 and newer. If you've always wanted to try Windows on your Mac and think that now is the time to finally take the plunge, we can help you get through the basics with our how-to guide for installing Windows 10 on your Mac using Apple's Boot Camp Assistant. This guide assumes you are installing Windows on your computer for the first time. What You Need You will, of course, need Windows 10, which can be purchased from Microsoft for $119. Older Mac computers support older versions of Windows, but won't work with Windows 10. Make sure to check the system requirements for the version of Windows you want to install to ensure your Mac meets or exceeds them. You can find out the system specs for your Mac using System Information, accessible by typing "System Information" into a Spotlight search or using the Apple menu to go to About This Mac --> System Report. To install Windows 10 (or Windows 7 or 8 for that matter) you will need at least 30 GB of free space on your startup drive and you'll need a keyboard and a mouse or trackpad to use with your computer. If you're running OS X El Capitan and have an 11- or 13-inch MacBook Air, a 13- or 15-inch MacBook Pro or the Mac Pro, there's no need for a USB drive. If you're running a different version of OS X or have an older Mac, you'll need a 16 GB flash drive that doesn't have anything you don't want erased on it (Boot Camp Assistant automatically reformats the flash drive).

How to Use 3D Touch on iPhone 6s and 6s Plus

Apple's iPhone 6s and 6s Plus has been selling strongly since its launch last month, thanks in part to a number of new features including 3D Touch. With it, users can access Quick Actions from the home screen and Peek and Pop from within a variety of stock and third-party apps. If you're wondering about what all of the hubbub is about, or want to know how to make it work better for you, we've put together this handy guide for 3D Touch. If you are still trying to decide whether to upgrade to the iPhone 6s model, why not stop into an Apple Retail store and test out 3D Touch (along with the device's other great features) for yourself on one of the many demo units. Quick Actions You can only use Quick Actions on an app's icon, and it works as shortcut to specific features within the app. For example, the Pinterest app includes direct access to trending pins, the search function, and board creation. Instagram's Quick Action lets you create a new post, view your activity, search, or send a direct message. To trigger Quick Actions, give a firm press on an app's icon. When the menu appears, drag your finger to the shortcut you would like to use. The app will open directly to that feature. If you don't press hard enough to pop up the shortcuts and feel a bit of haptic feedback, your phone will instead register a long press that allows you to enter the familiar mode where you can rearrange and delete apps on the home screen.

How to Use Split View in OS X El Capitan

With the recent release of OS X El Capitan, Mac users can now take advantage of full-screen apps in a split screen view. That is, a compatible app will zoom to take up an entire half of the screen and you can do the same with a second one, giving you two apps side-by-side in full-screen mode. While the basics of Split View are simple, there are a few aspects you might want to get familiar with to make the most productive use of the feature. To activate Split View, click and hold on the green expand button in the upper left corner of a compatible app's window. While you are holding down the button, one side of the screen will be shaded in blue. Release the button and the app will automatically format to fit half of the screen. At the same time, any compatible apps that are open will automatically shift to the opposite side of the screen. Any apps that are not compatible will shrink down into the lower right corner of the screen. If you try to access them, you will receive a notification that the app isn't available in Split View mode.

How to Customize Default Replies on Apple Watch

With watchOS 2, Apple added some features to the Mail app that make it possible for you to actually respond to email right from Apple Watch. Similar to responding to text messages on Apple Watch, users can now use voice dictation, send an emoji, or respond with a preset default reply. Additionally, Facebook recently updated its Messenger app to work on Apple Watch. So, now you can read and reply to chats with Facebook contacts. Apple provides room for about 20 default replies for Messages and about a dozen for Mail. Facebook provides six. You are not confined to the premade responses, however, and you can customize them to say whatever you'd like. We've got a quick tutorial explaining how to customize your quick responses to fit your personality. The steps are very similar for customizing default responses in all three apps. Messages On iPhone, open the Apple Watch app and navigate to the My Watch tab. Select Messages from the menu. Tap "Default Replies." Tap a premade response and replace it with your own.

How to Personalize Your Watch Face and Complications in watchOS 2

watchOS 2, the first major update to the Apple Watch's operating system, was released in September, just five months after the device's debut. If you didn't face any download issues getting watchOS 2 on your Apple Watch, you are well on your way towards looking for the new features the update brings. One major change we'd been anticipating for months is the ability to personalize watch faces with the photos we've taken, and third-party complications are another fantastic addition that will add more variety and more functionality to the look of the Apple Watch. A third addition, time-lapse video watch faces, is sure to wow your friends and will give you some dynamic scenery to look at each time you raise your wrist. To help you get started, we've created this how-to guide to show you how to set up each of the new watch face features. This guide assumes you know how to customize your Apple Watch's watch face. If you don't already know the process, head over to our how-to guide on that topic for reference. Photos Watch Faces Adding photos to your watch face only takes a few minutes to set up. In watchOS 2, you can either select a specific photo to display all of the time, or choose a photo album to see a different image every time you wake your watch.

