Tim Cook

Tim Cook is the CEO of Apple, having taken over the company in 2011 after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs fell ill with cancer. Prior to taking on the role of CEO, Cook, who joined Apple in 1998, served as Apple's SVP of Operations and Chief Operating Officer.

As Chief Operating Officer, Tim Cook managed worldwide operations, maintained reseller relationships, and kept a close eye on the company's supply chain, helping lead Apple to profitability.

Cook was a close friend and confidant of Steve Jobs, and he has kept Jobs' legacy alive by continuing to spur the company towards greater growth. Under Cook's reign, Apple has taken a strong stance on social issues, environmental protection, supply chain responsibility, and privacy rights.

Cook has overseen the development and launch of major products like the iPhone X, the Apple TV 4K, the iPad Pro, the Retina MacBook, and the revamped MacBook Pro. Apple is branching out under his leadership, exploring new avenues of innovation in areas like automobiles and augmented reality.

'Tim Cook' Articles

Apple CEO Tim Cook on Apple Music: 'We Worry About the Humanity Being Drained Out of Music'

In an extensive profile of Spotify founder and CEO Daniel Ek, Fast Company's Robert Safian recently sat down to speak for a few minutes with Apple CEO Tim Cook at Apple's headquarters in Cupertino, California. The topic was, of course, Spotify and Apple Music, two of the major players in the streaming music market and fierce competitors. Cook said that he looks to music as inspiration and motivation, a philosophy that's shared at Apple and has guided its focus on human-based music curation. "Music inspires, it motivates. It's also the thing at night that helps quiet me. I think it's better than any medicine," Cook said. While he declined to mention Spotify by name, Cook told Fast Company that Apple worries about streaming music losing the human touch, alluding to Spotify's more algorithmic approach to highlighting content.Cook's words embody Apple's longstanding critique of Spotify, which is that its algorithms are eroding music's spiritual role in our lives. Cook doesn't mention Spotify by name but says, "We worry about the humanity being drained out of music, about it becoming a bits-and-bytes kind of world instead of the art and craft."Despite launching just three years ago, Apple Music has 50 million paid subscribers and free trial members, with the company slowly catching up to Spotify. At last count, Spotify said that it had 83 million paid subscribers around the world. Apple has always had an edge over Spotify due to its massive 1.3 billion active installed base, and the fact that it's never needed to worry about profitability like Spotify has. "We're

Tim Cook Says Apple's $1 Trillion Value is a 'Significant Milestone' But 'Not the Most Important Measure of Success' in Employee Memo

Apple today reached a major milestone and became the first publicly listed U.S. company to reach a $1 trillion market capitalization. Following the news, Apple CEO Tim Cook, who did not comment publicly on the occasion, sent out a memo to employees, which was shared by Buzzfeed. In the memo, Cook said that while the valuation is a "significant milestone" that the company should be proud of, it's not the most important measure of Apple's success. He instead thanked employees and said that it's their hard work and refusal to settle for less that makes Apple great.Team, Today Apple passed a significant milestone. At our closing share price of $207.39, the stock market now values Apple at more than $1 trillion. While we have much to be proud of in this achievement, it's not the most important measure of our success. Financial returns are simply the result of Apple's innovation, putting our products and customers first, and always staying true to our values. It's you, our team, that makes Apple great and our success is due to your hard work, dedication and passion. I am deeply humbled by what you do, and it's the privilege of a lifetime to work alongside you. I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for all the late hours and extra trips, all the times you refuse to settle for anything less than excellence in our work together. Let's take this moment to thank our customers, our suppliers and business partners, the Apple developer community, our coworkers and all those who came before us at this remarkable company. Steve founded Apple on the belief that the

Apple CEO Tim Cook 'The Smartphone Market is Very Healthy'

