Tim Cook

Tim Cook is the CEO of Apple, having taken over the company in 2011 after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs fell ill with cancer. Prior to taking on the role of CEO, Cook, who joined Apple in 1998, served as Apple's SVP of Operations and Chief Operating Officer.

As Chief Operating Officer, Tim Cook managed worldwide operations, maintained reseller relationships, and kept a close eye on the company's supply chain, helping lead Apple to profitability.

Cook was a close friend and confidant of Steve Jobs, and he has kept Jobs' legacy alive by continuing to spur the company towards greater growth. Under Cook's reign, Apple has taken a strong stance on social issues, environmental protection, supply chain responsibility, and privacy rights.

Cook has overseen the development and launch of major products like the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, the Apple TV 4, the iPad Pro, the Retina MacBook, and the revamped MacBook Pro. Apple is branching out under his leadership, exploring new avenues of innovation in areas like automobiles and augmented reality.

'Tim Cook' Articles

Tim Cook Insists Merging Mac and iPad Would Result in Compromises

Apple CEO Tim Cook remains against the idea of merging the Mac and iPad to create one unified hardware and software experience, according to a brief conversation he had at Apple's education event in Chicago last month. "We don't believe in sort of watering down one for the other," said Cook, speaking with The Sydney Morning Herald's Peter Wells. "One of the reasons that both of them are incredible is because we pushed them to do what they do well. And if you begin to merge the two … you begin to make trade offs and compromises." "So maybe the company would be more efficient at the end of the day, but that's not what it's about," he added. "It's about giving people things that they can then use to help them change the world or express their passion or express their creativity. So this merger thing that some folks are fixated on, I don't think that's what users want." Cook reiterated that he generally uses a Mac at work, and uses an iPad at home and for travel, but added "I use everything and I love everything." Apple's boss also revealed that an Apple IIc, released in 1984, was his first computer. "I first used it for a project, as a senior in engineering school, making an inventory control program or for a rental business that was close by," said Cook, who majored in industrial engineering at Auburn University. Cook's comments echo those he shared with the Irish Independent in 2015, when he said Apple is not interested in creating a "converged Mac and iPad." "What that would wind up doing, or what we're worried would happen, is that neither experience

Apple CEO Tim Cook on MSNBC Tonight at 5:00 PT/8:00 ET

Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to appear on MSNBC tonight at 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time or 8:00 p.m. Eastern time in an interview called "Revolution: Apple Changing the World" with MSNBC's Christopher Hayes and Recode's Kara Swisher. Much of what Tim Cook had to say was already covered in news stories earlier this week as the interview took place on March 28 and was covered by reporters who attended it live. It will be well worth watching in its entirety, however, as Cook had a lot to say during the segment. He covered favored topics like education and coding, but he also commented on the current political climate in the United States and talked extensively about the ongoing Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal Facebook is facing. Cook had some inflammatory words about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, for example, stating "I wouldn't be in this situation" when asked what he would have done in Zuckerberg's shoes.We could make a ton of money if we monetized our customers. If our customers were our product. We've elected not to do that. ...We're not going to traffic in your personal life.Cook also said Apple's customers are not the company's product, and that "well-crafted" regulation "is necessary" to prevent another Cambridge Analytica-style scandal.It's clear to me that something, some large profound change is needed... I'm personally not a big fan of regulation because sometimes regulation can have unexpected consequences to it, however I think this certain situation is so dire and has become so large, that probably some well-crafted regulation is necessary.Cook also comme

Apple CEO Tim Cook Visits Alabama, Discusses MLK, Coding, and More in Student Symposium

Apple CEO Tim Cook visited Alabama today to attend a banquet hosted by the Birmingham Metro Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), where he received the 2018 Human Rights Award for advocacy for equality and safety in the workplace. Cook is an Alabama native who grew up in Robertsdale and attended Auburn University. The event was meant to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. King was the founding president of the SCLC in 1957. It’s an honor to be in Birmingham celebrating Dr. King’s life today. "Let us all hope that...in some not too distant tomorrow the radiant stars of love and brotherhood will shine over our great nation with all their scintillating beauty." pic.twitter.com/GN6T54hSqx— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) April 4, 2018 Ahead of the banquet, Cook also spoke at a student symposium at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham focusing on civil rights, education, and innovation, and details of what he had to say were shared by Alabama news site AL.com. On the topic of Martin Luther King Jr., Cook said his teachings "are timeless." "If you listen to him today, you feel like he is speaking about today," said Cook. He went on to explain that it's important to reflect on the work done by King, and the ways we can continue his legacy. Full of hope this morning, hearing from hundreds of Alabama students who are carrying Dr. King's legacy into the future. pic.twitter.com/NDPimMl10A— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) April 4, 2018 As for students who attended the symposium, Cook encouraged them to "change the status