How to Use Time Travel on Apple Watch in watchOS 2

With the recent update to watchOS 2, Apple added a new feature called Time Travel, which lets you turn back (or forward) time to display certain information from a different date and time. It works with complications on the watch face, like weather, calendar events, sunrise and sunset, stocks, and more. Depending on what you have displayed on your watch face, you'll see different information. Understanding Time Travel can be a bit confusing for some, so we'll explain it more in detail, with some highlights on what different watch faces can do. Before using Time Travel, be sure to set your complications the way you want them. Now that Apple allows third-party complications, the options are even better. This feature works best with such watch faces as Utility, Modular, Simple, Color, and Chronograph because those faces have the most customizable complication options.

How to Save Battery Life in iOS 9 With Low Power Mode

One frequent complaint of smartphone users is the limited amount of battery life our tech devices have. With the constant trend toward making devices thinner and lighter, battery life is a key tradeoff to be considered, and some users find their devices not lasting as long as they'd prefer. For those pushing their devices to the limit, Apple has added a new feature to iOS 9 that is designed to help you conserve those last few drops of juice when you wont be able to charge your iPhone anytime soon. The new feature is known as Low Power Mode, and it can increase your battery life up to three hours but at the expense of some functions of your device. It is only available on iPhone devices running iOS 9. Enabling Low Power Mode only takes a few steps. Open the Settings app on your iPhone. Select Battery from the menu list. Toggle Low Power Mode to the On position. The battery icon will turn yellow to indicate that you are using Low Power Mode. Low Power Mode reduces your iPhone's performance and cuts out some background activities. For example, mail must be fetched manually, background app refresh is disabled, and motion and brightness are reduced. Benchmarks have shown the iPhone's CPU performance with Low Power Mode on is significantly reduced in an effort to save on power consumption, so while simple tasks may continue to work just fine on an iPhone in Low Power Mode, more demanding ones may become sluggish. You don't have to keep Low Power Mode on all of the time; you can manually shut it off whenever you want. However, the general impression of

How to Update Apple Watch's watchOS Software

watchOS is the operating system that runs on the Apple Watch, powering its fitness tracking capabilities, apps, communication features, time-keeping abilities, and more. Apple plans to push regular updates to fix watchOS bugs, refine performance, and introduce new features, and the release of watchOS 2 alongside iOS 9 later today is a major uprade for the platform. (Update: Apple has delayed the public release of watchOS 2.) watchOS updates are installed in a unique way that differs from how we install iPhone and Mac updates, so we've crafted a quick tutorial to remind users how to get the latest version of watchOS on their Apple Watches so they're ready for watchOS 2.

How to Move Your Data From Android to iOS

In just a couple of weeks, Apple is going to make it ridiculously easy for Android users to switch to iOS with an upcoming app alongside iOS 9 called "Move to iOS." It will give Android users the ability to wirelessly migrate contacts, message history, photos and videos, web browser saves, mail, calendars, and more. Until then, we have to do these things manually. Luckily, it isn't difficult to switch from Android to iOS. It just takes a few extra steps to get all of the data you want from one device to the other. We've got a guide for helping you transition from Android to iOS as simply as possible. Before following any of the instructions below, be sure to back up your Android device to ensure that you don't lose any important data in the event that something goes wrong during the migration process. Transferring Contacts, Mail, and Calendars Luckily, Google makes it incredibly simple for you to sync your email, calendar, and contact information across practically any device. So, if you've been on Android for long enough, chances are most of your data is easily available to sync on iOS. Open the Settings app and tap Mail, Contacts, Calendar from the list of available options. Tap "Add Account." Then select Google from the list of available options. Enter the required information, including your email address, password, and description. When prompted, toggle the Contacts and Calendars switch to the on position.

How to Move Your Playlists from Spotify to Apple Music

We've been experimenting with Apple Music for over a month now, but there are still a few important questions that pop up with the new music streaming service, the first being "How can I import my playlists from Spotify?" The short answer is that you can't without using third-party software. After much research, we've found there are two fairly reliable third-party services that work well. One is called STAMP, and the other is called Move to Apple Music. Both automatically search for and add tracks from Spotify to Apple Music so you don't have to manually go through your entire collection song-by-song. While the end result is pretty much the same, each app offers different features. Before you get started, make sure you are logged into iTunes with your Apple ID and subscribed to Apple Music. With both STAMP and Move to Apple Music, you can download the program from each company's website. Both apps must be given special permission to control your computer.

