Apple Park

Apple Park is Apple's second campus in Cupertino, California. It is often referred to as the "spaceship" campus due to its unique ring-shaped design. Encompassing 2.8 million square feet and spanning 176 acres, construction on the campus started in 2013 and work was largely completed by the end of 2017.

The entire front of the main building features iconic curved glass windows, letting employees look out at the rest of the campus, which will be covered in greenery and an orchard. Along with the primary building that will house 13,000 employees, there's an underground auditorium for hosting events, a fitness center, a cafe, and a visitor's center complete with an Apple Store for customers to visit. Underground parking is available, and there are also two research and development facilities located nearby.

Apple Park was designed by late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs in partnership with Norman Foster.

'Apple Park' Articles

New Apple Park Drone Videos Spot Workers Cleaning Window Shades, Increased Landscaping, and More

Drone videographers Duncan Sinfield and Matthew Roberts each uploaded new videos to their YouTube channels over the past day, covering the latest views of Apple Park from the sky. The videos come a few hours ahead of Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference, which is happening about 8 miles to the east of Apple Park at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose. Image via Matthew Roberts/Maverick Imagery In Cupertino, the company's ringed campus "continues to evolve," according to Sinfield. For June 2018, this means that around 9,000 trees have now been permanently planted around the campus, employees are continuing to relocate onto the site "every week," and cleaning crews are working twenty-four hours a day to maintain the central spaceship building and the structures surrounding it, "including washing the window shades at least once per week." At around the two minute mark in his video, Sinfield spots a few Apple Park workers doing just that. Roberts also catches a few workers cleaning the window shades in the central courtyard of the spaceship building, pointing out that he has seen "notable changes" in the "amount of detail paid to keeping the spaceship clean" and in the expansion of greenery around the campus. Otherwise, Roberts catches nice glimpses into Apple Park's main atrium, the employees' outdoor activity area with basketball courts, and the stairs that lead down into the underground portion of the Steve Jobs Theater. Drone video updates from videographers like Sinfield and Roberts have become slightly less frequent as Apple Park finally ends

Drone Videographer Duncan Sinfield: 'Only a Matter of Time' Until Apple Park Shuts Down Drone Flights

Duncan Sinfield says that piloting his drones over Apple Park has become increasingly difficult in the past few weeks, and that he believes it's "only a matter of time until the campus becomes shut-off to drones completely." Sinfield's comment on Apple Park security comes in the text description of a new video that he uploaded today, where he talks about the response that he's been getting to drone piloting over the campus. The drone videographer says that security "generally responds" to his precise takeoff location "in 10 minutes or less." He speculates that Apple has set up a geofence of some kind and that the company could be tracking all drone flights near the campus in an effort to lower the amount of eyes on Apple Park. He further guesses that Apple might be using technology from a company like Dedrone, which describes itself as "the airspace security platform that detects, classifies, and mitigates all drone threats.​" This is an extended length video, it's only a matter of time until the campus becomes shut-off to drones completely... with a geo-fence, or something similar. Security at Apple Park generally responds in two white Prius's to my precise take-off locations in 10 minutes or less. While this is speculation, my instincts tell me that Apple is tracking all drones in the vicinity of the campus with sophisticated radio frequency technology from companies such as DeDrone (a San Francisco-based aerospace security company). As always, I respect all requests by Apple Security to land my drone and leave the area when asked to do so. They are always

New Footage Captures Drone Crash Over Apple Park

It's been well over two years since monthly drone updates have been shared online covering the construction progress of Apple's second campus in California, called Apple Park. Over the weekend, drone videographer Matthew Roberts posted his latest video on YouTube, but instead of covering the newest updates to the campus, the video captured a drone that malfunctioned and crashed over Apple Park. Roberts said the crashed drone's operator got in touch with him, asking for help in locating the downed drone on Apple's new campus and sharing the footage from the crash with Roberts. The drone that crashed is said to be one of DJI's devices, so the owner was able to review a cached version of the video on the DJI app on their phone/tablet following the incident. "There were no signs of premature failure," the owner said, and it's still unclear why the drone malfunctioned. Roberts eventually discovered the drone crashed among the solar panels on the roof of the main Apple Park building. The drone's owner has contacted Apple and notified them of the incident, and Roberts said that "it remains to be seen" if Apple will return the drone back to its owner. In the video, it appears that the drone has remained mostly intact following the crash. In the latest monthly update of Apple Park shared by Roberts earlier in February, the new campus was described as seeing increased activity from employees now that more have moved in, with bicycles appearing throughout parking lots and on walkways. The maintenance facility has also been completed, but Apple is still working on