Mark Zuckerberg Rebuts Tim Cook: Companies That Charge You More Don't Necessarily Care About You More

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has countered the argument that companies without an ad-supported business model are better off. "You know, I find that argument, that if you're not paying that somehow we can't care about you, to be extremely glib," said Zuckerberg, in an interview with Vox's Ezra Klein. "And not at all aligned with the truth." "The reality here is that if you want to build a service that helps connect everyone in the world, then there are a lot of people who can't afford to pay. And therefore, as with a lot of media, having an advertising-supported model is the only rational model that can support building this service to reach people." Last week, Apple CEO Tim Cook told Recode's Kara Swisher and MSNBC's Chris Hayes that his company "could make a ton of money if we monetized our customer," but added "we've elected not to do that." Apple's business model is primarily focused on selling products like iPhones and iPads to customers, rather than targeting users with advertisements based on their personal information. Facebook, on the other hand, is a free service that relies on ads for a significant portion of its revenue. Cook, who said Apple views privacy as a "human right," believes that Facebook shouldn't have the ability to collect as much information as it does. "The ability of anyone to know what you've been browsing about for years, who your contacts are, who their contacts are, things you like and dislike and every intimate detail of your life -- from my own point of view it shouldn't exist," said Cook, speaking at the annual China

Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'It's Not True That the iPhone is Not Made in the United States'

"It's not true that the iPhone is not made in the United States," Apple CEO Tim Cook said this morning in an interview with Recode's Kara Swisher and MSNBC's Chris Hayes in a response to criticism about its ties to China and other countries. "We have always made the parts here," Cook said. "People just look at where the final product is assembled." In a global world, he explained, manufacturing and assembly needs to be done in a variety of places. Image via Recode As Cook has said multiple times in the past, key iPhone components are manufactured in the United States. Display glass for the iPhone and iPad, made by U.S. manufacturer Corning, comes from Kentucky. The Face ID module for the iPhone X comes from Texas. Various chips for Apple devices are also built in the United States, according to Cook, as is equipment for manufacturing the iPhone. Components manufactured in the U.S. are shipped abroad, with devices assembled by suppliers like Foxconn and Pegatron in China. Cook said "political pressure" doesn't push Apple to add U.S. jobs, as it's something the company is already doing. As Cook often says, Apple could "only have been created in the United States," and Apple wants to give back. "Businesses should be more than just building revenues and profits," Cook said. "They should be building people.""We know that Apple could only have been created in the United States. We know that. This company would not have flourished in any other country in the world. We love this country. We are patriots. This is our country and we want to create as many jobs as we can

Tim Cook on What He Would Do in Mark Zuckerberg's Shoes: 'I Wouldn't Be in This Situation'

"I wouldn't be in this situation" Apple CEO Tim Cook told Recode's Kara Swisher in an interview where he was asked what he would do right now if he was Mark Zuckerberg. Cook went on to say that Facebook should have self regulated to prevent the massive data collection scandal it's now embroiled in, but the time for that has passed. "I do think that it is time for a set of people to think deeply about what can be done here." Image via Recode It's clear to me that something, some large profound change is needed... I'm personally not a big fan of regulation because sometimes regulation can have unexpected consequences to it, however I think this certain situation is so dire and has become so large, that probably some well-crafted regulation is necessary.Cook made the comments calling for regulation in a wide-ranging discussion with Swisher and MSNBC's Chris Hayes, covering topics from privacy to DACA to education, where he also again pointed out Apple's strong stance on privacy. As Cook has said many times in the past, "you" are not Apple's product and Apple does not make its money selling customer data. Cook says Apple sees privacy as a "human right, a civil liberty."We could make a ton of money if we monetized our customers. If our customers were our product. We've elected not to do that. ...We're not going to traffic in your personal life.Curation is important to Apple, and that's one of the ways Cook believes Facebook went wrong. "We curate," he said. "We don't want porn on our App Store. We don't want hate speech on our App Store." Apple, he says, looks at

Tim Cook Discusses Tech in Education, DACA, Facebook Scandal, and More in MSNBC Interview

