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Lion-Optimized VMware Fusion 4 Debuts with Over 90 New Features


Virtualization firm VMware today announced the launch of its new Fusion 4 software to allow Mac users to run Windows and other operating systems virtualized alongside their native OS X operating systems. Optimized for OS X Lion, VMware Fusion 4 offers more than 90 new features, including the ability to run OS X Lion in a virtual machine as is now permitted by Apple's licensing.
With more than 90 new features and now optimized for today’s multi-core Macs and OS X Lion, key features in VMware Fusion 4 include:

- Built for OS X Lion – VMware Fusion 4 is designed to provide the best Windows experience on OS X Lion. Add Windows programs to Launchpad, experience them in Mission Control, view them in full screen or switch between them using Mac gestures.

- Better Performance and Faster Graphics – VMware Fusion 4 has been engineered to run Windows and Mac applications side-by-side with incredible speed and reliability. As a 64-bit Cocoa application, it is optimized for today’s multi-core Macs and delivers 3D graphics up to 2.5-times faster than previous versions of Fusion.

- Even More "Mac-like" Experience – VMware Fusion 4 enhances the way Windows programs run on a Mac. From the brand new settings menu to the redesigned virtual machine library and snapshot menu, users have even more Mac-like experiences when running Windows programs.

- Lion Squared – VMware Fusion 4 now supports OS X Lion in a virtual machine, allowing users to get more from their Mac by running OS X Lion, OS X Lion Server, Mac OS X Snow Leopard Server and Mac OS X Leopard Server in virtual machines.
VMware Fusion 4 is being offered at a promotional price of $49.99 until the the end of the year, after which time pricing will be set at $79.99. Users who purchased Fusion 3 on or after July 20th are eligible for a free upgrade to Fusion 4.

VMware's primary competitor in the virtualization market is Parallels, which released its own Lion-optimized version two weeks ago.

Top Rated Comments

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40 months ago
There's a discount code that knocks $10 off or £6.57 if you're in the UK - it should work for other currencies too.

Use FUSION20

For UK users it brings it down to £26.28 but there's VAT to go on top :(
Final UK price is £30.22
Rating: 14 Votes
40 months ago

I've never seen the reason for a VM running Windows on a Mac because the price is almost the same as just buying a low-end laptop with Windows 7.

For school, I needed windows and looked into Parallels and realized that for a few dollars more, I could just buy a separate Toshiba laptop. At least this allows for redundancy because if one computer breaks, I have another.

With a VM, if your Mac breaks, it breaks and that's it.


serious LOL

VMware 4 is about $50 i got win 7 for about the same, so you tell me where I can get a $100 laptop??
Rating: 7 Votes
40 months ago

Apparently, all those artists were using the wrong software platform. When you need Windows to run a mission critical application, then Linux is NOT the right choice for you. Whatever ran on those Linux boxes probably would also have run on Windows or could have been written for Windows in the first place. Except for trying hard to not use what everyone else in the world uses was probably the only motivation for going with Linux in the first place, and that alone is not a good enough reason.


Sigh. That's perhaps the most crazy statement I've read today.

When you have several hundred workstations, over a thousand HPC render machines - Windows tends to become a bit pricey. For VFX, Linux *is* the industry standard platform. 95% of the standard 3D modelling and 2D/3D compositing systems run on Linux. You must remember that SGI's IRIX was the dominant OS of that industry for a long time until commodity hardware and Linux took hold and replaced it. SGIs soon became bricks and doorstops.

Photoshop was one of the rare exceptions. Disney and a few other facilities contributed funds to the Wine project to develop it sufficiently to allow Photoshop to run well enough under Linux using the Wine system. Ultimately as hardware got cheaper, VMs were a better solution. There was no other application - open source or commercial that could match Photoshop's feature set. There are one or two other products that required Windows. These were used by a very small number of artists out of the several hundred coming and going through the facility.

You're doing NOBODY a favor by adding unnecessary complexity to a system. Having to instal a VM to run a mission critical application only shows that you made a poor choice. In my book, VMs are only acceptable on developer machines or when you need to make sure that a client system meets certain security and quality standards.