During today's earnings call covering the third fiscal quarter of 2018, Apple CEO Tim Cook was questioned about the health of the smartphone market and the impact the company's choice to offer low-cost battery replacements might have on replacement cycles. In response, Cook said that he believes the smartphone market is "very healthy. "It's the best market to be in for someone in the business that we're in," said Cook. "Whether it grows one percent or two percent or five percent or six percent or 10 percent or shrinks one or two percent, it's a great market because it's just huge." iPhone revenue, Cook pointed out, was up 20 percent during the quarter compared to the third quarter of 2017, and Apple has seen mid-single digit growth averages on a weekly sales basis and double-digit growth on an ASP basis. Apple sold a total of 41.3 million iPhones during the quarter, bringing in revenue of nearly $30 billion. The iPhone X continued to be the most popular iPhone during the quarter. Cook said that he does believe replacement cycles are lengthening, and he says the "major catalyst" for that has been the fact that subsidized plans have become a much smaller percentage of total sales around the world. Apple's goal is to make great products to encourage customers to purchase new devices.I think for us, the thing we always have to do is come out with a really great, innovative product. I think iPhone X shows that when you deliver that, there's enough people out there that will like that, and it can be a really great business.In a separate response given to a question

Tim Cook to Speak at LOVELOUD Festival This Saturday

Apple CEO Tim Cook will speak at the second annual LOVELOUD festival at Rice Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City this Saturday. He will then introduce the band Imagine Dragons for a live performance on stage. LOVELOUD was founded in 2017 by Dan Reynolds, the lead singer of Imagine Dragons, to "help ignite the relevant and vital conversation of what it means to unconditionally love, understand, accept, and support LGBTQ+ youth in an effort to keep families together," according to the foundation's website. "Tim Cook joining us in Utah for LOVELOUD sends a clear message to LGBTQ youth that they have unlimited potential to achieve their dreams," said Reynolds. "Tim is an unwavering advocate for human rights and equality, and we're thrilled he'll be joining our powerful line-up of speakers and performers." Other guest speakers will include actor Alfonso Ribeiro, dancer Julianne Hough, Ellen Show star Kalen Allen, Tegan Quin of Tegan and Sara, Grammy-nominated songwriter Justin Tranter, musician WRABEL, singer Mary Lambert, comic Dana Goldberg, singer-songwriters VINCINT & Parson James, and more. Other performers will include Zedd, Linkin Park's Mike Shinoda, Grace Vanderwaal, and Neon Trees' Tyler Glenn. Nationally touring stand-up comedian Cameron Esposito will also perform and emcee the day's festivities. LOVELOUD tickets are available for purchase online, while AT&T will be live streaming the entire event on Twitter. The non-profit LOVELOUD Foundation says proceeds from this year's event will be donated to LGBTQ+ organizations, including Encircle, the Tegan

Apple Overhauls Leadership Page With Memoji Avatars for Execs Ahead of World Emoji Day

In celebration of World Emoji Day, which takes place tomorrow, Apple today updated its Apple Leadership site to introduce Memoji avatars for all of the key executives listed on the page. Tim Cook, Angela Ahrendts, Jony Ive, Eddy Cue, Craig Federighi, Luca Maestri, Phil Schiller, and the rest of the leadership team are now represented by Memojis. Memojis are an iPhone X feature coming in iOS 12. Similar to Animoji, Memoji are humanoid avatars that can be customized and personalized to look just like you with an array of options. You can choose skin color, hair color, hair style, eye color, eyebrows, nose, features like freckles and facial hair, accessories, and headwear when creating a Memoji. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Right now, Memoji, like Animoji, are limited to iPhone X, but future devices that include the Face ID camera system will also work with Animoji and Memoji, such as rumored iPad Pro models expected this fall. To celebrate World Emoji Day, Apple also highlighted the emojis we can expect to see in Unicode 11, which Apple plans to adopt later this year in either iOS 12 or an update to iOS 12. Upcoming emoji characters include cold face, party face, pleading face, peacock, kangaroo, parrot, and more, along with options for red hair, gray hair, and no

Apple CEO Tim Cook Talks Immigration, Human Rights, Privacy, Apple News and More in New Interview

