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Slimmer 13-Inch and 15-Inch MacBook Pros Reportedly in Production

Claims of redesigned MacBook Pro models continue to surface ahead of the official launch of Intel's Ivy Bridge chips, and Digitimes now reports that slimmer versions of the 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro are currently in production. Notably, the report claims that the MacBook Pro line will remain distinct from the MacBook Air line, with the new MacBook Pro models losing their optical drives but retaining more advanced specs than seen in the MacBook Air.
The MacBook Pro will no longer have an optical drive enabling thinner designs, the sources indicated. Despite the slim profile, the new devices will feature more advanced specs than the MacBook Air in terms of CPU performance and storage capacity, the sources said.

Production for the next-generation MacBook Pro has already begun with shipments to Apple kicking off in March, the sources noted. Monthly shipments will eventually climb to 900,000 units from the 100,000-150,000 units targeted initially, the sources said.
The report is very similar to one issued by Digitimes several weeks ago, but the new report offers the explicit claim that production on the new models has indeed begun.


For roughly a year we've been hearing word that Apple was working on a slimmer form factor for the MacBook Pro. Rumors have continued to pile up since that time, with some suggesting that Apple might gradually unify its notebook line with the release of a 15-inch "MacBook Air" in the near future being followed by a similar 17-inch model a few months later. But rumors have been split on whether Apple's larger notebooks would become true MacBook Airs or if they would retain the MacBook Pro name and more advanced specs while still adopting some of the MacBook Air design aesthetics.

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33 months ago

I can't stand the term 'retina display' its marketing BS from Apple at its best. At first they claimed it to be on par (or better) than typical print resolution (300dpi) and yet the term is still used even for the iPad when its well below the 300dpi mark.

I'd expect noobs in the public to be duped by the term, but not anyone on forums like this one, most of us here are pretty tech savvy.


I can't stand when people don't understand the math behind what apple terms as retina
Rating: 59 Votes
33 months ago

There will be only slim MacBookPro as the news said.

No more optical drives.

You dont need powerful GPU in a laptop. If you are a gamer, you play with iOS or Xbox perhaps even AppleTV will have some games.

Laptops are for adults. Not for gaming children.


Laptops are for adults. That's why I want it to come with inferior hardware so I can use it as a facebook machine. :rolleyes:
Rating: 53 Votes
33 months ago

Theres no math behind it, its purely a marketing term.


This sure looks like math to me.
Rating: 49 Votes
33 months ago
retina display, please ))
Rating: 42 Votes
33 months ago

This sure looks like math to me.


Not only math, but Comic Sans math.
Rating: 36 Votes
33 months ago

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kx3yltq8XDM

There you have it. Ivy Bridge can satisfy your gaming needs very well.

Children, try to realize already that it is impossible to put 200+ watts of real gaming power on to those tiny little laptops. How hard it can be to realize that?

Try to put 200w light bulb between your legs and keep it there for 2hrs and then come back telling how nice it feels and how high the FPS is


Stop calling people who want a dedicated graphics card children. You don't know what you talking about. First of all people do a lot of graphics work on laptops, using it as a desktop replacement rather than placing it on their legs. That doesn't work so well with the 17" for example.

Besides if an adult wants to play a PC game or two they are allowed to do so without your patronising tone.
Rating: 34 Votes
33 months ago

Theres no math behind it, its purely a marketing term.


There is math. It may be a marketing term but it is grounded in some truth. http://www.tuaw.com/2012/03/01/retina-display-macs-ipads-and-hidpi-doing-the-math/
Rating: 33 Votes
33 months ago
This is exactly what I want. A thinner Macbook Pro but with a dedicated graphics card. I would happily lose the disk drive for this. Retina display would be even more awesome.
Rating: 26 Votes
33 months ago

I can't stand the term 'retina display' its marketing BS from Apple at its best. At first they claimed it to be on par (or better) than typical print resolution (300dpi) and yet the term is still used even for the iPad when its well below the 300dpi mark.

I'd expect noobs in the public to be duped by the term, but not anyone on forums like this one, most of us here are pretty tech savvy.


I don't get this attitude. The term 'Retina Display' has a perfectly clear and verifiable meaning: a display that has a high enough PPI that, when viewed from a normal distance by someone with normal eyesight, individual pixels are not visible.

There's nothing marketing BS about this - it's merely a simple term that is easy to say which means something perfectly clear and, above all, testable with good solid mathematics.

The 300 PPI referred to the iPhone and compared it to a printed book. It was used as a way to clarify the meaning without complex mathematics. It has since been very neatly clarified on many occasions.

Why do you have such an issue with it?
Rating: 25 Votes
33 months ago

I can't stand the term 'retina display' its marketing BS from Apple at its best. At first they claimed it to be on par (or better) than typical print resolution (300dpi) and yet the term is still used even for the iPad when its well below the 300dpi mark.

I'd expect noobs in the public to be duped by the term, but not anyone on forums like this one, most of us here are pretty tech savvy.


For me the 'retina display' term means not just huge resolution, but making everything more clear to see while maintaining the same size of the UI etc.

For example, I cannot see pixels on 27'' iMac but the size of the text and buttons becomes too small for me.
Rating: 22 Votes

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