Tim Cook

Tim Cook is the CEO of Apple, having taken over the company in 2011 after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs fell ill with cancer. Prior to taking on the role of CEO, Cook, who joined Apple in 1998, served as Apple's SVP of Operations and Chief Operating Officer.

As Chief Operating Officer, Tim Cook managed worldwide operations, maintained reseller relationships, and kept a close eye on the company's supply chain, helping lead Apple to profitability.

Cook was a close friend and confidant of Steve Jobs, and he has kept Jobs' legacy alive by continuing to spur the company towards greater growth. Under Cook's reign, Apple has taken a strong stance on social issues, environmental protection, supply chain responsibility, and privacy rights.

Cook has overseen the development and launch of major products like the iPhone X, the Apple TV 4K, the iPad Pro, the Retina MacBook, and the revamped MacBook Pro. Apple is branching out under his leadership, exploring new avenues of innovation in areas like automobiles and augmented reality.

'Tim Cook' Articles

Steve Jobs Criticized Tim Cook as 'Not a Product Person,' Says Biographer Walter Isaacson

"Steve Jobs" biographer Walter Isaacson was on Squawk Box this week, and in an interview he mentioned that he "softened" parts of the book when it came to certain Jobs quotes (via CNBC). Particularly, Jobs was said to have criticized current Apple CEO Tim Cook for not being a "product person." According to Isaacson, "Steve says how Tim Cook can do everything, and then he looked at me and said, 'Tim's not a product person.'" Isaacson said that he wanted to soften certain things that he thought were too harsh in his biography of Steve Jobs. The book first launched in October 2011, just 19 days after Jobs died from pancreatic cancer. “Sometimes when Steve was in pain ... and he was angry, he would say more things that [Cook] was not a product person,” recalled Isaacson. “I felt I would put in the specific things that were relevant to the reader but not the complaints.” Cook was also mentioned in a recent piece by The Wall Street Journal, which focused on Jony Ive, who reportedly became "dispirited" because of Cook's lack of interest in the product development process. Ive announced that he will leave Apple later this year and start his own design studio, with Apple as one of its primary clients. Isaacson has been critical of Apple as a whole in the past, believing in 2014 that Amazon and Google had overtaken Apple to become the most innovative technology companies of the modern day. At the time, he specifically referenced virtual assistants as a space where Apple needed improvement. Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs went on to be the basis for

Apple CEO Tim Cook to Receive 'Champion Award' for His Ongoing Commitment to LGBTQ Rights

GLSEN, an organization dedicated to creating safe and inclusive K-12 schools for LGBTQ youth, has announced that Apple CEO Tim Cook will receive its "Champion Award" for his ongoing commitment to fighting for LGBTQ rights. The awards ceremony will take place on October 25 at the Beverly Wilshire hotel in Los Angeles. Cook provided the following statement:I am grateful to GLSEN for this honor and for all their work to ensure the LGBTQ community is treated with dignity and respect. At Apple, our commitment to inclusion helps us do our best work, each and every day. Innovation depends on openness to new ideas, a culture of curiosity and a climate free from shame and stigma — that's true not only true for Apple, I believe it's true for everyone.Since becoming CEO, Cook has strongly pushed for inclusion and diversity, which Apple refers to as its "greatest strength" on its website. "To create products that serve everyone, we believe in including everyone." Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Tim Cook Talks Privacy, Steve Jobs, and the 'Difference Between Preparation and Readiness' in Stanford Commencement Address

Apple CEO Tim Cook delivered the commencement address at Stanford University today, sharing his thoughts on privacy, the need to always "be a builder," and how the loss of Steve Jobs made him learn the "real, visceral difference between preparation and readiness." On the subject of privacy, Cook acknowledged that so many of our modern technological inventions have come out of Silicon Valley, but that recent years have seen "a less noble innovation: the belief that you can claim credit without accepting responsibility." Cook stressed the importance of not accepting that we must give up privacy in order to enjoy advances in technology, arguing that there's much more at stake than just our data.If we accept as normal and unavoidable that everything in our lives can be aggregated, sold, or even leaked in the event of a hack, then we lose so much more than data. We lose the freedom to be human. Think about what’s at stake. Everything you write, everything you say, every topic of curiosity, every stray thought, every impulsive purchase, every moment of frustration or weakness, every gripe or complaint, every secret shared in confidence. In a world without digital privacy, even if you have done nothing wrong other than think differently, you begin to censor yourself. Not entirely at first. Just a little, bit by bit. To risk less, to hope less, to imagine less, to dare less, to create less, to try less, to talk less, to think less. The chilling effect of digital surveillance is profound, and it touches everything. What a small, unimaginative world we would