Apple CEO Tim Cook this evening sat down for an interview with Fortune's Adam Lashinsky to discuss education, privacy, human rights, and immigration, and to explain why Apple takes a strong stance on these topics. According to Cook, Apple has always been about "changing the world" and that's not something that can happen "when you stay quiet," but there are no specific guidelines that Apple follows when deciding to speak out. We've always been about changing the world and it became clear to me some number of years ago that you don't do that by staying quiet on things that matter. For us, that's been the driving issue. There's no formula for when you speak and when you don't. The way I think about it... is it something Apple has a special expertise on? I don't want Apple to be another talking head. We should only speak when we have specific knowledge to bring to the subject. Do we have standing? Do we have a right to talk about this issue? It's not enough to be a large company to speak. I think about that, and so what that means for us is that we typically speak about education, privacy, human rights, immigration, and the environment because there's something we have where we can bring a point of view -- it may be discounted and most people may view it to be incorrect -- but nevertheless it is a point of view we can share.Cook went on to say that he doesn't think businesses should deal only in commercial things. "Business to me is nothing more than a collection of people and if people have values -- and I argue we should -- then by extension companies should have

Tim Cook Reaffirms Apple's Commitment to Ireland After Tax Dispute and Abandoned Data Center Plans

Just weeks after Apple abandoned its plans to build a $1 billion data center in Ireland, and amid a major Irish tax dispute with the European Commission, Apple CEO Tim Cook ensures his company remains committed to the country. In a recent interview with The Irish Times, Cook said Apple appreciated the support it received from the community who wanted the data center to be there, and reaffirmed Apple's commitment to Ireland as a whole."We loved the community there. Fortunately we had great support from the community who wanted us there. That's probably the biggest disappointment from our point of view; we felt we could have been in the community and made a lot of friends like we had in Cork and grown the relationship over time," Cook said. "But we understand and respect the process."Of course, not all local residents wanted the data center there, as concerns were raised about its potential effects on local animals, flooding on a neighboring golf course, and its close proximity to a shut-down nuclear power plant. Last October, Apple finally won approval for construction by the Irish High Court, after an appeal by two individuals against the decision was dismissed. However, the appellants decided to take their case to the country's Supreme Court, resulting in Apple abandoning its plans just before the hearing was to occur."Despite our best efforts, delays in the approval process have forced us to make other plans and we will not be able to move forward with the data centre," Apple said in a statement ahead of the Supreme Court heading on Thursday. "While

Tim Cook Visits Ireland as Apple Promotes Its Support of Over 1.7 Million Jobs in Europe

Apple CEO Tim Cook has arrived in Ireland, the latest destination on his European tour, which has included stops in Italy and the Netherlands. Apple CEO Tim Cook and Ireland's Taoiseach Leo Varadkar Leo Varadkar, the Taoiseach or Prime Minister of Ireland, tweeted that he had a "good meeting" with Cook in the capital of Dublin on Monday. It's unclear what was discussed, but it appears to have been a routine meeting. Good meeting with @tim_cook of @Apple this evening at ⁦@merrionstreet⁩. He’s on to Cork next to open an extension to the facility there pic.twitter.com/XRBTHzNC2c— Leo Varadkar (@campaignforleo) June 18, 2018 Cook has since headed to Cork, where Apple's European headquarters are located. There, he will formally announce an expansion of its Hollyhill campus. Apple says a new building will provide space for an additional 1,400 employees. Since 2012, Apple says it has invested nearly €220 million to develop the facility. Apple's campus in Cork Apple, on its recently updated Job Creation page in Europe, says it is Cork's "largest private employer" and "proud" that many of its employees in the area have worked at the company for decades. Apple's website notes that it "has been based in Cork for over 35 years and now directly employs 6,000 people throughout Ireland supporting all aspects of the business." The company also says its Irish team has "doubled in size over the last five years and includes over 80 different nationalities." Apple says Cork is home to its "only wholly owned manufacturing facility in the world. It provides configure-to-order