Apple's Transition to New Headquarters Should Accelerate as More Occupancy Permits Granted

While some construction remains underway at Apple Park on both the inside and outside, an increasing number of Apple employees will likely transition to the company's new headquarters over the next few months. VentureBeat reports that Apple received temporary occupancy permits for five of the 12 sections of the main circular building on the campus in late December. The report adds that Apple is on track to receive temporary occupancy permits for all of the other sections between late January and March at the latest. The permits should accelerate the move-in process for some 12,000 employees that will eventually work out of Apple Park, with many coming from the company's nearby Infinite Loop campus, both of which are located in Cupertino, California. Apple employees have generally remained quiet about the move, in line with the company's secretive culture, but a few mentions have surfaced on social media platforms like Twitter and Snapchat since early January. One employee tweeted that Wednesday was his last day at Apple's previous Infinite Loop headquarters. Last day at the Loop. It’s always felt surreal to be in these buildings where so much has happened. Next week starts at the new campus, Apple Park, where new history will be made.— Brian (@littlebluebro) January 25, 2018 Apple had already received temporary occupancy permits last year for certain sections of Apple Park that contain the restaurant and atrium. Permits were also granted for the Apple Park Visitor Center and Steve Jobs Theater, where Apple unveiled the iPhone X and will host its annual

First Apple Park Drone Video of 2018 Captures Footage of Courtyard and More

Drone videographer Duncan Sinfield has shared the first new Apple Park drone footage of 2018 on YouTube today. The three minute video includes shots of Apple Park's large central courtyard, employee fitness center and basketball courts, the Steve Jobs Theater, and more. The first part of Sinfield's new video focuses on the landscaping within Apple Park's courtyard, which is still being finished up in the new year. Greenery now covers most of the space and surrounds the main water feature, which is complete. Landscaping has been a major part of the last few Apple Park drone videos -- most recently in one shared by Matthew Roberts last month -- with most of the large equipment moved off of the campus since the majority of construction is now complete. In the new video, you can also briefly see the Steve Jobs Theater and Apple Park Visitor Center. The main atrium is captured, as well as the outside dining terrace where employees can sit and eat lunch. One of the areas where construction remains ongoing is the piece of land between the Steve Jobs Theater and the main spaceship building, where some vehicles and equipment remain inside of a red fence. Although small pieces of construction and landscaping remain, employees have already moved into Apple Park and the Visitor Center opened to the public last November. Next month will mark one year since Apple officially named the campus "Apple Park," at the time explaining that it would take more than six months to move its planned 12,000 employees to the

New Apple Park Drone Video Captures Latest Construction Progress as 2018 Completion Date Nears

Drone videographer Matthew Roberts is continuing to capture footage of Apple's new headquarters, Apple Park, as construction on the campus grows nearer to completion. The latest video showcases a few finished amenities, like the dining terrace outside of the spaceship's atrium where employees can eat lunch. Within the spaceship building, landscaping is said to be "nearly complete" and rows of trees can be seen surrounding the courtyard's finished central pond. The new video also captures a glimpse at the Visitor's Center, which was completed for the press to visit in September during the iPhone X event, and opened to the public this past November. Some progress has been made on the entrance and exit road leading to the campus, with a security checkpoint added to the Wolfe Road entrance to Apple Park, placed in front of the underground tunnel. Despite all of the finished buildings, areas of the campus are still riddled with construction equipment and dirt mounds, proving that Apple Park's long construction period isn't quite over yet. One of the main unfinished locations appears to be a large, empty area in front of the fitness center where landscaping needs to be completed. When construction on Apple Park began in 2013, a completion date of Summer 2017 was set. Although employees began moving into the campus earlier in spring, it now appears that construction will finally be finished sometime in the early part of

