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Apple's Massive 'Steve Jobs Patent' for the iPhone Reconfirmed in its Entirety

Last December, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in response to a challenge preliminarily invalidated the so-called "Steve Jobs patent", a massive 364-page patent with 293 pages of drawings dating back to September 2006 and covering many details of the original iPhone. Steve Jobs is listed as the first of over two dozen inventors on the patent, and it is considered perhaps the most famous of his over 300 credited patents.

steve_jobs_patent_with_figure
But as noted by FOSS Patents, the USPTO has now completed its reexamination of the patent and ruled that all twenty claims have been confirmed as patentable, significantly strengthening a patent that has been used against several of Apple's competitors in court.
As we speak, the Steve Jobs patent is even stronger than it was before someone (presumably Samsung and Google) challenged it anonymously. On September 4, 2013, the USPTO issued a reexamination certificate confirming the patentability of all 20 claims because the prior art neither anticipated this invention nor renders it obvious.
A number of Apple's key patents have been challenged for reexamination as its competitors have sought to derail Apple's claims against them in various court battles. While the USPTO has issued preliminary "first office actions" invalidating those patents in some cases, Apple has been successful in arguing its case and ultimately restoring the validity of at least the most important claims of those patents. In an example from earlier this year, a key claim of Apple's "rubber banding" patent used against Samsung was confirmed after having been preliminary invalidated last year.

Top Rated Comments

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12 months ago
Glad to see credit being returned to where it's due.
Rating: 41 Votes
12 months ago
Looking back at it all, the iPhone is so incredible. Even the first one from almost 7 years ago still blows my mind. I'm glad that I've been alive to see this kind of stuff.
Rating: 40 Votes
12 months ago
Congratulations to the real innovators!
Rating: 33 Votes
12 months ago

Scott Forstall is the #2 listed inventor. I know it sounds conspiracy nutty but I still think Scott wasn't 'forced out' but strategically put out for a 'time in the wilderness' so he can return later (if Apple gets off track, like in the 90's) as Steve Jobs #2, returning to fix the mess.

Or if they don't go off track, they are fine. They just have a plan either way.

I know. Nutty.


LOL, love your post. Might be time for you to have your coffee. :D
Rating: 23 Votes
12 months ago
7 years is just ridiculously long. I hope Apple can use this to smack Samsung up the head.
Rating: 14 Votes
12 months ago
Whoo-hoo! Big win for Apple! Steve Jobs would be proud!
Rating: 13 Votes
12 months ago
Jobs had the vision to see where the puck was going to be and skate to it. There were NO guarantees that the iPhone would be a success. Jobs literally bet the farm on the iPhone, a gamble that has paid off to titanic proportions.

On the other hand, Samsung (and others) haven't truly innovated a damn thing in the multi-touch space. They keep skating to where the puck was a few moments ago and, along the way, steal Apple's ideas.

This will all be tied up in the courts for many more years to come. But it's becoming increasingly obvious that, ultimately, Samsung, Google and their ilk are going to have to pay the piper.

It's too bad that Steve Jobs didn't live long enough to enjoy the final outcome. But, today, I'll hoist a cold one in Steve's honor for having the balls to see the future and gamble his company on making it happen!

Mark
Rating: 13 Votes
12 months ago
Scott Forstall is the #2 listed inventor. I know it sounds conspiracy nutty but I still think Scott wasn't 'forced out' but strategically put out for a 'time in the wilderness' so he can return later (if Apple gets off track, like in the 90's) as Steve Jobs #2, returning to fix the mess.

Or if they don't go off track, they are fine. They just have a plan either way.

I know. Nutty.
Rating: 10 Votes
12 months ago
7 years? Wow...glad its finally over and a decision was made in favor of the true innovators here. :)
Rating: 9 Votes
12 months ago

I'm assuming this is not the bounce back/rubber banding patent but something different?


It's the scroll lock patent. You know, where a swipe can either move the screen around, or just do a vertical or horizontal scroll, depending on the angle.

(Judge Posner did not like this patent because it had no angle ranges. Pretty vague patent in some ways.)

oh, snap - Apple just got a nuclear weapon!


Nope.

... a massive 364-page patent with 293 pages of drawings dating back to September 2006 and covering many details of the original iPhone.


You'll actually see a lot of the same drawings and pages used in multiple Apple patents, as their standard background introduction.

Steve Jobs is listed as the first of over two dozen inventors on the patent, and it is considered perhaps the most famous ...


Which is weird in a way, since it's neither the most well known (like slide-to-unlock) nor important iPhone related patent. But it was the first people saw with all the drawings, and with Jobs name ceremonially listed at the top along with former SVP Forstall, so that made it famous.

...of his over 300 credited patents.


Interestingly, 85% of those are ornamental design patents. Such as the look of the Mac Mini, where he's listed among a dozen others.

Besides the patent shown in this thread, the few utility patents where he was listed first, included one for the Off slider, and one for an icon changing shape while being dragged.
Rating: 9 Votes

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