Apple CEO Tim Cook Meets iPhone Photographer in Amsterdam [Updated]

Apple CEO Tim Cook has been spending the weekend in Amsterdam, where he met historian Koen Kleijn and iPhone photographer Annet de Graaf. The Apple chief tweeted on Sunday about his appreciation for the city's "rich history and creative energy" during the meeting, which took place an open-top boat as it cruised along the capital's famous canals. Spending Sunday afternoon on the canals of Amsterdam with historian Koen Kleijn and iPhone photographer Annet de Graaf, “The Eye of Amsterdam” (IG: snapthecity). Love the rich history and creative energy of this city. Fijn om terug te zijn! 🇳🇱 pic.twitter.com/ieFFVguKWw— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) June 17, 2018 Kleijn has written or co-written several books on the history of Amsterdam and architecture in the Netherlands, while de Graaf has made a name for herself by capturing scenes of Amsterdam street life using her smartphone's camera. As de Graaf puts it on her website: The iPhone way of photography is pure. I can capture moments before they pass; I 'own' the Amsterdam streets with my iPhone for nearly 9 years now. I never use any other camera. Amsterdam is hiding stories, like a miraculous book, I simply reveal the pages with my lens.While we don't know what else is on Cook's agenda for the rest of the trip, a visit to the local Apple retail store is likely to be on the cards. We'll update this article when we know more. Update: Cook tweeted again on Monday, sharing details about his travels to The Netherlands where he met with developers from Lucky Kat

Tim Cook Reflects on Steve Jobs, Apple Watch Saving Lives, and Politics on The David Rubenstein Show

Bloomberg Television today published a full-length interview between Apple CEO Tim Cook and David Rubenstein, one of three billionaire founders of private equity firm Carlyle Group, following a brief preview last month. The conversation took place at Cook's alma mater Duke University on May 13. Cook reflected on a wide range of topics, including his education and career path, relationship with the late Steve Jobs, the Apple Watch's life-saving capabilities, politics, and social issues such as privacy, immigration, and equality. On the subject of Apple's earnings:Rubenstein: You’ve now been the CEO of Apple since about July of 2011. The earnings are up about 80 percent. So, have you ever thought you can’t do better than this, and maybe you should just say, “well, I’ve done a great job, and now I’m going to do something else with my life?” Cook: We view the stock price and revenue and profits as a result of doing things right on the innovation side, on the creativity side, focusing on the right products, treating customers like they’re jewels, and focusing on the user experience. I didn’t even know the numbers that you just quoted. It’s not even in my orbit, to be honest with you. Rubenstein: When you announce your quarterly earnings, analysts always say, “well they didn’t sell as much of this product as we thought they would,” and so does that bother you? Cook: It did at one time. It doesn’t anymore. We run Apple for the long term. It’s always struck me as bizarre that there’s a fixation on how many units are sold in a 90-day

Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'Privacy is a Fundamental Human Right'

Apple CEO Tim Cook this evening sat down for an exclusive interview with CNN's Laurie Segall, where he discussed everything from his iPhone usage habits to the importance of privacy. On the subject of device usage, Cook says that when he started using the new Screen Time feature built into iOS 12, he found he was spending too much time on the iPhone. "I found I was spending a lot more time than I should," he said. "I thought I was fairly disciplined about this. And I was wrong." Cook said that Apple is aiming to provide the tools to consumers to let them make their own decisions about device usage, and what's considered too much will vary from person to person. He said that while Apple wants customers to be "incredibly satisfied and empowered," it's not the goal to get customers to spend all of their time on iOS devices.I think the power is now shifted to the user and that has been What Apple has always been about - giving the power from the institution to the user. I am hopeful great things are going to happen from this.Cook reiterated his stance on privacy, and called it a "fundamental human right," as he has done in the past. He said it's "not healthy" to point a finger at companies like Facebook, and instead, we should be focusing on making the web an "unbelievable place."To me, and we feel this very deeply, we think privacy is a fundamental human right. So that is the angle that we look at it. Privacy from an American point of view is one of these key civil liberties that define what it is to be American.Cook said customers can trust Apple to be "on their