I work for a web hosting firm now. I'd say the majority of all production web sites and applications that we and our customers are running are running on virtual machines. I've been using VMs now in live production environments for years and I couldn't disagree more with your statements.

Martyn
Rating: 7 Votes
40 months ago

Why would you want to run a virtual machine running lion, if you're already running lion?


If you have to ask, you'll never know.
Rating: 6 Votes
40 months ago

The laptop I bought was $299 (no tax or shipping charge). Parallels was almost $200. Why pay to put Windows on an existing computer when you can have redundancy by having Windows on a separate laptop?


Virtual Box is 0$. Parallels is 90$.

Carrying only 1 computer with all the tools on it, and be able to interact with your data with software on any OS at the same time : Priceless.

Sorry you can't see the advantages in virtualizations.

Having a VM on a computer IS having two computers. I don't see how a VM with a second desktop operating system running in it actually makes life easier or less complex.


Let's see :

- Share data with cables or external media or a network - Check
- Copy/paste without having to use a network based clipboard server that might or might not work properly - Check
- Carrying only 1 physical computer around with all my software - Check again.

Yep, a VM is just like a 2nd computer, except for those little annoyances of actual owning 2 physical computers. :rolleyes:

I still firmly believe that when you need a VM with a second desktop OS in it, then you are basically walking with a crutch and your preferred host operating system was not the right choice for you.


My VM is for work. My computer insists on using proprietary technologies that only have Windows client. If it weren't for that, I wouldn't even need the VM. No, my work laptop is not an option (a huge hulking Dell Lattitude... I'm not carrying that POS around).
Rating: 6 Votes
40 months ago

In my book, VMs are only acceptable on developer machines or when you need to make sure that a client system meets certain security and quality standards.


Good thing we're not all you. :rolleyes:

A lot of movie editing/artwork is done on alternative platforms. Breaking Microsoft's stranglehold on the industry would help bolster innovation some. They have turned the PC industry into a stagnant cesspool. You're preaching stagnation and immobility. "Hey it works on Windows only, use Windows!". Yeah, way to spur innovation and development.
Rating: 6 Votes
40 months ago

I've never seen the reason for a VM running Windows on a Mac because the price is almost the same as just buying a low-end laptop with Windows 7.

For school, I needed windows and looked into Parallels and realized that for a few dollars more, I could just buy a separate Toshiba laptop. At least this allows for redundancy because if one computer breaks, I have another.

With a VM, if your Mac breaks, it breaks and that's it.


I would love to get this $170 toshiba laptop. Where do you get it? What kind of processor does it have?
Rating: 5 Votes
40 months ago

Why would you want to run a virtual machine running lion, if you're already running lion?


If you're asking that question, then you are not the target audience. Software and system developers and network engineers use this to have (cheap) test systems.
Rating: 5 Votes
40 months ago

The laptop I bought was $299 (no tax or shipping charge). Parallels was almost $200. Why pay to put Windows on an existing computer when you can have redundancy by having Windows on a separate laptop?

Everyone's needs are different. My need was to be able to run one program that was Windows-only, and figured it'd be good to get a separate machine and have Windows on its own piece of hardware.

It didn't seem right for me to pay almost $200 to put something on an existing computer bought in 2009, when I could have a backup computer in case anything happened.


Unless of course you need to regularly copy/paste between different operating systems, use them simultaneously, have limited space, are traveling (what a pain to travel with 2 laptops, 2 power cords, 4 batteries, etc.), or a million other reasons.

Man, I'm feeling old. All these short-sighted posts are making my eyes bleed.
Rating: 4 Votes
40 months ago


The funny thing is that you usually do not see average Windows users with an OS X or Linux VM; they can do everything they want with Windows, only OS X and Linux users usually have to have a VM with a second OS around to get their stuff done. That tells me more about OS X and Linux then it tells me about Windows.

And no, developers and geeks do NOT count as average users.

Are there any average users here at MR? Anyone?

It tells ME more about "average" users than it tells me anything about any OS or other software.[COLOR="#808080"]
Rating: 4 Votes

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