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High Definition iTunes Music Downloads May Be on the Horizon

ituneslogo.jpgEarlier this week, a report suggested Apple was planning a "dramatic overhaul" of its iTunes Music store to combat declining music downloads, which could include an on-demand streaming music service and an Android version of iTunes.

Apple may also be planning to add high resolution audio downloads to iTunes as part of the revamp, allowing users to download lossless 24-bit audio files. According to music blogger Robert Hutton, who cites an unspecified source, Apple is going to roll out hi-res iTunes music downloads in early June, possibly at WWDC.
For several years, Apple have been insisting that labels provide files for iTunes in 24 bit format - preferably 96k or 192k sampling rate. So they have undeniably the biggest catalog of hi-res audio in the world.

And the Led Zeppelin remasters in high resolution will be the kick off event - to coincide with Led Zep in hi-res, Apple will flip the switch and launch their hi-res store via iTunes - and apparently, it will be priced a buck above the typical current file prices.

That's right - Apple will launch hi-res iTunes in two months.
Apple has been working on offering music in a 24-bit format for several years, with a 2011 report suggesting the company was in talks with record labels to increase the quality of iTunes Music. Currently, Apple sells audio files on iTunes in 16-bit lossy AAC format encoded at 256 kbps to minimize file size.

High-definition 24-bit downloads are said to offer better detail, greater depth, and a deeper bass response compared to traditional 16-bit music downloads, but the file sizes are much larger.

Though Apple only offers 16-bit audio files at present, the company does encourage artists to submit music in a 24-bit 96kHz resolution, which it uses to "create more accurate encodes." Apple accepts the audio files as part of its Mastered for iTunes program, an initiative that has produced higher quality music for the iTunes Store. Because Apple has already accepted 24-bit files for years, it does, presumably, have a large catalog of high quality audio files that could be offered for sale, reportedly at a premium of $1 over traditional iTunes tracks.

Hi-res audio has been gaining popularity in recent years, with music sites such as HDtracks securing deals with multiple major record labels. Recently, musician and song writer Neil Young launched a Kickstarter project for the PonoPlayer, a $399 digital music player designed to play high resolution audio files.

Thus far, the project has earned over $5.7 million, suggesting there is indeed a sizable demand for hi-res audio. Should Apple choose to begin selling 24-bit audio tracks, it could quickly dominate competing sites given its existing user base and boost its digital downloads by appealing to audiophiles unhappy with the current quality of iTunes tracks.

Thanks Phil

Top Rated Comments

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7 months ago

Only a fool would by 24/192 "hi-res" files. It's placebo.


I find that people who have spent their lives listening to music through crummy laptop speakers often say similar things.
Rating: 57 Votes
7 months ago
So, they want to charge a PREMIUM on top of their already "premium priced" music? They're already one of the more expensive music stores.

They should be swapping the old low bitrate music for free with the higher better quality.

Do i have to buy all my music AGAIN? do i have to pay a premiumm upgrade fee just to get better quality of the same music?

Sounds like a desperate money grab
Rating: 35 Votes
7 months ago
Here's to hoping they allow upgrades to the 24bit quality via iTunes match.
Rating: 29 Votes
7 months ago
Only a fool would by 24/192 "hi-res" files. It's placebo.
Rating: 25 Votes
7 months ago

So, they want to charge a PREMIUM on top of their already "premium priced" music? They're already one of the more expensive music stores.

They should be swapping the old low bitrate music for free with the higher better quality.

Do i have to buy all my music AGAIN? do i have to pay a premiumm upgrade fee just to get better quality of the same music?


Tell that to the music labels not Apple.
Rating: 17 Votes
7 months ago
Sorry, but 192k sampling rate is TOTAL overkill and simply a waste of space, even if you plug in your Mac/ future iPhone with 192k audio support into the best DAC/amplifier/speakers out there ...
Rating: 14 Votes
7 months ago
So basically for the average user, Apple will be saying "Here, you can buy the old version of the song for $1.29 OR for $2.00 you can buy the exact same version that will likely sound exactly the same to you, but will have HD next to it and take up more space on your iPod."

Essentially they are the salesman off of Family Guy.
Rating: 14 Votes
7 months ago
Finally! Now all we need is a 128gb iPhone ;)
Rating: 13 Votes
7 months ago

we bought zeppelin on

vinyl
reel to reel
8-track
cassette
cd
mini disc
sa cd
hd dvd
blueray
mp3
m4a
aiff
wav
ringtone
flac
and now they want to make a new format ?! :mad:

No Thanks!


No reason for it to be a new format. ALAC does 24-bit already
Rating: 12 Votes
7 months ago

Only a fool would by 24/192 "hi-res" files. It's placebo.


I don't trust the industry to deliver me useful 24/192 "hi-res' files when they can't even give me good 16/44.1 normal res files.

On the flip side, maybe they'll stop dynamically compressing the hell out of the music for the "hi-res" files. There's not a need for 24/192 to do this (16/44.1 is plenty), but maybe it'll just come along for the ride. I know, I know, pipe dream. But sometimes dreaming is fun.

I'd be happy with lossless 16/44.1, but properly mixed. I'd pay an extra buck per song just for that.
Rating: 11 Votes

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