Tim Cook Says Apple 'Should be Scrutinized' But Disputes Claims Company is a Monopoly

Apple CEO Tim Cook believes that when it comes to big business, scrutiny is a good thing, but he has denied claims that Apple is a monopoly. In an extended interview with CBS News, Cook said that because of Apple's size he thought it was "fair" to scrutinize its business practices, but the CEO pushed back hard against claims that the company had a dominant position in any market. Apple has recently become the target of regulator inquiries and class action lawsuits that have variously questioned its business practices. In the United States, for example, the Supreme Court recently ruled that a class action accusing Apple of operating an App Store monopoly can proceed to trial in a lower court. Asked about Elizabeth Warren's presidential campaign and her position that Apple should break up its App Store and other parts of its business, Cook said: I strongly disagree with that. I think some people would argue, if you are selling a good, then you can't have a product that competes with that good. And I-- I think that's part of what is being argued there. But that-- that's an argument that takes you down the path that, Walmart shouldn't be stocking alternative or house brand. And so this is decades of-- of-- U.S. law here. But I think scrutiny is good, and we'll tell our story to anybody that we need to or that-- that wants to hear it. I-- I feel very confident in-- in our position.Cook went on to underline the company's user-centric position and claimed that when it comes to privacy and fake news, "we're on the user's side," which is why it curates content on its

Apple CEO Tim Cook Promotes New Statue of Liberty Augmented Reality App

Apple CEO Tim Cook this afternoon encouraged his Twitter followers to check out the new Statue of Liberty augmented reality app for iOS, which was conceptualized by Diane von Fürstenberg to celebrate the launch of the Statue of Liberty Museum this Thursday. According to the Vogue article on the app, it was created by the Statue of Liberty Foundation and Yap Studios. Its creation took more than a year of scanning and photography, and it offers up a time-lapse view from the statue's eyes, a look inside of it, and a time-lapse of how the color changed over time. The main feature, though, is several 3D models of the Statue of Liberty that can be projected into your own home. There's a full-size model plus close-ups of the torch and the Statue's foot. Try it! https://t.co/75awGrX1Uo— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) May 14, 2019 The app is designed to help visitors to the museum and those who are viewing from home understand the construction and the detail of the Statue of Liberty, thanks to augmented reality. Apple was one of the donors of the project after Diane von Fürstenberg connected Tim Cook and the Statue of Liberty Foundation. "I met Tim Cook from Apple, and discovered first of all that he had never been to Liberty Island, so I arranged for him to go," DvF revealed. "Not even knowing what I was talking about, I said, 'Wouldn't it be wonderful to give people an Apple experience when they go on the Island?' I met the people who do apps and we started, not knowing where it would all end up. The foundation created this app

Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'I Don't Think a Four-Year Degree is Necessary to Be Proficient at Coding'

Earlier this week, Apple CEO Tim Cook visited an Apple Store in Orlando, Florida to meet with 16-year-old Liam Rosenfeld, one of 350 scholarship winners who will be attending Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference next month. Apple CEO Tim Cook, left, and WWDC 2019 scholar Liam Rosenfeld via TechCrunch Echoing comments he shared with the Orlando Sentinel, Cook told TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino that it is "pretty impressive" what Rosenfeld is accomplishing with code at such a young age, serving as a perfect example of why he believes coding education should begin in the early grades of school."I don't think a four year degree is necessary to be proficient at coding" says Cook. "I think that's an old, traditional view. What we found out is that if we can get coding in in the early grades and have a progression of difficulty over the tenure of somebody's high school years, by the time you graduate kids like Liam, as an example of this, they're already writing apps that could be put on the App Store."Cook made similar comments during an American Workforce Policy Advisory Board meeting at the White House earlier this year. While in Florida, Cook attended a conference that saw SAP and Apple announce an expanded partnership focused on new enterprise apps taking advantage of technologies like machine learning and augmented reality. Despite all of the technological advancements in recent years, Cook told Panzarino that many businesses have not "changed a whole lot" and are "still using very old technology." With more solutions like those from SAP