Apple Design Chief Jony Ive Discusses iPhone X and Apple Park in New Interview

Apple design chief Jony Ive recently sat down for an interview with Smithsonian Magazine, where he once again discussed his work on Apple's newest campus, Apple Park, and the latest flagship iPhone, the iPhone X. As he mentioned in a prior interview, Ive is excited about the design space at Apple Park because it will allow the entire design team to work together. Industrial designers, font experts, motion graphics experts, and computer interface designers will be able to come together to interact in new ways and share ideas. The design space will also feature several milling machines to create prototypes, which Ive believes are an integral part of the design process."I think you only really understand a material--its properties and attributes and, importantly, the opportunity the material allows--if you actually work it yourself," Ive says. "And the most remarkable point in the whole process is when you make the first model. We might like it, we might not, but the first model you make, everything changes."On the subject of the iPhone X, Ive says its all-glass design and edge-to-edge display is something Apple "aspired to for years." In comparison, Ive critiqued older iPhone designs. "It now seems to me a rather disconnected component housed in an enclosure," he said of the iPhone 7 Plus. The rest of the interview, which also includes anecdotes on Ive's childhood and the Apple Watch, can be read over on the Smithsonian website. Along with his interview in Smithsonian Magazine, Ive today spoke about the future of design at the Hirshorn Museum in Washington, DC.

Nearly Completed Apple Park Campus Shown Off in New Drone Video

Work on Apple Park is nearing completion, and the latest drone video shared today by drone pilot Matthew Roberts shows off recent progress and finishing touches that are being put in place on buildings and outdoor areas. Today's video features the now-completed Apple Park Visitor's Center, located across the street from the main ring-shaped building. The Visitor's Center, which boasts a huge carbon fiber roof and is made from the same materials that were used for the main building, opened last Friday. The Visitor's Center features an indoor area with a replica of Apple Park that comes to life using an augmented reality app, a rooftop viewing deck that gives some obscured views of the main campus, a cafe that serves coffee, tea, and snacks, and an Apple Store that sells standard Apple products and some exclusive Apple Park gear like t-shirts, hats, tote bags, and postcards. Progress has been made on the landscaping, with lush grass now planted outside of the cafeteria's enormous glass double doors, and the pond at the center of the campus has been filled with water. Outdoor food stations are nearing completion, and the solar panels on the roof of the ring-shaped building have all been installed. Apple Park will run entirely on renewable energy provided by the solar panels on the roof. While much of the campus is complete, there's still some work to be done. Landscaping is still ongoing in the area near the employee fitness center, for example. Even though landscaping work is not finished, employees are already moving into Apple Park. At this pace, it appears

Apple Park Visitor's Center Now Open to the Public

The Visitor's Center at Apple's new Apple Park campus opened up to the public this morning, allowing Apple fans to visit the Cupertino location to check out the campus and purchase souvenirs and snacks. It features a cantilevered carbon fiber roof that was designed to look like it floats, along with staircases, stone walls, and terrazzo floors that match the aesthetic of the rest of the campus. Inside, there's a large 3D model of Apple Park that provides guests with information about the campus through an augmented reality experience provided through dedicated iPads. A store area offers a range of Apple products and accessories, including Apple Park-exclusive T-shirts, hats, postcards, baby onesies, playing cards, and tote bags. A cafe built into the Visitor's Center offers coffee, tea, and snacks. On the roof, there's a roof terrace that offers views of the main building and the landscaping, which includes more than 9,000 trees. While visitors can view the rest of Apple Park from the Visitor's Center, the other areas of the campus are off limits. The Apple Park Visitor's Center is open from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Monday through Friday. On Saturdays, it opens at 10:00 a.m. and closes at 6:00 p.m., and on Sundays, it opens at 11:00 a.m. and closes at 6:00

