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Refurbished 13-Inch Retina MacBook Pro Models Appear in Apple's Online Store

Apple today added the new 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro to the refurbished section of its online store, giving prospective customers the opportunity to save 15% compared to brand-new machine. Currently available models include:

- 2.5 GHz Core i5 with 128 GB storage: $1439, compared to $1699 new

- 2.5 GHz Core i5 with 256 GB storage: $1699, compared to $1999 new

- 2.9 GHz Core i7 with 512 GB storage: $2289, compared to $2689 new


All three models are listed as shipping in 1-3 business days.

As with all of Apple's refurbished products, the 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro units have been thoroughly tested and reconditioned and carry a one-year warranty equal to that offered on brand-new machines.

The addition of the 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro to Apple's refurbished store comes roughly two weeks after the appearance of 15-inch models. But with the 13-inch models having just been introduced in October, some four months after the launch of the 15-inch models, the smaller Retina MacBook Pro has made the transition to the refurbished store much more quickly than its larger sibling.

(Thanks, Alan!)

Related roundup: MacBook Pro

Top Rated Comments

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21 months ago
$1439 sounds like a good price for a NEW one... Should have been around that price to begin with.
Rating: 20 Votes
21 months ago
I'm holding out until the updates, if Apple do discontinue the classic MacBook Pro line I would assume the price on the retina models would decrease.
Rating: 9 Votes
21 months ago

I knew you would. ;)

Again, all your spin is worthless in light of the 15" rMBP's pricing. That's what people are basing themselves on when they claim the 13" rMBP should be 1499$. Because by all logic that went into pricing the 15", it should be 1499$. Anything else you come up with is pro-Apple spin, and frankly, should be left as a job for Apple employees, not consumers (consumers should never try to justify higher prices).


I'm an Apple consumer, but I'm also an Apple owner. As the former, I want to pay as little as possible. As the latter, I want others to pay as much as possible. The only "logic" that should go into pricing for any business is what is best for long-term profitability. Sure, I'd have rather personally pay $200 less, but I understand why Apple priced it the way they did (because they can). I'm not saying I'm happy about it as a consumer. If you don't think it's worth $1699, then don't buy it.
Rating: 9 Votes
21 months ago
*continues to wait for 13" rMBA*

:D
Rating: 7 Votes
21 months ago
I'm not paying 1400$+ for a computer with an Intel GPU.
Rating: 7 Votes
21 months ago

There's little competition, so I can see them trying to get a premium price. Once it becomes the only rMBP I think we'll see the price drop to closer to this.


There's little competition in the 15" arena too, and yet the rMBP 15" managed to be priced very close to a 15" cMBP, in fact, the Retina display becomes a no-cost option if you configure both the 15" cMBP and the 15" rMBP to the same specs.

Yet, the 13" rMBP has the display as a 200$ option. A similarly configured 13" cMBP is 200$ cheaper.

There's no explanation for that, you can't spin this kind of stuff (well, you'll try...).
Rating: 5 Votes
21 months ago

The padding occurs accross the whole range, equally. Yes, it's greedy that there's such a premium for a 32 GB iPhone vs a 16 GB one when the only change is 10$ worth of Flash, but it's consistent accross the whole line-up. I'm not upset about the display, just find it ludicrous that it's a 0$ option on the 15" and a 200$ option the 13" basically.

If it was 200$ on both at least, it would make sense (I'm OCD, stuff needs to make sense).

----------



Yes. That was the right measure for me. Of course, there's no measure to make the 13" cMBP to 13" rMBP fair. None. You need to enter "market will bear-Apple PR land" to make it work, which should be left to people paid by Apple, not its users.

Stop playing "Apple PR person".


Sure there is. Is it worth it to me, the customer making the decision, to pay $200 more for the rMBP in order to get a machine that's nearly a pound lighter and has a better display? If yes, then it's a "fair" price to me. If not, then it isn't. Since I'm not in the market for a 15" notebook, Apple's relative pricing on the 15" models is irrelevant.


Look, KPOM is right. I find the price of the 13 rMBP too expensive to buy. Much as I would like one. And the price of the 15 inch version is irrelevant as it is a different product. Its only relevance is when you the buyer might decide to choose it instead as its mix of features and price is more appealing to you when you push the purchase button.

But just because I can't afford a 13 rMBP does that mean it is not a fair price? Not to me. But more generally, no. Because Apple is probably selling them as fast as they can make them. A sign that they are too expensive would be if they started piling up in warehouses unsold. That would be a sign that Apple has set the price too high.

If Apple didn't charge as high a price as it could for any of its products, it is not being fair to its shareholders. And there are many shareholders, while you, KnightWrx, are a constituency of one. Apple is not a charity.

In a market economy, a seller tries to get the highest price they can for a product, and the buyer tries to get the lowest price they can. The seller has their pricing right when they can make as much money as possible for every widget they are able to make.

In a non market economy, an entity (ruler, politburo, SMA, guild etc) determines the price of a product. All products end up looking the same, quality nosedives, and nobody could be arsed being innovative as it takes forever to get the design and price approved. They all copy the approved design. And the buyers end up in queues and waiting lists to buy crap at approved and mandated prices.
Rating: 5 Votes
21 months ago

There's little competition in the 15" arena too, and yet the rMBP 15" managed to be priced very close to a 15" cMBP, in fact, the Retina display becomes a no-cost option if you configure both the 15" cMBP and the 15" rMBP to the same specs.

Yet, the 13" rMBP has the display as a 200$ option. A similarly configured 13" cMBP is 200$ cheaper.

There's no explanation for that, you can't spin this kind of stuff (well, you'll try...).


The price is based on whatever the market will bear, not what someone on an Internet forum may or may not consider a "fair" price. My guess is that the 13" rMBP as it is today appeals to the pre-2010 Air crowd looking for a premium ultralight. Apple may also have been deliberately attempting to manage demand for the 13" because of yield issues. They have done massive price drops in the past (the 2010 MacBook Air comes to mind).

The 15" rMBP may have been priced a bit more "aggressively" since it is already a more expensive machine. Arguably it is the 15" cMBP that is more overpriced compared to the Windows competition.
Rating: 4 Votes
21 months ago
The refurb store is a good deal - I haven't bought a "new" Mac in a long, long time.
Rating: 4 Votes
21 months ago

Is the pixel density on the MBA higher than the standard (non retina) MBP?
If so, then a retina MBA would go beyond the 227ppi of the current PPI on the retina MBP!

Or maybe they are equal and I'm just getting excited :D


The 13" MBA has a 1440x900 screen, vs the 13" cMBP that has a 1280x800 screen.

However, I doubt a rMBA would have a 2880x1800 screen, they simply stick to the 2560x1600 screen.
Rating: 4 Votes

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