Dan Riccio


'Dan Riccio' Articles

Jony Ive Says Holding Onto Features When There's a 'Better Way' is 'Path That Leads to Failure'

After naming the iPhone X as one of the 25 Best Inventions of the Year, TIME sat down for an interview about the smartphone with Apple's design chief Jony Ive and hardware engineering chief Dan Riccio. Riccio believes the iPhone X paves the way for the next 10 years of smartphones, given its radical redesign with a nearly edge to edge display, no home button, and advanced cameras for facial recognition and augmented reality. "There were these extraordinarily complex problems that needed to be solved," said Ive. "Paying attention to what's happened historically actually helps give you some faith that you are going to find a solution." That history includes, in part, Apple removing the headphone jack on the iPhone 7 last year, parting ways with the built-in disc drive on the MacBook Pro after 2012, and ditching the floppy drive on the iMac G3 in 1998. "I actually think the path of holding onto features that have been effective, the path of holding onto those whatever the cost, is a path that leads to failure," said Ive. "And in the short term, it's the path that feels less risky and it's the path that feels more secure." Ive acknowledged that it's not always easy for Apple to move past a feature or technology when it believes there's a "better way," and it's easy to see his point given the controversy that each change has generated. Apple was criticized by a fair number of customers for removing the headphone jack on the iPhone last year, for example, and even competitors like Google and Samsung used it as an opportunity to poke fun at Apple. After

Apple Dismisses Rumors of Ever Putting Touch ID on Back, Side, or Under Display of iPhone X

For over a year leading up to the iPhone X, rumors ran rampant about Touch ID being placed under the display, or on the back or side of the device, but Apple's hardware engineering chief Dan Riccio says the reports were never true. In an interview with TechCrunch's editor-in-chief Matthew Panzarino, Riccio said Apple "spent no time" looking at implementing fingerprint authentication in these ways because it was already focused on perfecting Face ID."I heard some rumor [that] we couldn't get Touch ID to work through the glass so we had to remove that," Riccio says, answering a question about whether there were late design changes. "When we hit early line of sight on getting Face ID to be [as] good as it was, we knew that if we could be successful we could enable the product that we wanted to go off and do and if that's true it could be something that we could burn the bridges and be all in with. This is assuming it was a better solution. And that's what we did. So we spent no time looking at fingerprints on the back or through the glass or on the side because if we did those things, which would be a last-minute change, they would be a distraction relative to enabling the more important thing that we were trying to achieve, which was Face ID done in a high-quality way."Rumors about Apple embedding Touch ID into the iPhone X's display surfaced as early as May 2016, so it remains possible that the company at least explored the idea, but never proceeded with it after moving forward with Face ID. Several reports corroborated the rumors as recently as this past summer,

Apple Senior Vice Presidents Phil Schiller and Dan Riccio Sell Stock Worth Over $20 Million

Apple senior vice presidents Phil Schiller and Dan Riccio recently exercised and sold more than 40,000 combined common stock shares worth over $20 million, according to documents filed today with the SEC. Schiller sold 37,172 shares of common stock at a price of $500 for a total haul of $18.6 million. Riccio sold a total of 3,754 shares of common stock over the course of 11 trades with prices ranging from $498.75 to $502.40 for a total of around $1.9 million. Last November Schiller was one of the Apple executives that was awarded 150,000 RSUs as an incentive to remain employed at Apple. Half of those shares vested on June 21, 2013 while the other half will vest on March 21, 2016. In addition to those 75,000 shares vesting in 2016, Schiller has thousands of shares of stock remaining. The moves to sell come two weeks after Apple directors Bill Campbell and Millard Drexler sold their stock options, three weeks after CFO Peter Oppenheimer sold his stock and almost two months after Apple SVPs Jeff Williams and Bruce Sewell cashed in on their

Craig Federighi and Dan Riccio Receive Stock Grants Worth $50 Million Each

Following their appointments to Apple's senior executive team, Craig Federighi and Dan Riccio have each been granted 75,000 restricted stock units by Apple. The grants, which were revealed in filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission covering Federighi and Riccio, are worth roughly $50 million apiece at today's stock price, although they do not convert into actual shares for some time. According to the vesting schedule, Federighi and Riccio will each see 25,000 of their restricted stock units convert into actual shares on December 23, 2013, with another 25,000 following on April 23, 2015 and the final batch of 25,000 converting August 23, 2016. Including actual shares as well as previous restricted stock unit grants that are converting to shares over time, Federighi holds roughly $97 million worth of stock rights at Apple's present share price, while Riccio's holdings would be worth about $89 million. Grants of restricted stock units are typically issued both as bonuses for previous work as well as incentives to remain with the company. With the units vesting over time, recipients are generally required to remain employed with the company through each vesting date in order for those units to convert into redeemable

Craig Federighi and Dan Riccio Named Senior Executives, Bob Mansfield to Remain at Apple

Apple today announced that Craig Federighi and Dan Riccio will be joining the company's senior executive team, receiving promotions to the Senior Vice President level. Craig Federighi (left) and Dan Riccio (right) Federighi succeeded Bertrand Serlet as head of Mac Software Engineering in early 2011, but was not elevated to the senior executive team at that time. Riccio is currently transitioning to lead Hardware Engineering as Bob Mansfield steps down.As senior vice president of Mac Software Engineering, Federighi will continue to be responsible for the development of Mac OS X and Apple’s common operating system engineering teams. Federighi worked at NeXT, followed by Apple, and then spent a decade at Ariba where he held several roles including vice president of Internet Services and chief technology officer. He returned to Apple in 2009 to lead Mac OS X engineering. Federighi holds a Master of Science degree in Computer Science and a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley. Riccio, as senior vice president of Hardware Engineering, will lead the Mac, iPhone, iPad and iPod engineering teams. He has been instrumental in all of Apple’s iPad products since the first generation iPad. Riccio joined Apple in 1998 as vice president of Product Design and has been a key contributor to most of Apple’s hardware over his career. Dan earned a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1986.Apple has also announced that Mansfield will remain with the company