Apple Park Visitor Center Set to Open to the Public on November 17

The Visitor Center at Apple's new Apple Park campus will open to the public on Friday, November 17, according to an internal email that Apple sent out to employees today. The date is also listed on a sign at Apple Park that was shared today on Twitter, but the sign does not offer up a specific time for the event. According to our source, the Apple Park Visitor Center features a gift shop with Apple-branded items available for purchase, much like the store at One Infinite Loop, but it does not have a full Apple Store and will not stock devices like the iPhone X. Prior to the November 17 grand opening, Apple is inviting Cupertino residents who live near the Apple Park campus to preview the Visitor Center on Thursday, November 16. Residents can visit Apple Park from 3:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., with a photo ID confirming a nearby address required for entry. Just got an invite to visit Apple’s new visitor center. Cool tin foil shiny “Hello” harking back to the Mac’s introduction Tip @Techmeme pic.twitter.com/EogVpN9wes— Abbi Vakil (@AbbiV) November 8, 2017 The Apple Park Visitor Center features a rooftop observation deck that overlooks the main ring-shaped building on the campus, along with a cafe, an outdoor seating area, and indoor wooden

Apple Park 'Nearly Complete' as Construction Begins on Basketball Courts and Other Employee Amenities

Apple Park is officially nearing completion as 2017 winds down, according to a new drone video that has captured footage of the company's campus. Shared by Matthew Roberts, the video comes nearly one month after an update in late September showed off Apple Park at sunset, and almost one year after "major landscaping changes" appeared around the campus. Now, according to Roberts, Apple Park is "nearly complete," with fewer pieces of construction equipment dotting the site. Landscaping remains a focus for the remaining work, and paths are being paved throughout the campus to connect buildings and areas of Apple Park for its employees. In terms of complete buildings, the new video showcases the finalized Visitor's Center, which members of the media got to visit during the iPhone X event in September. Roberts' drone video also shared progress made on the sporting areas at Apple Park that the company has built for workers to unwind, including an outdoor spot for basketball and tennis courts currently in the middle of construction. Elsewhere on the campus, there's also a 100,000 square foot fitness center for employees to work out in. Although Apple Park isn't yet officially finished with construction, some workers have already moved in to offices on the campus, and Apple hosted its iPhone X event at the Steve Jobs Theater last month. Once it is finally completed and all employees are moved in, Apple Park will house 12,000 workers across its 2.8 million square foot

New Drone Video Captures Footage of Apple Park and Steve Jobs Theater at Sunset

Although employees moved into Apple Park earlier in the spring, it has been reported that it will take until the end of the year for construction to be completed. Since that date is now fast approaching, a new drone video by Matthew Roberts has shared some aerial footage of the progress Apple has made since the last update earlier in September. The video provides a few clear shots inside of the main spaceship building at Apple Park during sunset, where the tree-lined atrium welcomes employees, as well as some views inside the Steve Jobs Theater. Apple introduced the iPhone X there on September 12, inviting employees and members of the media to watch the event inside the underground auditorium and then get hands-on with the new smartphone as the event ended. The new drone video even includes a quick glimpse directly down through the roof of Apple Park's main building, thanks to a series of glass panels sitting between the solar panels that line the top of the structure. It's unclear exactly when Apple expects to finally be done with construction on the campus. In today's video there are still multiple construction crews and pieces of equipment sitting outside of the central building. Roberts' video also includes a few shots of the Visitor's Center and the underground tunnel that funnels traffic through the campus. Once everything is completed Apple Park will house around 12,000 employees, and include 9,000 trees, a large pond, walking trails, benches, and a fitness center for

Apple Park Visitor's Center Shown Off in New Images

Ahead of Tuesday's iPhone-centric event that will see members of the media invited to Apple's new Apple Park campus for the first time, close-up images of a nearly completed visitor's center have surfaced. The images were snapped by a resident who lives in Cupertino and shared with TheApplePost. According to the photographer, construction crews were working on the building late at night, perhaps suggesting Apple is aiming to have it completed soon. The visitor's center, made from glass, appears to include the same wooden tables that are found in Apple Stores, plus an accessory wall at the back, which makes sense as it will serve as both an Apple Store and an area for visitor's to stop by when coming to the Apple Park campus. A rooftop observation deck is built into the visitor's center, allowing people to get a view of the main building, and it has a cafe and an outdoor seating area, according to building plans. A rendering of the Apple Park visitor's center It's not clear when Apple plans to officially open the visitor's center on the campus, but given that it looks nearly complete, it could perhaps open on Tuesday alongside the Steve Jobs Theater where Apple's iPhone event will be