Apple CEO Tim Cook Shares Video of WWDC 2018 Scholarship Winners and Their Apps

In the months leading up to Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference each year, the company offers free WWDC scholarships to students and STEM organization members who don't have the $1,599 necessary to purchase a ticket to the event. When selected, the scholarship winners gain a free WWDC ticket, free lodging, and a free one year Apple developer membership. On Twitter today, Apple CEO Tim Cook celebrated these 350+ individuals with a quick video highlighting a few of the winners and their apps. In the video, Cook is seen discussing the apps with the scholarship winners, who also briefly describe the projects they're working on. Some apps include "Study Buddy Connection," which aims to streamline how tutors and students find one another, and "UV Safe," which sends out iOS notifications to apply sunscreen based on the UV index at your location. Accompanying the video, Cook's tweet says: "Nothing inspires us more than fresh ideas." Nothing inspires us more than fresh ideas. Meet a few of the 350+ talented #WWDC18 student scholarship winners! pic.twitter.com/XHRQdgCugE— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) June 4, 2018 WWDC 2018 kicks off tomorrow with a keynote at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California. As developers and other attendees arrived in California over the weekend, the first glimpses of conference swag appeared online, including a Levi's denim jacket and a collection of Apple-themed enamel pins. MacRumors will be providing all of the usual coverage of the conference, with real-time keynote updates found on our @MacRumo

Apple Commemorates Memorial Day With 'Remembrance Table' at Apple Park

This Monday, May 28 is Memorial Day in the United States, which commemorates individuals who died while serving in the armed forces. In an effort to honor the day, Apple CEO Tim Cook shared an image on Twitter this morning, explaining one way that the company will remember those we've lost in active military duty. This week at Apple Park, a Remembrance Table honors the men and women of our armed forces who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to their country. They will never be forgotten. #MemorialDay pic.twitter.com/dobmWcLZcN— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) May 25, 2018 In Apple's latest campus, Apple Park, employees have set up what Cook describes as a "Remembrance Table," which he says "honors the men and women of our armed forces." The Remembrance Table has been set up in Caffè Macs at Apple Park, sitting among tables where Apple employees gather to eat their lunch and other meals. For the federal holiday on Monday, Apple typically gives many of its corporate employees the day off, but some of its retail locations will remain open across the country. On Monday you'll be able to use Apple's Find a Store web tool to see if locations near you are open for the

Tim Cook Told Donald Trump China Tariffs Are 'Not the Right Approach' in Recent Meeting

Apple CEO Tim Cook conducted a private meeting with United States President Donald Trump on Wednesday, April 25, where the discussion was said to be focused "on trade." Following a recent interview with Bloomberg Television, Cook divulged more details about the meeting, mentioning that the two men discussed topics like recently imposed tariffs on China and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. In late March, Trump launched 25 percent tariffs on around $50 billion worth of Chinese products, citing a "tremendous intellectual property theft problem" in previous U.S./China trade relations. In the new interview, which happened on "The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations," Cook admitted previous trade policies had their drawbacks, but still held that Trump's tariffs are "not the right approach" in this situation. Apple CEO Tim Cook at the Executive Tech Summit at Trump Tower in December 2016 “It’s true, undoubtedly true, that not everyone has been advantaged from that -- in either country -- and we’ve got to work on that,” Cook said. “But I felt that tariffs were not the right approach there, and I showed him some more analytical kinds of things to demonstrate why.” The two also discussed the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which protects young immigrants who were brought into the U.S. as children from deportation. The Trump administration's decision to end DACA was blocked in January by a federal judge in San Francisco, and today representatives of the administration will attempt to convince the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Tim Cook Challenges Graduates to 'Think Different' in Duke University Commencement Address