Apple CEO Tim Cook sat down for an interview with Recode's Kara Swisher and MSNBC's Chris Hayes at Lane Tech College Prep today. The same high school hosted Apple's education-themed event on Tuesday. The full interview will be part of a TV special titled Revolution: Apple Changing the World that will air Friday, April 6 at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on MSNBC. However, reporters in attendance have shared highlights from the discussion on Twitter. Education Cook started by sharing his view that "education is the great equalizer of people." He said "if you look at many of the issues in society today, you can find the root in people who don't have access to quality education today." "We all have to get comfortable with notion that education is lifelong. Jobs will be cannibalized over time and replaced by others." While he believes that technology plays a key role in modern education, Cook noted that Apple doesn't believe technology can replace teachers. "Our products are tools," he said. "They help people — not replace people." "Teachers want to have technology to deliver their lessons. Most all teachers want a level of coding for their classes," said Cook. On the subject of Apple's new entry-level iPad, $299 with education pricing, Cook said that price point becomes "a very reasonable expenditure" since students, teachers, and school districts "don't have to buy a new iPad every year." Coding "I want America to be strong, first and foremost. And one base for that is that everyone needs to learn to code. Coding is a way to express yourself. It's a

Apple CEO Tim Cook Calls for Stronger Privacy Regulations Following 'Dire' Facebook Data Scandal

Apple CEO Tim Cook attended the annual China Development Forum in Beijing on Saturday, during which he called for stronger data privacy regulations following the "dire" Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal (via Bloomberg). Last week, it was revealed that the social network let Cambridge Analytica amass data on 50 million Facebook users without their consent, in an effort to target messages to voters during the 2016 presidential election. Photo of Tim Cook by Giulia Marchi via Bloomberg On the topic, Cook called for "well-crafted regulation" to protect users: “I think that this certain situation is so dire and has become so large that probably some well-crafted regulation is necessary,” Cook said after being asked if the use of data should be restricted in light of the Facebook incident. “The ability of anyone to know what you’ve been browsing about for years, who your contacts are, who their contacts are, things you like and dislike and every intimate detail of your life -- from my own point of view it shouldn’t exist.” Cook went on by stating that Apple has "worried for a number of years" that something like the recent Facebook data scandal might happen. "Unfortunately that prediction has come true more than once," he said. “We’ve worried for a number of years that people in many countries were giving up data probably without knowing fully what they were doing and that these detailed profiles that were being built of them, that one day something would occur and people would be incredibly offended by what had been done without them being aware of it,” he

Apple CEO Tim Cook to Appear on MSNBC on April 6

Apple CEO Tim Cook will sit down for an interview with Recode's Kara Swisher and MSNBC's Christopher Hayes on Friday, April 6 at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time, MSNBC announced today. The interview will be titled "Revolution: Apple Changing the World," with no other details about Cook's appearance at this time. JUST ANNOUNCED: @MSNBC & @voxmediainc's @Recode present "REVOLUTION: APPLE CHANGING THE WORLD" ft. @Apple CEO Tim Cook onstage with @karaswisher & @chrislhayes, airing Friday, April 6th at 8:00pm ET on @MSNBC. pic.twitter.com/GjgT5evSRu— MSNBCPR (@MSNBCPR) March 23, 2018 With no additional information available, it's not clear what Cook's discussion will include, but topics like privacy and data collection are likely to come up given the recent scandal with Facebook and Cambridge Analytica and concerns over the CLOUD Act. Cook may also spend time discussing the new educational initiatives Apple plans to introduce at its March 27 event, and we could get additional commentary on the consequences of Apple's power management features in older iPhones. Cook is often tight-lipped about new products, but he could potentially provide some veiled hints on what Apple's working on both this year and in the future. We'll have coverage of Cook's interview with Recode and MSNBC here on MacRumors on April