How to Download Beats 1 Playlists for Offline Listening

Now that you've been testing out Apple Music for about a month, you've probably come across some questions about what else you can do with the streaming music service. We sure have. If you are a fan of Beats 1 but don't want to use up your data listening to Zane Lowe's voice on your commute to work everyday, you can download the playlist from your favorite deejays and listen to their chosen tunes offline for as long as you wish. You can't listen to Beats 1 live in offline mode, but you can access playlists from a deejay's previous radio show similar to the way you would access cable movies and television shows on-demand. Step 1: Find a Deejay The first thing you will need to do is find the deejay playlist you wish to listen to. If you want to find out whom Elton John is listening to, or think Julie Adenuga plays the songs you want to hear, you can find their Beats 1 playlists on their Apple Connect pages by performing a quick search in iTunes while in the Radio tab. The search will usually turn up "X on Beats 1" where X is the name of the deejay. Select that result to see a list of the deejay's playlists. Tracks will be listed by date, so you can easily find the most recent radio show, or even start from the beginning.

Tips for Getting Siri to Play Tracks in Apple Music

If you are signed up for the free, three-month trial of Apple Music, you probably know by now many of the cool features the streaming music service has to offer. But, did you know that Siri can make the experience even better? We've got a few tips for getting Siri to act as your digital deejay. To get the full use of Siri's compatibility with Apple Music, make sure you are subscribed and your iCloud Music Library is on. Play a Radio Station or Beats 1 Not only can Siri play a radio station like Electronic or Oldies, but now the personal assistant can also start playing live Beats 1 programming. Just ask her to "Play Beats 1." Play an Apple Music Playlist One of the things I love about Apple Music is the playlist feature in the For You section. If I've recently "liked" a particular song, A new playlist based on that will show up. If you know the name of an Apple Music created playlist, ask for it specifically. For example, "Play Souxie & The Banshees: Deep Cuts." What Song is Playing If Apple Music is playing a song you don't recognize, you can ask for more information. Just say, "What song is this?" to discover the artist and song title. Add an Album to Your Playlist If you like the song that is playing and want to hear the whole album, ask Siri to add the album to your playlist and it will begin playing after the current track is finished.

10 Things the Digital Crown and Side Button Do on Apple Watch

Other than touch-based screen gestures like tapping and swiping, the Digital Crown and Side buttons are the Apple Watch's only control mechanisms. You can use the Digital Crown to scroll through lists and zoom into pictures and maps, plus it can be used to control slider bars like volume and font size. The Side button is the Apple Watch's one-step access to contacts on your favorites list who you can then call, write a text, or even send your heartbeat. The Digital Crown and Side buttons have a few additional uses that you may not already know about. We've got a list of 10 important actions that the Apple Watch's external controls activate. Activate Siri In addition to saying "Hey Siri," you can activate the personal assistant by holding down the Digital Crown until you see "What can I help you with?" You will also feel a tap on your wrist, acknowledging that Siri is listening. Trigger Apple Pay When near a supported terminal, you don't have to open the Apple Pay app on Apple Watch to activate it. Simply double-tap the Side button to bring up your card information. Then hold it near a terminal to make the purchase.

How to Encrypt Your iOS Device's iTunes Backup

If you connect your iOS device to your computer to back up your data instead of using iCloud, some of your most private data is not backing up. For security reasons, by default, an iTunes backup will not include saved passwords, Wi-Fi settings, website history, or Health data. You can save information like passwords and website history in an iTunes backup if you encrypt it, which is an option that Apple offers. Encrypted backups are not the default option, but for those of you who want to be able to save more comprehensive backups to your computer, we've created a tutorial that walks you through encrypting iTunes backups and removing that encryption. If you back up your iOS device using iCloud, you do not have to follow any steps for encryption, as iCloud backups are automatically encrypted for you.

How to Customize Apple TV to Show Only the Channels You Use

We've been waiting for the fourth-generation Apple TV for at least two years now, and we've been teased with vague comments, leaks from the supply chain, and analyst predictions for several years running. We thought we’d get a look at it this year at the Worldwide Developers Conference, but Apple was still not ready to show it off. Until we get a whole new model with, hopefully, a brand new look to the operating system, we have to stick with what we've got. The number of media channels is not getting any smaller, with Apple adding new content on a regular basis. For example, Apple recently added NatGeo TV. Content options are great, but sifting through dozens of channels can be a pain sometimes. If you're tired of scrolling through the nearly seven dozen channels looking for the ones you use most, you can hide everything you don’t want to access, making it much easier to get to the content you want. We've got a quick tutorial to show you how.

Using the Timer, Alarm, and Stopwatch Apps on Apple Watch

Apple has separated its three time-based categories into separate apps on Apple Watch. This allows you to quickly access the specific feature of the timer, alarm, and stopwatch you want with just a few taps. While most of it is self-explanatory, we've got some tips for how to get the most out of each of these apps so they work the way you want, when you want. Timer The Timer app on Apple watch makes it possible for you to set a timer right from your wrist so you don't have to search out your iPhone to activate or even turn off the alert when time is up. Tap the Timer app icon on Apple Watch to open it. Then rotate the Digital Crown to adjust the time. When ready, tap the Start button. You can switch between a timer that goes from zero to 12 hours and a timer that goes from zero to 24 hours by firmly pressing the display screen.