Apple CEO Tim Cook Visits Florida Apple Store and Meets WWDC Scholar

Apple CEO Tim Cook today visited the Mall at Millenia Apple Store in Orlando, Florida, where he met up with 16-year-old Liam Rosenfeld, one of the WWDC scholars who will be attending Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference this June. Cook was in Florida for an event that saw SAP and Apple announce an expanded partnership focused on new enterprise apps taking advantage of technologies like machine learning and AR. Cook apparently visited the Apple Store after the conference. According to the Orlando Sentinel, Cook had a short chat with Rosenfeld, who called the meeting "an amazing surprise." Tim Cook at the Millenia Apple Store, via Matthew Panzarino Rosenfeld runs a coding club at his high school, and he's created an app that converts images into ASCII, plus he has two additional apps in the works. Cook said that the teenager had impressed him."He has a quality that I think is on a short list of characteristics that drive success, and that is curiosity," said Cook, after talking with Liam about the creation of the coding club.Cook went on to say that WWDC scholarships provide Apple with a way to contribute to the growing need for a tech workforce."You need public, private, non-governmental organizations working together because this is not a trivial transformation that needs to happen here," he said. "We have an obligation. We are fortunate to have had some success."Apple offered 350 scholarships to students and STEM organization members for WWDC 2019. Each scholarship includes a free WWDC ticket, free accommodations in San Jose, California, near the

Apple CEO Tim Cook on Privacy: 'We Very Much Are on Your Side'

At the Berkshire Hathaway shareholder conference this weekend, Apple CEO Tim Cook sat down for an interview with CNBC's Becky Quick, and that interview aired this morning on Squawk Box. During the discussion, Cook covered topics like Warren Buffett's Apple investments, Apple's company mission, how Apple runs, internal debate topics, privacy, acquisitions, and more. Cook said that when he heard that Warren Buffett invested in Apple stock, he said he thought to himself "Wow, this is really cool." An investment from "the ultimate long-term investor" is an "honor and a privilege," Cook said. "I mean, wow, it's Warren Buffett is investing the company. And yeah, so, it felt great." Buffett's decision to invest in Apple meant that he viewed it as a consumer company, not a technology company because Buffett doesn't invest in tech companies he doesn't understand. Cook says that while Apple is in the tech industry, the consumer is the company's focus. "We think technology should be in the background, not the foreground," said Cook. Cook went on to reiterate something that he's said many times before - Apple's goal is to enrich people's lives.Our mission is to make the best products in the world in those areas which we choose to participate that enrich people's lives. And so, if we can't make the best product, we don't go in. If we can make a great product but it doesn't help anybody, it doesn't enrich their life, then we're not going to go into that either. And so that's a pretty narrow funnel then because you're working on a few things. And we know in order to do them at

Apple CEO Tim Cook Discusses Apple's Revamped Carnegie Library Store in Washington, D.C.

Apple is set to open a new retail store at the revamped Carnegie Library in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, May 11, and ahead of the grand opening, Apple CEO Tim Cook and Apple retail leader Deirdre O'Brien did an interview with The Washington Post to discuss the new flagship location. Work on the Carnegie Library Apple Store kicked off two years ago, and Apple has spent an estimated $30 million on the project. $7 million of that went towards facade restoration, $300,000 went to restoring the stair wells, and $2 million was spent on landscaping and site work. Apple is also paying $700,000 per year for the next 10 years to lease the space. According to Cook, restoring Carnegie Library to its original design standards became the "most historic, ambitious restoration by far, in the world." Apple believes projects like this help showcase "Today at Apple" services and classes, though the company's aim is to get customers to further associate Apple with creativity."Our roots are in education and creativity," Cook said. "You think about where the company started from and Steve and the team at the time were very focused on providing people tools that allowed them to do incredible things." "We've been serving the creative community as a company since the founding of the company, and the truth is everyone should be a part of the creative community," Cook added, "so this is our way to democratize it."Like other remodeled Apple Stores, Carnegie Library will use the town square design with dedicated sections for the Genius Grove, Today at Apple sessions, and shopping for

Apple CEO Tim Cook Discusses Tech Regulation, Privacy, Education, Health, and More at TIME 100 Summit