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin Visits Apple Park

United States Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin today visited Apple CEO Tim Cook at Apple Park, according to an image shared on Twitter by Mnuchin. In his tweet, Mnuchin thanked Tim Cook for Apple's commitment to invest $350 billion in the United States, which refers to a January announcement from Apple where the company said it planned to bolster the U.S. economy through job creation, existing investments, and new investments. Glad to visit @Apple HQ with @tim_cook. Thank you for your commitment to invest 350B in USA! #TaxCutsJobsAct pic.twitter.com/TasRA55smG— Steven Mnuchin (@stevenmnuchin1) March 16, 2018 Apple said it will contribute $55 billion to the economy in 2018 and $350 billion over the course of five years. At the same time, Apple also pledged to increase its Advanced Manufacturing Fund, designed to create jobs in the U.S. through investments in suppliers, to $5 billion, up from $1 billion. Mnuchin's visit to Apple Park comes just a few days after Tim Cook was spotted at Capitol Hill meeting with senators Mark Warren (D-VA) and Richard Burr (R-NC). Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Apple CEO Tim Cook Commemorates the Life of Stephen Hawking

Apple CEO Tim Cook has commemorated the life of theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, who died early Wednesday at the age of 76. "We will always be inspired by his life and ideas," he said on Twitter. Stephen Hawking via REX/Shutterstock “The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.” -Stephen Hawking. We will always be inspired by his life and ideas. RIP.— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) March 14, 2018 Hawking was a renowned scientist, cosmologist, astronomer, and mathematician. He authored several books, including his best-selling 1988 classic A Brief History of Time, which has sold more than 10 million copies. Hawking was diagnosed with the degenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at the age of 21. He was given just a few years to live, but battled the illness for more than five

Quick Takes: Tim Cook at Capitol Hill, Apple Hires Events Director From Golden State Warriors, and More

In addition to our standalone articles covering the latest Apple news and rumors at MacRumors, this Quick Takes column provides a bite-sized recap of other headlines about Apple and its competitors on weekdays. Tuesday, March 13 - Apple CEO Tim Cook visits Capitol Hill: Cook was spotted in the U.S. Capitol with senators Mark Warner (Democrat-Virginia) and Richard Burr (Republican-North Carolina). He reportedly had lunch with Warner. SPOTTED in the US Capitol: Senate Intel Cmte Chair @SenatorBurr, @MarkWarner & Apple CEO @tim_cook (Warner is getting lunch with Cook in the Senate dining room): pic.twitter.com/VwtnE4EQGS— Frank Thorp V (@frankthorp) March 13, 2018 Commentary: The report doesn't mention what was discussed, but it is fairly routine for Cook to make visits to Washington D.C. given his position. Warner is known to be a tech-savvy senator with concerns about cybersecurity. - Apple hires Golden State Warriors executive as events director: Apple has hired Gail Hunter, who was vice president of public affairs and event management of the NBA's Golden State Warriors team. Hunter will serve as Apple's director of events effective March 19, according to the team. Commentary: Hunter will join Apple just under three months prior to its annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June, the company's largest event of the year. The report doesn't mention what her responsibilities will be. - Apple supplier Wistron secures land to build new site in southern India: The contract manufacturer has received approval to build a new facility roughly 40 miles from

Tim Cook Shares Colorful 'Shot on iPhone' Photos From Hindu Festival of Holi

Apple CEO Tim Cook this morning tweeted a series of images that celebrate the Hindu festival of Holi, which began on March 1 and ended today, March 2. Cook shared three images from the India-based festival, taken by photographers Prashanth Viswanathan, Amit Mehra, and Ashish Parmar. Cook noted that each image was shot on the iPhone X. Stunning photos that capture the colorful festival of Holi by @prashvish in Nandgaon, @amitmehraphoto in Vrindavan and @ashishjparmar in Bengaluru, India #ShotoniPhone #iPhoneX pic.twitter.com/ykSNJDGvAl— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) March 2, 2018 Each image depicts people participating in Holi's colorful festivities, which mark the end of winter and beginning of spring. The festival is largely celebrated within India, but events expand beyond India into the United Kingdom, United States, South Africa, and more. Two of the images use Portrait Lighting on the iPhone X, a feature that provides several unique lighting effects as a way to emphasize part of an image. Both of the pictures from the Holi festivities use the "Stage Light" effect, which spotlights a subject against a dark background. Check out Cook's tweet to see all of the pictures shared from

Tim Cook Says Apple is Always Focused on 'Products and People' Over Wall Street Expectations

