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AT&T Expands Wi-Fi Calling to Cover International Calls to U.S. When Traveling

AT&T first introduced Wi-Fi calling in October of 2015, allowing customers to place calls over Wi-Fi in instances where a cellular connection is poor. At launch, AT&T's Wi-Fi calling feature could only be used within the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, but as of this week, Wi-Fi calls can also be made from other countries.

Starting this afternoon, and following the iOS 9.3 update, AT&T began sending text messages to customers notifying them of the change. When traveling abroad, a call placed to the United States or received from the United States using Wi-Fi calling will incur no long distance charges, a feature that should be highly useful to AT&T customers who are visiting another country and calling home.

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As long as a U.S. number is calling another U.S. number using Wi-Fi calling, there will be no charge, regardless of physical location. Calling an international number from a U.S. phone with Wi-Fi calling will continue to incur standard international call charges.

In a domestic coverage area, Wi-Fi calling is enabled whenever wireless network coverage is weak or unavailable. When outside of a domestic coverage area, Wi-Fi calling is now turned on whenever a phone connects to a Wi-Fi network. AT&T's Wi-Fi calling website has been updated with new text to reflect the updated capabilities.
Use Wi-Fi Calling to talk and text over an active Wi-Fi connection. Wi-Fi Calling lets you talk and text from indoor locations where it's hard even for a strong cellular signal to reach. Wi-Fi Calling can be used in the Domestic Coverage Area (U.S., Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands) and from most international countries.
The new international Wi-Fi calling feature is available on the iPhone 6, 6s, 6 Plus, 6s Plus, and newly introduced iPhone SE, so long as iOS 9.3 is installed.

AT&T is also notifying customers about a change to NumberSync, which now allows devices linked to an iPhone to make or receive calls over an AT&T cellular connection, something that wasn't previously possible.

The NumberSync feature allows AT&T users to make calls and send text messages using their phone number from a device like an iPad or Mac even when their iPhone is turned off or in another location. Previously, devices had to be connected to Wi-Fi to use the feature, but starting today, a cellular iPad or other device with a cellular connection can use it to make NumberSync calls when a connected iPhone is unavailable.



Top Rated Comments

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18 weeks ago

AT&T, don't you guys know that you guys are still a rip off when I am traveling overseas?
Besides, have you guys at AT&T heard of an app called Whasapp? I can call using that on Wi-Fi to anyone in the world that has a smart phone with the app...
Now, tell me why in the world do I want to use your Wi-Fi calling to oversea numbers?

So if you've decided to extend your trip a couple of days and you need to call your dentist and reschedule an appointment, you just call your dentist's receptionists smart phone with the WhatsApp app on the phone.

You find out your best friend has been in an accident and is in the hospital. But they don't allow cell phones in his room. You just call the main hospital switchboard's WhatsApp, and they connect you to your friend's room.

Making wifi calls for cheap or even free has been possible for a long time. Six years ago I used Skype to call home from the UK on my iPhone (I kept the phone in airplane mode to ensure I didn't accidentally make a call over cellular roaming). But AT&T (and the other carriers that now offer this service) has made it easier. You don't need a special app, and you can call any us phone number whether or not they have the matching app.
Rating: 10 Votes
18 weeks ago
T-Mobile's Mobile Without Borders is the best way to use a smartphone outside the United States, without a doubt.

All the other carriers are so behind in that aspect.
Rating: 9 Votes
18 weeks ago

AT&T, don't you guys know that you guys are still a rip off when I am traveling overseas?
Besides, have you guys at AT&T heard of an app called Whasapp? I can call using that on Wi-Fi to anyone in the world that has a smart phone with the app...
Now, tell me why in the world do I want to use your Wi-Fi calling to oversea numbers?


Because 99% of all people don't have Whatsapp.

This is a free service that seems to be mostly targeted toward US travelers to be able to call home for free while abroad. Considering how few things AT&T gives us for free, I think you should just take this as a huge win and keep using Whatsapp if you want to.
Rating: 5 Votes
18 weeks ago

AT&T, don't you guys know that you guys are still a rip off when I am traveling overseas?
Besides, have you guys at AT&T heard of an app called Whasapp? I can call using that on Wi-Fi to anyone in the world that has a smart phone with the app...
Now, tell me why in the world do I want to use your Wi-Fi calling to oversea numbers?