Apple CEO Tim Cook sat down with former TIME managing editor Nancy Gibbs at the first-ever TIME 100 Summit in New York City today to discuss the need for regulation in the tech industry, privacy, education, health, and more. We've paraphrased some of Cook's comments from the interview: Cook on Apple's values:It's been an interesting time period to be a CEO. I've always deeply felt that people should have values. A corporation is nothing more than a collection of people, so by extension a corporation should have values. It's not unique to Apple. We've always had a unique set of values important to us. Part of that is how we treat the environment. Advocating for high-quality education. Privacy. I tend to think as I look at the world today, the issues that we face cannot be addressed solely by government. We cannot be looking to the government to solve all the problems. I think it takes the public sector, the private sector, and academia working together to solve these problems. Climate change is not going to be solved by government -- as just one example. We've readily stepped up and participated in the conversations because we think how we do is important as what we do.And:I would hope that every CEO stands up and represents its employees. This will upset some people. I try not to get wrapped up in a pretzel about who we upset. … In the end, we'll be judged for "did we stand up for what we believe in?" I think people still appreciate that, even when they disagree. We've taken some unpopular opinions, I recognize that, but we do so believing deeply that they are

Will, Jaden and Jada Smith Visit Apple Park for Environmental Discussion

Will Smith, his wife Jada Smith, and his son Jaden Smith today visited Apple Park to discuss the environment and Jaden's Just Water company, according to a tweet Apple CEO Tim Cook shared on Twitter this evening. Just Water is a water company that sells ethically sourced spring water in paper-based bottles with sugarcane caps, all of which is more environmentally friendly than a standard plastic bottle. In addition to plain spring water, Just Water also offers infused flavors like lemon, tangerine, and apple cinnamon. Everyone deserves access to quality water. Thanks for the leading the charge, @officialjaden, and for sharing your passion for the environment with us today at Apple Park. Your enthusiasm is contagious! 🌎 pic.twitter.com/2juv8zxMWT— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) April 19, 2019 The Smiths were at Apple Park ahead of Earth Day, which takes place on Monday, April 22. Apple today also released its annual environmental report and launched its Material Recovery Lab in Austin, Texas. In celebration of Earth Day, Apple plans to host environment-themed Today at Apple sessions at its Apple retail stores. The company will also feature original stories and app collections in the App Store and will host an Earth Day Apple Watch challenge.

Tim Cook Profiled in New Biography as 'The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level'

Several years ago, Leander Kahney released a well-received biography of Jony Ive, outlining how the publicity-shy "genius behind Apple's greatest products" came to play such a prominent role at Apple. Kahney painstakingly researched Ive's background, interviewing numerous friends and acquaintances from various stages of his life to put together a portrait of Apple's design guru. Kahney has now returned with another biography of an Apple executive, and this time he has his sights focused on CEO Tim Cook. Like Ive, Cook is an intensely private person, but Kahney spoke with a number of friends and family members, as well as former coworkers and even a few current Apple executives to learn more about the leader who has had the gargantuan task of following Steve Jobs. While Apple has had some considerable successes under Cook, some have been critical of the direction the company has taken under his leadership, whether it be product missteps, a perceived lack of innovation, or changes in the company's focus. Kahney finds little to dislike about Cook's tenure, however, as is made immediately clear by his book's title: Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level. Kahney centers his book around six values he argues "provide the foundation" for Cook's leadership at Apple: accessibility, education, environment, inclusion and diversity, privacy and security, and supplier responsibility. After a quick look at Cook's 2011 elevation to the CEO position and the death of Steve Jobs, the book delves into Cook's history, starting with his upbringing in Alabama and his

Tim Cook Travels to China, Meets With Vice Premier and Developers

Apple CEO Tim Cook is in China this week ahead of the annual China Development Forum that promotes economic growth in the country. Cook was photographed at an Apple Store in Beijing's central Wangfujing shopping district on Thursday, where he attended a music-related Today at Apple session. On Friday, Cook met with developers and visited the Palace Museum, which has an ARKit-based app that offers tourists an immersive experience. Later on Friday, Cook met with politician Sun Chunlan, a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China. The state-run news agency Xinhua claims that Sun made positive remarks about Apple and the company's role in Sino-U.S. relations. Cook, who has shared pictures of his trip on Weibo, is reportedly set to attend the annual China Development Forum in Beijing on Saturday. Cook co-chaired the event in 2018, calling for stronger data privacy regulations in the wake of the major Facebook and Cambridge Analytica data scandal. Cook will then likely take a direct flight back to California in time for Apple's media event on Monday at Steve Jobs Theater, where the company is widely expected to introduce two new services for streaming video and

