New in OS X: Get MacRumors Push Notifications on your Mac

Resubscribe Now Close

Apple's In-Store Reuse and Recycling Program Now Offering Trade-In Credit for Used iPads

As part of a larger green initiative to help consumers recycle old iOS devices, Apple is now expanding its Reuse & Recycling program in the U.S. and Canada to include the iPad, reports 9to5Mac. Apple also is making it easier for consumers to purchase new devices with more flexible terms for applying in-store credits obtained when recycling an iOS device.

apple_recycling_program
Previously, Apple's in-store Reuse & Recycling program accepted only iPhone models, which customers could trade-in for a store credit that could be used to purchase a new iPhone. Under this new plan, Apple will accept either an iPad or an iPhone for trade-in and will issue a credit that can be used towards a new purchase.

Customers may apply this credit towards a new iPhone or iPad, regardless of which device they are trading in, and they can even combine iPad and iPhone credits (with a limit of one of each device type) to apply toward the purchase of a new device. For example, a customer could trade-in an iPhone 5 and an iPad 2 to receive credits that can be combined to purchase a new iPad Air.

Apple yesterday confirmed it was expanding its Reuse & Recycling program to include all devices, regardless of their condition. Besides the iPad, Apple will accept for free any broken or older model Apple product providing customers with a way to easily recycle the device responsibly. If a recycled iPhone or iPad has some remaining value as determined by in-store Apple Specialists, Apple will issue a store credit.

apple_green_banner
This expansion is part of Apple's Earth Day celebration that began with the company's "Better" environmental campaign, which highlighted Apple's environmental efforts across its supply chain, its data centers and in its new Apple Campus 2 project. Apple also is commemorating Earth Day at its retail stores by placing a green leaf on its traditionally white Apple logo and issuing green t-shirts to its retail employees.

Related roundups: iPad Air, iPad mini

Top Rated Comments

(View all)

22 weeks ago

... funny they should try and make out how green they are when they are the leading company at stopping you from upgrading things to make them last longer.


You may have forgotten:

- Macs have a longer useable life and better resale value than PCs.

- iPads/iPhones have a longer usable life and better resale value than Android.

If you want to talk about planned obsolescence, just look at the lack of software updates for Android devices after they have your money!

Every iPad 1 I know of is still happily in use. Every iPad 2 is able to run THE latest version of iOS!

And their claims about green energy and materials? True, well-documented, and NOT matched by the competition you wish they'd become more like.

Very few people upgrade bits inside their PCs, and even fewer inside their phones and tablets. They simply throw them away. The fantasy of widespread internal upgrades is just that.

(I do see the appeal, and I kind of wish your vision of how people use computers were true!)
Rating: 10 Votes
22 weeks ago
The funny thing is.

Apple is THE WORST company for making computing products locked down, glued together, non up-gradable.

Apple started the trend and others, seeing this works have started to copy them.

You could have an old PC for years and keep changing little bits here and there as and when, but Apple want you to throw the whole unit away and buy a whole new one.

So funny they should try and make out how green they are when they are the leading company at stopping you from upgrading things to make them last longer.

----------

Just go to the site and they’ve got a value estimator:

http://store.apple.com/us/iphone/reuse-and-recycling

That’s good for iPads and other devices too (even though it indicates “iPhone”)


Apple iPad 1st Generation 32GB (Wi-Fi)
Estimate provided by PowerON:
$55.00


haa haa haaa
:D
Rating: 7 Votes
22 weeks ago
Yeah because most consumers want to deal with upgrading internal parts in their devices. BS. People want the latest and greatest, they want shiny and new.
Rating: 5 Votes
22 weeks ago


You could have an old PC for years and keep changing little bits here and there as and when, but Apple want you to throw the whole unit away and buy a whole new one.

What is the difference throwing away "little bits" over years vs the whole thing at once? Sounds like you've thrown away more in total than someone getting a Mac every few years. Maybe you should just worry about your own recycling. Apple is one place you can do that.
Rating: 3 Votes
22 weeks ago
Just go to the site and they’ve got a value estimator:

http://store.apple.com/us/iphone/reuse-and-recycling

That’s good for iPads and other devices too (even though it indicates “iPhone”)
Rating: 2 Votes
22 weeks ago

The funny thing is.

Apple is THE WORST company for making computing products locked down, glued together, non up-gradable.

Apple started the trend and others, seeing this works have started to copy them.

