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Apple Wins One-Week Extension of Galaxy Tab Sales Ban in Australia

Just a day after an appeals court ruled to lift the sales ban on Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia, Bloomberg reports that Apple has won a one-week extension of the ban while the company attempts to appeal the decision.
High Court Justice John Dyson Heydon today extended the ban on the release of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 to Dec. 9. On that day, the country’s top court will consider Apple’s request for permission to appeal a lower court’s order issued earlier this week, which lifted a ban on the product that has been in place since mid-October.

“A stay for one week will cost Samsung, in effect, one week’s trade,” Heydon said, following a 90-minute hearing in Sydney. The extension will hurt Samsung “but not to extend the status quo is likely to be injurious to Apple,” he said.
Samsung had been planning to begin selling the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia today ahead of shipments into the country this weekend. The company was rushing to bring the device to market in time for the holiday shopping season, but has been forced to put those plans on hold for the time being.


Samsung argued that every day of delay is crucial as the clock continues ticking on the holiday shopping season, claiming that Apple has no basis for an appeal of the ruling, but the court is willing to keep sales on hold until it can hear Apple's side of the request for appeal.

Apple and Samsung are also battling over the Galaxy Tab in Germany, where Apple previously won an injunction barring the sale of three different models of the device. Samsung tweaked the design of its Galaxy Tab 10.1 several weeks ago in an attempt to skirt around the injunction, but Apple has filed a request to have the new Galaxy Tab 10.1N banned from sale as well, arguing that the new design still infringes on Apple's design for the iPad.

Top Rated Comments

(View all)

36 months ago

I can't comment on all the ins and outs of the law, but the case is pretty simple to me on a moral level. Apple makes money by taking huge risks. Launching the iPad was a tremendous risk. Tablets hadn't been doing much for ten years or so. They made millions of tablets, of a brand-new design, and took the risk that they would, like the Microsoft tablets, sell maybe 50,000 of them. Before that, the costs and risks of the iPhone. And the iPod. Sure, things that were similar to other products, but went so far beyond them that they were completely new things.

So Samsung and the others not only copy the iPad, in tiny details, copying many of the same icons, making sure that their tablet is almost identical to the iPad from a few feet away -- and that's okay? Copying, not taking risks, not putting together the end-to-end solutions, that's okay?

Sure, tablets didn't belong to Apple. But the way their tablet works, the interface, details of the icons -- Apple has shown people how to use their competitors. They can design much more quickly, because, heh, heh, the hard work is done. They don't have to write an OS, they've got one given to them. That looks an awful lot like the iPad.

Should Apple just keep on taking huge risks by bringing out new media for communication, and not complain when people copy? They did that after the Mac, when nasty ol' Steve wasn't around to use his hobnail boots on the copiers. And Microsoft ate their lunch, and by '91 had completely gone beyond Apple.

This gives all the motivation to the copiers, not to the innovators. The copiers make money even though they're lazy, and riding on the hard work of Cupertino. I don't think that's a good idea either. If Samsung goes for something new, works at it for three or four years, and out-innovates Apple, I'd say they should have a little while to make money from their invention, and not just get imitated to death.


Apple doesn't innovate, they popularize things. Samsung is the innovator.
Rating: 24 Votes
36 months ago
Why do you continue to post a Samsung logo that is disproportionately larger than the Apple logo? It looks ridiculous.
Rating: 23 Votes
36 months ago
The ban is unwarranted. Hopefully Apple will focus more on innovating and less on lawsuits.
Rating: 21 Votes
36 months ago

Why do you continue to post a Samsung logo that is disproportionately larger than the Apple logo? It looks ridiculous.


Because MacRumors is run by anti-Apple people. It's obvious given all the anti-Apple spin recently.
Rating: 20 Votes
36 months ago

Why do you continue to post a Samsung logo that is disproportionately larger than the Apple logo? It looks ridiculous.


Uh huh, how about I fixed that for you?


:rolleyes:
Rating: 19 Votes
36 months ago
Seriously, u two kids should stop fighting.... GO TO YOUR ROOMS!
Rating: 16 Votes
36 months ago

Why do you continue to post a Samsung logo that is disproportionately larger than the Apple logo? It looks ridiculous.

It appears that MacRumors is using equivalent logo image height, rather than square area.

Perhaps you would share your thoughts on what you might think to be a more equitable graphical logo presentation strategy. After all, you are a famous animated sleuthing canine.
Rating: 14 Votes
36 months ago

Why do you continue to post a Samsung logo that is disproportionately larger than the Apple logo? It looks ridiculous.


Because MacRumors is run by anti-Apple people. It's obvious given all the anti-Apple spin recently.


How do I call you two Geniuses out as trolls without getting voted off the island?
Rating: 14 Votes
36 months ago


Yes, something like iMac was the one and only all in one desktop computer back in 1998
Something like click/touch wheel on earlier generation of iPod.
Or something like Macbook Air when Sony hardly made it.

I'm sure Samsung's geniuses got into those ideas first :eek:

Apple surely sucks at innovation, right? :rolleyes:


Commodore PET, All-in-one computer, released in 1977.

Apple didn't design the click wheel, Synaptics did.

Sony Vaio x505, came out in 2004.
Rating: 11 Votes
36 months ago
I can't comment on all the ins and outs of the law, but the case is pretty simple to me on a moral level. Apple makes money by taking huge risks. Launching the iPad was a tremendous risk. Tablets hadn't been doing much for ten years or so. They made millions of tablets, of a brand-new design, and took the risk that they would, like the Microsoft tablets, sell maybe 50,000 of them. Before that, the costs and risks of the iPhone. And the iPod. Sure, things that were similar to other products, but went so far beyond them that they were completely new things.

So Samsung and the others not only copy the iPad, in tiny details, copying many of the same icons, making sure that their tablet is almost identical to the iPad from a few feet away -- and that's okay? Copying, not taking risks, not putting together the end-to-end solutions, that's okay?

Sure, tablets didn't belong to Apple. But the way their tablet works, the interface, details of the icons -- Apple has shown people how to use their competitors. They can design much more quickly, because, heh, heh, the hard work is done. They don't have to write an OS, they've got one given to them. That looks an awful lot like the iPad.

Should Apple just keep on taking huge risks by bringing out new media for communication, and not complain when people copy? They did that after the Mac, when nasty ol' Steve wasn't around to use his hobnail boots on the copiers. And Microsoft ate their lunch, and by '91 had completely gone beyond Apple.

This gives all the motivation to the copiers, not to the innovators. The copiers make money even though they're lazy, and riding on the hard work of Cupertino. I don't think that's a good idea either. If Samsung goes for something new, works at it for three or four years, and out-innovates Apple, I'd say they should have a little while to make money from their invention, and not just get imitated to death.
Rating: 11 Votes

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