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iPhone 6 Camera May Feature Electronic Image Stabilization, Bigger Pixel Size

iphone_5s_rear_camera Apple may be planning to use electronic image stabilization instead of optical image stabilization in the iPhone 6, according to new details shared on Weibo [Google Translate] by ESM China analyst Sun Chang Xu (via GforGames). Xu suggests that the iPhone 6's camera will also boast a larger pixel size of 1.75 um compared to the 1.5 um pixel size of the iPhone 5s' camera, which would result in a higher picture quality as more light can be taken in.

While previous reports have indicated that Apple is looking to integrate optical image stabilization into the iPhone 6, adding an electronic image stabilization system would allow for the device to have a slimmer camera that does not protrude out of its body. To this point, a number of alleged iPhone 6 images, including renders posted by Japanese magazine MacFan last month, have depicted the iPhone 6 with a protruding camera.

Xu also previously reported on her Weibo account that the iPhone 6 will add pressure, temperature, and humidity sensors, and that the iWatch will utilize optical sensors to measure heart rate and oxygen levels.

Apple is expected to launch the iPhone 6 this fall in two different sizes of 4.7-inches and 5.5-inches. The smaller 4.7-inch version of the iPhone 6 will likely ship first, while the larger 5.5-inch version is estimated to ship later due to challenges with the device's display technology and battery life.

In addition to a larger display and an improved camera, both models of the iPhone 6 are expected to include a thinner, bezel-free design, faster A8 processor, and Touch ID fingerprint sensor. The device will also likely debut with Apple's iOS 8 mobile operating system, which will feature improvements to Maps, Siri, and iCloud in addition to a new "Healthbook" app. Apple is also said to be negotiating with carriers to increase the price of the iPhone 6 by $100.

Related roundups: iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s, iPhone 6

Top Rated Comments

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17 weeks ago

How about better low-light performance?


bigger pixels MEANS better low-light performance. that's why a Nikon D4 or Canon 1Dx have a huge sensor and a low MP number --> big pixels can take a lot of light.

The Apple "middle"approach with around 8MP seems perfect. HTC has rly good low-light performance with the 4MP cameras but suck in "normal" conditions and the 16MP samsung ones suck in low light
Rating: 18 Votes
17 weeks ago
So we lose a bigger battery and optical image stabilization because some people have an obsession with razor thin metal....ffs stop making the phone thinner and start adding QoL features.
Rating: 15 Votes
17 weeks ago
Protruding cameras look pants, if you need a certain thickness for the camera then make the whole phone that thick
Rating: 14 Votes
17 weeks ago
Just give us decent battery life so i don't have to dock it 3 times a day!
Rating: 13 Votes
17 weeks ago
Increasing the pixel size is exactly the right thing to do! While all the marketing gurus are counting their megapixels, which lead to increasingly worse images with more noise, scaling up the pixels adds a lot to the image quality. More light, less noise.
Also read this website, which suggests that 6 megapixels are enough for most photographers and more megapixels only worsens the image: http://6mpixel.org/en/ (http://6mpixel.org/en/)
Rating: 11 Votes
17 weeks ago
How about better low-light performance?
Rating: 10 Votes
17 weeks ago
I would love some kind of RAW format (optional, naturally). Especially since we now have Lightroom available on iOS. Even 10-bit would make a big difference. Or optionally, higher-bpp JPG. People are using a lot more stacked filters with phone images these days and 8-bit JPGs can't handle much manipulation without degrading.
Rating: 6 Votes
17 weeks ago
I like the iPod Touch size idea..
Rating: 6 Votes
17 weeks ago

Increasing the pixel size is exactly the right thing to do! While all the marketing gurus are counting their megapixels, which lead to increasingly worse images with more noise, scaling up the pixels adds a lot to the image quality. More light, less noise.
Also read this website, which suggests that 6 megapixels are enough for most photographers and more megapixels only worsens the image: http://6mpixel.org/en/ (http://6mpixel.org/en/)

Yes, going above 6 MP is really only good for cropping photos for a "fake zoom" for most users.

For people thinking 6 MP seems low, it's beyond what can be shown by a Retina display (6 MP = 3000x2000; 15" Retina display = 2880x1800)! No one ever complained that a Retina display was fuzzy, and few need larger prints than 15". It's beyond Retina resolution beyond photo album size.

Here's the trend for most popular screen resolutions on the web: (Source: StatCounter (http://gs.statcounter.com/#desktop-resolution-ww-yearly-2011-2014))

2011: 1024x768. 0.8 MP.
2012: 1366x768. 1.0 MP
2013: 1366x768. 1.0 MP
2014: 1366x768. 1.0 MP

We're moving very slowly forward if it's photos aimed for the web and not print. I wonder how many smartphone users even print their photos, much less at poster size? Even if you want some leeway and good quality for a typical 24" display, you'd still only be getting at 2-3 MP.

DSLR's tend to have 12-18 MP (full frame ones even more) but that's in order to let the photographer print just that: Posters. If you use an iPhone to print a poster, you're simply using the wrong tool for the job since optics will at that point play a MUCH greater role than the resolution of the camera. The lens element is still miniscule, as well as the gathered light. I mean... This is why larger cameras exist. It's a consequence of a larger sensor, which in turn will demand larger lens elements.
Rating: 5 Votes
17 weeks ago
Good to see the improvements, still not sure why it has to be thinner. Put a big battery in so I don't have to charge it multiple times a day when you actually use it.
Rating: 5 Votes

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