You could have an old PC for years and keep changing little bits here and there as and when, but Apple want you to throw the whole unit away and buy a whole new one.

So funny they should try and make out how green they are when they are the leading company at stopping you from upgrading things to make them last longer.

----------



Apple iPad 1st Generation 32GB (Wi-Fi)
Estimate provided by PowerON:
$55.00


haa haa haaa
:D


Given that laptops, phones and tablets are mostly not upgradeable anyway, your comment seems to be relevant only when talking about desktop computers (except the Mac Pro which is upgradeable). That means only the iMac and Mac mini, ie. 2 products out of Apple’s entire range.

My parents are still using my first generation iPhone and iPad, and my MacBook Pro is over 6 years old now and I still use it as my main machine running Mavericks. I don’t have confidence in other brands to deliver this kind of longevity, upgradeable parts/replaceable batteries or not.
Rating: 2 Votes
22 weeks ago

You may have forgotten:

- Macs have a longer useable life and better resale value than PCs.

- iPads/iPhones have a longer usable life and better resale value than Android.

If you want to talk about planned obsolescence, just look at the lack of software updates for Android devices after they have your money!

Every iPad 1 I know of is still happily in use. Every iPad 2 is able to run THE latest version of iOS!

And their claims about green energy and materials? True, well-documented, and NOT matched by the competition you wish they'd become more like.

Very few people upgrade bits inside their PCs, and even fewer inside their phones and tablets. They simply throw them away. The fantasy of widespread internal upgrades is just that.

(I do see the appeal, and I kind of wish your vision of how people use computers were true!)


I better phone up all the PC component supplies you sell graphics cards, memory upgrades, new hard drives, new CPU's and tell them they are wasting their time as it's just a fantasy.

I have kept the bulk of my PC many times and just upgraded bits as I needed them, or what were expensive components have come down to a price I am willing to pay.

No point in changing anything major yet from my "Sandybridge" system as the gains are minimal.

The extra Ram, new SSD and new graphics card keep it tip top.
Something I could not do with an iMac (Laptop on a stand)
Rating: 1 Votes
22 weeks ago

Apart from the lack of Mac mini updates, this is the part that might push me into Hackintosh territory.


Hear hear!
Discussing Hackintosh feels heretical but I admit, I have gone to a couple sites to spec out a hypothetical Hackintosh. Back in the "glory" days of the PM 7500 series, G3,G4 towers, heck, even the original iMac*, you could upgrade the CPU, HD, optical drive, or GPU, and laptops had replaceable batteries.

The push to non-upgradability has nothing to do with style. The recycling program pays lip service to the environment while the corporate culture pushes absurdly quick planned obsolescence.

If recycling were 100% efficient I would not mind so much but in reality most recycling programs ship products to China where coal-powered smelters inefficiently separate various components while toxic emissions poison the air for hundreds of kilometers.

In the mean time, if a Hackintosh PSU goes, you can get a new one. If the CPU goes, you can get a new one. You don't have to sacrifice the whole machine for failure of one part. They are environmentally superior to the machines Apple currently sells.


*original Bondi Blue iMacs had replaceable CPUs and a slot to add in a GPU. The 8MB VoodooII worked. You could even replace the CD drive with a DVD drive or 2nd hard drive if you wanted to.
Rating: 1 Votes
22 weeks ago

Yeah because most consumers want to deal with upgrading internal parts in their devices. BS. People want the latest and greatest, they want shiny and new.


Go Green. Toss it and buy new. Apple needs the money ;)

Happy Earth Day!
Rating: 1 Votes
22 weeks ago

I better phone up all the PC component supplies you sell graphics cards, memory upgrades, new hard drives, new CPU's and tell them they are wasting their time as it's just a fantasy.

I have kept the bulk of my PC many times and just upgraded bits as I needed them, or what were expensive components have come down to a price I am willing to pay.

No point in changing anything major yet from my "Sandybridge" system as the gains are minimal.

The extra Ram, new SSD and new graphics card keep it tip top.
Something I could not do with an iMac (Laptop on a stand)


I upgraded my sandybridge imac with topped out ram, a SSD in place of the disc drive and it runs mavericks faster than when I bought it with snow leopard :rolleyes:

Coming up on 5 years and my iMac has outlasted all my old PC's, call it a "Laptop on a stand" but is a damn good laptop:apple:
Rating: 1 Votes

[ Read All Comments ]