Tim Cook Changes Twitter Name to 'Tim Apple' After President Trump's Name Flub

In a meeting of the Workforce Policy Advisory Board yesterday, U.S. President Donald Trump mistakenly referred to Apple CEO Tim Cook as "Tim Apple" in a flub that quickly spread around the internet. Cook today joined in on the fun and changed his name on Twitter from Tim Cook to "Tim ," referencing Trump's mistake. During yesterday's meeting, Cook was sitting right next to Trump when Trump referred to him as Tim Apple and he managed to keep a straight face at the time."We're going to be opening up the labor forces because we have to. We have so many companies coming in. People like Tim - you're expanding all over and doing things that I really wanted you to do from the beginning. You used to say, 'Tim, you gotta start doing it here,' and you have really put a big investment in our country. We appreciate it very much, Tim Apple."Trump's mistake went viral on Twitter, spurring endless jokes and comments, especially because it's not the first time he's done it. Last year, he introduced Lockheed Martin CEO Marillyn Hewson as "Marillyn Lockheed." Trump just called Apple CEO Tim Cook “Tim Apple” pic.twitter.com/gTHHtjWvc9— Sean O'Kane (@sokane1) March 6, 2019 Cook was at the meeting because he's a member of the Workforce Policy Advisory Board. The board was put together to make recommendations on policies to "to develop and implement a strategy to revamp the American workforce to better meet the challenges of the 21st century." Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located

Hollywood Producers Say 'Intrusive' Apple Executives and 'Lack of Clarity' Impeding Original Content Efforts

Apple CEO Tim Cook and other executives are getting deeply involved with the behind-the-scenes production of the company's original television shows, which are set to debut later this year. Apple has been "difficult" to deal with on the project, according to unnamed agents and producers working with Apple on its foray into streaming TV (via The New York Post). Cook and other executives have been described as "intrusive," with the biggest complaint involving numerous notes that Apple has been sending streaming partners as they watch each show and contribute their opinion. Other sources stated there has been a "lack of transparency" and "lack of clarity" on what Apple wants throughout the process. One agent noted that Apple has been "very involved," explaining that writers and directors typically prefer to work without heavy oversight from higher-ups in corporate. This involvement has included a repeated note sent by Cook telling producers and showrunners, "don't be so mean!" It's unclear which shows this note has been sent to, and how many. “Tim Cook is giving notes and getting involved,” said a producer who has worked with Apple. One of the CEO’s most repeated notes is “don’t be so mean!,” the source said. Cook has visited the sets of multiple shows, including the Vancouver set of See, a futuristic science fiction show, and the Los Angeles set of the morning show drama starring Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon. In terms of the launch, Apple's nitpicking over content and technology has caused numerous delays, and content partners are said to

Tim Cook to Investors: Apple is Working on Future Products That Will 'Blow You Away'

Apple held its annual investor's meeting at its Apple Park campus in Cupertino, California, this morning, where Apple CEO Tim Cook shared some details on Apple's future product plans. As outlined by Bloomberg, Cook said that Apple is "rolling the dice" on some future products that will "blow you away." Cook went on to say that Apple's eventual goal is to be able reduce the price of the 2018 Retina MacBook Air, which currently starts at $1,200. In reference to the Apple Watch and the AirPods, Cook said there's a "long, great roadmap" of "fantastic" products on the horizon. While Cook did not go into more detail, rumors have suggested that AirPods coming in the near future will be available in new colors (black) and will have new functionality including "Hey Siri" support and the ability to be wirelessly charged. More ambitious products are also rumored to be in the works, including a pair of augmented reality smart glasses and perhaps even a full self-driving vehicle. On the topic of services, Cook said Apple is well on its way towards meeting the goal it set in 2016, which was to double its $25 billion revenue by 2020. Later this month, Apple is expected to unveil two new products in the services category, including a new streaming TV service outfitted with original television shows and a new Apple News service with access to subscription news sites and magazines for a monthly fee. Cook touched on other topics at the meeting as well, including Apple's political ideology. Shareholders soundly rejected a proposal that had suggested the

Tim Cook on Health Records Privacy: 'People Will Look at This and Feel That They Can Trust Apple'