Fast Company today published an interview with Tim Cook after naming Apple the world's most innovative company yesterday. Image Credit: Fast Company/Ioulex Photography Apple's CEO primarily reflected on the iPhone maker's culture and approach that has led to products such as the iPhone X, Apple Watch, AirPods, and HomePod, and as to be expected, he talked up the company he runs. Cook said Apple's focus is always on "products and people," for example, rather than the company's earnings results or stock price.Fast Company: What makes a good year for Apple? Is it the new hit products? The stock price? Tim Cook: Stock price is a result, not an achievement by itself. For me, it's about products and people. Did we make the best product, and did we enrich people's lives? If you’re doing both of those things–and obviously those things are incredibly connected because one leads to the other—then you have a good year.Apple is "not in it for the money" with Apple Music, for instance, according to Cook, who says the streaming music service is more about ensuring that artists are funded in order to have a "great creative community."Fast Company: Music has always been part of the Apple brand. Apple Music has had a lot of user growth, but streaming is not a major money­maker. Do you think about streaming as a potential stand-alone profit area, or is it important for other reasons? Tim Cook: […] Music is a service that we think our users want us to provide. It's a service that we worry about the humanity being drained out of. We worry about it becoming a bits-and-bytes kind

Apple CEO Tim Cook: Hardware and Software Integration Will Set HomePod Apart From Competitors

Apple CEO Tim Cook is spending some time in Canada this week, and yesterday he attended a hockey game and visited the Eaton Centre Apple Store in Toronto. Cook today stopped by the offices of Canadian e-commerce platform Shopify, where he spoke to the Financial Post about augmented reality apps and the HomePod. On the topic of the HomePod, Cook said that Apple's deep integration between hardware and software will help to differentiate the smart speaker from competing products like Amazon's Alexa and the Google Home."Competition makes all of us better and I welcome it," Cook said. "(But) if you are both trying to license something and compete with your licensees, this is a difficult model and it remains to be seen if it can be successful or not."Cook also said a quality, "very immersive audio experience" was one thing missing from the smart speaker market, which Apple is aiming to fix. "Music deserves that kind of quality as opposed to some kind of squeaky sound," he said. The HomePod, which, at $349 in the United States is more expensive than competing products, features a 7 tweeter array, an Apple-designed 4-inch upward-facing woofer, and spatial awareness, all of which is designed to provide the best possible sound. During his interview with the Financial Post, Cook also spoke about augmented reality, a topic he's covered many times in the past. Cook said AR is "the most profound technology of the future" that's able to amplify human experience instead of substitute it. Cook said developers across Canada are adopting AR at a "very fast rate" and that he

Tim Cook Discusses Apple's Partnership With Malala Fund to Support Girls' Education While in Canada

Apple today announced that it has teamed up with Malala Fund to become the fund's first Laureate partner, providing Malala Fund with the support it needs to double the number of grants it provides and expand into India and Latin America. The Malala Fund, led by Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai, champions every girl's right to 12 years of free, safe, quality education. Following the announcement, Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke with iMore in a short interview in Toronto where he shared some insight into how Apple and the Malala Fund came to form a partnership. Cook says that after meeting Malala, it became clear that their values aligned. "Not only the Malala Fund and Apple, but our personal values as well," Cook said."One, equality is at the core of our belief and values and, two, that education is the great equalizer of people. If you believe both of those, it's not an extension at all to say, 'how do we help Malala achieve her vision of educating 130-million young girls around the world?'"Cook said that he loves the Malala Fund's focus on secondary education, because in some places around the world, girls receive an education until grade 6 or grade 7, and then their schooling stops. "This isn't right," said Cook. "It doesn't maximize potential and it doesn't treat people with dignity or respect." With Apple's help, the Malala Fund will double the grants it provides through its Gulmakai Network (which supports educational programs in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Nigeria) and extend funding programs to Latin America and India, offering

Apple CEO Tim Cook Learned to Code in College

Under the leadership of Apple CEO Tim Cook, Apple has spearheaded an "Everyone Can Code" initiative designed to introduce coding curriculum into elementary schools, high schools, and colleges, so kids and adults of all ages can learn to code. Apple CEO Tim Cook always speaks passionately about the importance of teaching coding to children of all ages, and last week in an interview, he even said that if you have to make a choice, it's more important to learn to code than to learn a foreign language. Cook's recent comments spurred MacRumors reader El-ad to ask Cook about his own coding experience in an email, which Cook responded to. Cook says he learned to code in college because coding wasn't offered at the high school he attended.El-ad, I learned in college. No classes exist in the high school I attended. I'm happy this is now changing. TimThat Cook can code may not be immediately obvious as he ran Apple's worldwide operations before becoming CEO of the company, but it's no surprise. Before going to Duke University's Fuqua School of Business for his MBA, Cook graduated from Alabama's Auburn University with a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering, a major that requires a programming background. In October of 2017, Cook shared additional details on his coding experience in an interview with The Sun. Back when he was attending Auburn University, Cook built a system to improve the traffic lights near the university. He aimed to optimize traffic to reduce wait times while maintaining the safety of the lights. His work was a success and it was implemented