Apple CEO Tim Cook today delivered the 2018 commencement address at his alma mater Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. Cook challenged students to "think different" rather than accept the status quo, and to leave the world better than they found it, by following in the footsteps of leaders like Steve Jobs, Robert F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King Jr. He also reflected on Apple's commitment to the environment, privacy, immigration, and gun control, supporting the Me Too movement against sexual harassment and students involved in the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. An excerpt from his speech:The pace at which progress is possible has accelerated dramatically. Aided by technology, every individual has the tools, potential, and reach to build a better world. That makes this the best time in history to be alive. Whatever you choose to do with your life, wherever your passion takes you, I urge you to take the power you have been given and use it for good. Aspire to leave this world better than you found it. I didn't always see life as clearly as I do today. But I've learned that the greatest challenge of life is knowing when to break with conventional wisdom. Don't just accept the world you inherit today. Don't just accept the status quo. No big challenge has ever been solved, and no lasting improvement has ever been achieved, unless people dare to try something different. Dare to think different. I was lucky to learn from someone who believed this deeply—someone who knew that changing the world starts with following a vision, not a path. He

Tim Cook: iPhone X is a 'Super Bowl Winner' Even if You Wanted It to Win 'By a Few More Points'

During today's earnings call covering the second fiscal quarter of 2018, Apple CEO declined to provide specific information on iPhone X sales, but he did suggest that the new device has been selling well, a major contrast to reports that have suggested poor sales and waning orders. According to Cook, customers chose the iPhone X more than any other iPhone "each and every week" of the March quarter, just as they did following the device's launch in the December quarter. Furthermore, Cook said that the iPhone X marks the first time its most expensive, flagship device has been its most popular device. Cook said that Apple was "surprised somewhat" that the iPhone X was the most popular device each week since its launch. "That's a powerful point," he said. iPhone X was also the most popular smartphone in China during the quarter. Since we split the iPhone line with the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in 2014, this is the first cycle we've ever had where the top of the line iPhone model has also been the most popular.Referencing customer satisfaction numbers for the iPhone X, Cook said that the device is a "beloved product." He went on to use a Super Bowl metaphor to describe iPhone X sales.I think it's one of those things where a team wins a Super Bowl. Maybe you want them to win with a few more points, but it's a Super Bowl winner and that's how we feel about it.Cook also discussed Apple's iPhone X pricing strategy, as he has done in the past. "We price for the value we're delivering," he said. "The iPhone X is the most innovative product on the market, and as I've said a

Apple CEO Tim Cook Attends State Dinner at White House and Will Meet With Trump on Wednesday

Apple CEO Tim Cook is attending the first state dinner of the Trump administration, which is honoring French president Emmanuel Macron, according to CNN. Cook is accompanied by Apple vice president of environment, policy and social initiatives Lisa Jackson. Guests at the dinner, which is taking place in the White House State Dining Room, will dine on a goat cheese gateau with tomato jam and buttermilk biscuit crumbles, a rack of spring lamb with Carolina Gold rice jambalaya and a burnt cipollini onion soubise, and a nectarine tart with crème fraîche ice cream. Image via Paul Bedard Other state dinner attendees, aside from President Donald Trump and Melania Trump along with President Macron and his wife, include Vice President Mike Pence, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Rupert Murdoch, Olympic curler John Shuster, hockey player Meghan Duggan, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, and CIA Director Mike Pompeo. Approximately 150 guests are attending. Cook has met with Trump several times in the past, attending a December 2016 tech summit and a meeting of the American Technology Council put together by Trump. Most recently, Cook was in Washington D.C. to meet with Senators Mark Warner (D-Virginia) and Richard Burr (R-North Carolina). Update: Cook will have a private meeting with Trump in the Oval Office at 1:45 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesday, according to a copy of his schedule obtained by Bloomberg and other media outlets. Update 2: Trump has now confirmed the meeting and says the

Apple Celebrates Turkish Children's Day With Self-Portraits Created Using iPad and Apple Pencil