In an NPR piece on the privacy of storing health records on the iPhone, Apple CEO Tim Cook this week said that Apple is a company that people can trust with sensitive information. As evidence, Cook said that Apple has always avoided selling user data, something that Cook and other executives have repeated time and time again.In an interview with NPR, Cook says acquiring user data to sell ads is something his company has avoided. "People will look at this and feel that they can trust Apple," he says. "That's a key part of anyone that you're working with on your health."Apple executives have always pointed out that its customers are not its product, something that distinguishes Apple from other tech companies like Google and Facebook that rely heavily on user data for marketing and monetization purposes. According to Cook, Apple's privacy commitment is serious and not something that the company says just to earn customer trust."It's not the way we look it in terms of advantages," he says. "The reality is that I know for me, I want to do business with people that have my health data, people that I deeply trust."Cook's statement is part of a wider look at the Health Records feature added to the iPhone last year, which is designed to allow iPhone users to see actual medical records from hospitals, clinics, and doctors right in the Health app. Apple has partnered with many different institutions for the Health Records feature, bringing easy access to health data to millions of people. Sam Cavaliere, a tech worker who uses Health Records and was featured in the NPR

Customer Emails to Tim Cook Said to Have Helped Shape Apple Watch Development

During his time as Apple CEO, Steve Jobs was well known for personally responding to some of the customer emails he received, which has even led to some of his best replies being collected in a book. Customers who email current Apple CEO Tim Cook also occasionally receive responses, and a CNBC report over the weekend reveals how these emails are processed and often shared with other executives within Apple. According to people familiar with how the process works, Cook has an assistant whose job it is to read the mail, forward some to him for personal attention, and share others to a group distribution list of executives on the relevant teams. They forward the letters to their reports, and so on down the chain. Many of these "Dear Tim" letters are ultimately passed around by rank-and-file employees, according to one current and two former employees.In an example of how customer emails can influence product decisions, the report highlights how some of these messages played a particularly influential role in the development of the Apple Watch. After the Apple Watch launched in 2015, the company promoted a variety of features on it, including communications, entertainment, and health and fitness tracking. But then the missives started pouring in from users, describing how the device alerted them to potentially serious medical conditions and even saved lives. After this, Apple began shifting the emphasis of the watch more toward health features.One former Apple employee reportedly described the emails as a "surprise," given that the Apple

Apple CEO Tim Cook to Deliver 2019 Commencement Speech at Stanford

Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to deliver Stanford's 2019 commencement speech on Sunday, June 16, the university announced today. Stanford chose Cook because he has been a "prominent voice on ethics in technologies and businesses," with insights into the challenges facing corporations and society today. According to Stanford, the issues that Cook has raised "dovetail" with the Stanford "Our Vision" planning process which advocates for research on the social and ethical impact of advances in science and tech and makes sure students have the tools to "address societal and ethical impacts of science and technology.""Tim Cook has spoken forcefully of the challenges and responsibilities confronting corporations and our society today," said Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne. "In tackling these, he has led with vision and values - qualities that reflect the culture of our Stanford community, and that are top-of-mind for our students and our country. Tim was a natural choice to challenge and encourage our graduates as they leave our campus and find their own paths in the world."Cook said that he was honored to be invited to deliver the commencement address at Stanford."It's an honor to have been invited by Stanford's students and faculty, and I look forward to deepening the remarkable relationship that Stanford and Apple have built together over many years," Cook said. "We share so much more than geography. The passion, interests and creativity our institutions have in common have helped to revolutionize technology and reshape the world, and I can't wait to

Tim Cook Named to President Trump's American Workforce Policy Advisory Board

The U.S. Department of Commerce today announced the 25 members of the Trump administration's new American Workforce Policy Advisory Board, including Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty. The advisory board's recommendations will help guide the National Council for the American Worker's efforts to establish a strategy to ensure that American students and workers have access to "affordable, relevant, and innovative education and job training that will equip them to compete and win in the global economy." The board, co-chaired by U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump, is expected to help address a "skills crisis" due to the rapidly increasing use of technology, automation, and artificial intelligence that is shaping many industries across the United States. The full list of members:Jay Box, President, Kentucky Community and Technical College System Walter Bumphus, President & CEO, American Association of Community Colleges Jim Clark, President & CEO, Boys & Girls Clubs of America Tim Cook, CEO, Apple Tom Donohue, CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Juanita Duggan, President & CEO, National Federation for Independent Business Elizabeth Goettl, President & CEO, Cristo Rey Network Marillyn Hewson, Chairman, President, & CEO, Lockheed Martin Eric Holcomb, Governor, Indiana Barbara Humpton, CEO, Siemens USA Al Kelly, CEO, Visa Vi Lyles, Mayor, Charlotte, North Carolina Bill McDermott, CEO, SAP America Sean McGarvey, President, North America’s Building and Trades Unions Doug McMillon, President & CEO, Walmart Cra