Tim Cook Makes First Trip to Canada as Apple CEO With Surprise Visit to Toronto [Updated]

Tim Cook made his first appearance in Canada today as the head of Apple with an unannounced visit to Toronto this morning. Just before noon local time, Cook made a surprise visit to the company's retail store at the Eaton Centre shopping mall, reports The Globe and Mail. Cook was pictured alongside young students attending an Apple Field Trip, an in-store initiative that introduces kids to coding, podcasting, and other creative skills. @tim_cook is at the Toronto Eaton centre Apple store! pic.twitter.com/3rQAKmSChV— Anthony Neal Macri (@AnthonyMacriSEO) January 22, 2018 Cook's stop in Toronto follows a trip to Harlow College near London, England on Friday, in line with Apple's announcement that its Everyone Can Code initiative has recently expanded to 70 colleges and universities across Europe. Last week, Cook also visited Reno, where Apple broke ground on a new data center. Cook has served as Apple's CEO since August 24, 2011, after the late Steve Jobs resigned from the position for a final time. Update: After visiting the Eaton Centre Apple Store while in Toronto, Tim Cook attended a Maple Leafs game with hockey analyst and former player Nick Kypreos. Thanks @MapleLeafs and @RealKyper for an exciting night of hockey! Tough Loss. #GoLeafsGo / Merci aux @MapleLeafs et à @RealKyper pour une soirée de hockey enlevante! Ce n’est que partie remise. #GoLeafsGo pic.twitter.com/tYdqQH1RAo— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) January 23, 2018 Via: iPhone in Canada

Tim Cook to Deliver 2018 Commencement Address at Duke University on May 13

Duke University today announced that Apple CEO Tim Cook will deliver the 2018 commencement address on May 13 in Wallace Wade Stadium on the university's campus in Durham, North Carolina. Cook earned an MBA from Duke's Fuqua School of Business in 1988 and has served on the university's Board of Trustees since 2015."I am absolutely delighted that Tim Cook will be returning to campus as this spring's commencement speaker," said [Duke President Vincent E.] Price. "Throughout his career, Tim has embodied Duke's values of innovation and service to society, whether through his contributions to Apple's groundbreaking technology or his advocacy for social justice. I can imagine no better person, and no bigger Duke fan, to inspire the Class of 2018."As part of today's announcement, Duke included a brief video revealing its commencement speaker selection using Animoji, with Cook making an appearance as the fox. "From the first day I walked onto campus more than 30 years ago, Duke has been a source of inspiration and pride for me -- both professionally and through the deep personal friendships that have endured to this day," said Cook. "It's my honor to be returning to salute the class of 2018 as they begin the next chapter of their lives as Duke graduates."In addition to this year's upcoming appearance at Duke, Cook has delivered a number of other commencement addresses in recent years, including at his undergraduate alma mater Auburn University in 2010, at George Washington University in 2015, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology last year.

Apple CEO Tim Cook Discusses Overusing Technology in New Interview

Apple this morning announced the expansion of its "Everyone Can Code" initiative to 70 educational institutions across Europe, and following the announcement, Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke at Harlow College in Essex, one of the schools that will adopt the new curriculum. The Guardian shared several of Cook's comments, which covered overuse of technology and boundaries for children. Cook said he believes there are concepts that can't be taught using technology, and in many courses, technology shouldn't dominate.“I don’t believe in overuse [of technology]. I’m not a person that says we’ve achieved success if you’re using it all the time,” he said. “I don’t subscribe to that at all.” Even in computer-aided courses, such as graphic design, technology should not dominate, he said. “There are are still concepts that you want to talk about and understand. In a course on literature, do I think you should use technology a lot? Probably not.”According to Cook, Apple cares about children out of the classroom, a topic that's notable as Apple investors recently urged Apple to do more to protect children from smartphone addiction. Apple in early January said in a statement that it thinks deeply about how its products are used and the impact they have on people, including children. Apple takes its responsibility to protect children "very seriously," and has promised more robust parental controls for iOS devices in the future. Though he does not have children of his own, Cook says in his own personal life, he "put some boundaries" on his nephew. "There here are some things