Today is National Sovereignty and Children's Day in Turkey, an annual public holiday that takes place on April 23 in the country. As it has in years past, Apple is celebrating the holiday by sharing art that children have created using its products. Apple CEO Tim Cook highlighted a self-portrait created by 13-year-old Özgün Asya, who made the image on an iPad with Apple Pencil. It’s Children’s Day in Turkey! 🇹🇷 Thanks to 13-year-old Özgün Asya from Istanbul for this colorful self-portrait, created on iPad using Apple Pencil. pic.twitter.com/N5EzH11F1x— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) April 23, 2018 Over the past week, Apple's Turkish YouTube channel has been sharing a few videos also highlighting Children's Day, in a series called "My Portrait." The first video posted focused on Asya's self-portrait, and in it she explains that she drew herself with her favorite flower, the cherry blossom. Following the first video, Apple published six more short, 15-second clips where kids from Turkey explained the art that they created using iPad. Ali G. explained that he drew seven-and-a-half versions of himself due to his own age, Ece S. described her nature-focused portrait, and Defne A. showed off an image of her and her dog. In the most recent video, shared over the weekend, Apple combined all of the self portrait videos into one 30-second ad. The power of the iPad, the ease of use of Apple Pencil, and the unlimited creativity of children came together, and these extraordinary self-portraits came out. Apple's Children's Day videos showcase the latest 9.7-inch iPad, which

Tim Cook Insists Merging Mac and iPad Would Result in Compromises

Apple CEO Tim Cook remains against the idea of merging the Mac and iPad to create one unified hardware and software experience, according to a brief conversation he had at Apple's education event in Chicago last month. "We don't believe in sort of watering down one for the other," said Cook, speaking with The Sydney Morning Herald's Peter Wells. "One of the reasons that both of them are incredible is because we pushed them to do what they do well. And if you begin to merge the two … you begin to make trade offs and compromises." "So maybe the company would be more efficient at the end of the day, but that's not what it's about," he added. "It's about giving people things that they can then use to help them change the world or express their passion or express their creativity. So this merger thing that some folks are fixated on, I don't think that's what users want." Cook reiterated that he generally uses a Mac at work, and uses an iPad at home and for travel, but added "I use everything and I love everything." Apple's boss also revealed that an Apple IIc, released in 1984, was his first computer. "I first used it for a project, as a senior in engineering school, making an inventory control program or for a rental business that was close by," said Cook, who majored in industrial engineering at Auburn University. Cook's comments echo those he shared with the Irish Independent in 2015, when he said Apple is not interested in creating a "converged Mac and iPad." "What that would wind up doing, or what we're worried would happen, is that neither experience

Apple CEO Tim Cook on MSNBC Tonight at 5:00 PT/8:00 ET

Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to appear on MSNBC tonight at 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time or 8:00 p.m. Eastern time in an interview called "Revolution: Apple Changing the World" with MSNBC's Christopher Hayes and Recode's Kara Swisher. Much of what Tim Cook had to say was already covered in news stories earlier this week as the interview took place on March 28 and was covered by reporters who attended it live. It will be well worth watching in its entirety, however, as Cook had a lot to say during the segment. He covered favored topics like education and coding, but he also commented on the current political climate in the United States and talked extensively about the ongoing Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal Facebook is facing. Cook had some inflammatory words about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, for example, stating "I wouldn't be in this situation" when asked what he would have done in Zuckerberg's shoes.We could make a ton of money if we monetized our customers. If our customers were our product. We've elected not to do that. ...We're not going to traffic in your personal life.Cook also said Apple's customers are not the company's product, and that "well-crafted" regulation "is necessary" to prevent another Cambridge Analytica-style scandal.It's clear to me that something, some large profound change is needed... I'm personally not a big fan of regulation because sometimes regulation can have unexpected consequences to it, however I think this certain situation is so dire and has become so large, that probably some well-crafted regulation is necessary.Cook also comme