Because WhatsApp is Facebook owned and they use all that data to market to you and build a better profile about you.

Plus you can simply do this like placing any other call with AT&T. No need for an app or the extra overhead it brings.
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T-Mobile's Mobile Without Borders is the best way to use a smartphone outside the United States, without a doubt.

All the other carriers are so behind in that aspect.


But that means you have to have T-Mobile and that means you're behind all other carriers to begin with when it comes to LTE speeds and coverage area.
Rating: 4 Votes
18 weeks ago
It also works on airplane WiFi for a while now...
Rating: 3 Votes
18 weeks ago

If only they would add wi-fi calling to gophone.

Go post-paid. There is no reason why AT&T should offer premium features like VoLTE or VoWiFi to the lower-end customers.
Rating: 2 Votes
18 weeks ago

no, it says "of America" . America is a continent, its sad how bad geography textbooks and classes are taught in the US. Just like some sports call world championships some of their finals and contests played in the US.


Since you're a fan of technicalities, "America" is not a continent either. Classes and textbooks in the US teach the difference between North America and South America.
Rating: 2 Votes
18 weeks ago
If only they would add wi-fi calling to gophone.
Rating: 2 Votes
18 weeks ago
AT&T, don't you guys know that you guys are still a rip off when I am traveling overseas?
Besides, have you guys at AT&T heard of an app called Whasapp? I can call using that on Wi-Fi to anyone in the world that has a smart phone with the app...
Now, tell me why in the world do I want to use your Wi-Fi calling to oversea numbers?
Rating: 2 Votes
18 weeks ago

You both are funny, like I said geography classes in the US are horrible, just look at both your posts.
Out of all the countries that are in America, only the US uses the 7 continent model instead of the standard 6 continent model. The US used to use the 6 continent model until WWII so you should brush up on it [USER=114772]@darngooddesign[/USER] . Still even if you want to use the less common 7 model they are still continents [USER=549367]@igorsky[/USER] lol.

You guys let me know when the olympics break america into two rings. (Antartica is not part of the games of course)


It's a good thing for our poor Geography skills that science is there to settle this for us. There's a little thing called Plate Tectonics. And there's most certainly 7 Continents and even more if you count sub-continents and submerged continents. The 6 continent model combines the single landmass of Eurasia, but that can even be sub-divided by plates further. But you're referring to the Americas, which are 2 continents in every model... and your Olympic Ring argument (strangest counter-argument ever) separates Europe and Asia anyway, sooooo.......

The Olympics have no bearing on this. Nor will they ever.

Chances are you're from Latin America somewhere... as the only group of people that ever want to cry about the term.

However, the country has *always* been referred to as America since its inception. So it's time for you to brush up on history. George Washington, a sorta important guy in the early years of the nation, said in his farewell address, "The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism..."

John Adams, the 1st Vice President, the 2nd President referred to the nation as "America" in his Inaugural Address. A good century before any of the "imperialistic" or "jingoistic" claims you'll certainly fall back on next were even in the picture. Let alone the fact the 2 continents being named America in the first place is imperialistic since it's a Latin name from the Italian guy that mapped it to prove it wasn't part of Asia, rather than some native tribal name.

Let's step 20-odd years back in time from 1796. That litte war that was fought between the colonies, France and England? The English call it the American War for Independence in their text books to this day. So I guess it isn't an "American" thing after all.

American is a term given to the people of British Colonies, by the British, before the country existed and it has stuck.

There's plenty of other historical documents that refer to the country as America, and the people as American... but let's step into the modern-day world. It's also the only country on the 2 continents with "America" in its name, and coupled with its use for the region since its very inception... one shouldn't have much trouble disseminating what it means.

The term is very simple. It can be used in either sense, and it will always be used in either sense because the context is very clear.

Anyhow, we're way off topic. So I retire from this side track.
Rating: 2 Votes

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