Steve Jobs Theater Includes Custom-Made Rotating Elevators and Retractable Wall Hiding Demo Area

We're six days away from Apple's iPhone 8 reveal event, set to be the first major product unveiling taking place at Apple Park, in the new Steve Jobs Theater auditorium. To get fans ready, Bloomberg today posted a detailed look into the internals of the Steve Jobs Theater, highlighting a few well-known facts while also sharing new tidbits of information about the building that's dedicated in memory of the late Apple CEO Steve Jobs. The theater is built on a piece of high ground, allowing its occupants to catch a wide view of Apple Park from inside its glass walls, as well as hiding the building's four underground stories. The media will enter through the glass-encased lobby, and will be able to descend down two curved staircases into the main auditorium. However, two custom-made rotating elevators will also shuttle occupants into the lower sections and back up again after the event. It also boasts two custom-made rotating elevators, which turn as they ascend and descend so that passengers enter and exit by the same door even as they go in and out from different directions. So far, so Apple—the more elegant single door, with its complex engineering, preferred to the more obvious double-door solution. Down in the auditorium, the 1,000-occupant capacity theater holds as many leather seats, and earlier reports estimated each to cost around $14,000. In these seats, onlookers will get to watch the unveiling of the iPhone 8, iPhone 7s, iPhone 7s Plus, Apple Watch Series 3, and more next Tuesday, September 12, and afterwards more architectural "surprises" will be presented

New Apple Park Drone Video Shows Off Steve Jobs Theater Ahead of Next Week's Event

Construction on Apple Park is nearing completion and Apple is putting the finishing touches on the Steve Jobs Theater where next week's iPhone-centric event will be held, according to a new video shared this evening by drone pilot Duncan Sinfield. Sinfield's video offers up a close look at the now-finished theater and it depicts landscaping progress at the campus, both inside and outside of the ring-shaped main building. The theater is a 20-foot tall glass cylinder that overlooks the main campus building and is surrounded by greenery. It boasts the world's largest freestanding carbon fiber roof and spans 120,000 square feet with an underground auditorium area that seats 1,000 people. Apple named the theater in honor of late Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs, who envisioned the design for Apple Park before his death in 2011. Apple's iPhone keynote, which takes place on Tuesday, September 12, will be the inaugural event at the Steve Jobs Theater. Apple announced Apple Park as the location for the event when it sent out media invites last Thursday.

New Drone Video Shows Continued Landscaping and Construction at Apple Park

Apple is putting the finishing touches on its Apple Park campus in Cupertino, California, and a new video shared today by drone pilot Duncan Sinfield shows the company's recent progress on landscaping and other final construction projects. Greenery is being added to the interior and exterior of the ring-shaped main building at a rapid pace, filling in an area that was once just mounds of dirt. Apple is using native plants and trees, and is said to be planting thousands of trees in Apple Park, including many fruit trees. Much of the interior of the building is outfitted with furniture, and work is largely completed on the solar panels on the roof and the window shades that will protect the building from bright sunlight to moderate the inside temperature. The Steve Jobs Theater, where Apple will host events, appears to be nearly complete, but there's still construction equipment in the area, so it's not quite clear if it will be ready in time for Apple's September iPhone event. Along with the main drone video showing off Apple's progress, Sinfield has also published a 360-degree video. The video doesn't work in Apple's Safari browser, but if you use Chrome you can rotate the video to get a full view of the campus. On an iPhone, the YouTube app can be used with tilt gestures for a more complete picture of Apple Park. Apple employees started moving in to Apple Park earlier this year, but it will take until the end of the year for the campus to be complete and for all of the employees to transition to the location. Apple Park will be the home of

Latest Apple Park Drone Video Shows More Trees and Paved Walkway to Steve Jobs Theater

Matthew Roberts has shared his latest drone tour of Apple Park, providing a closer look at Apple's new headquarters as construction wraps up. There aren't many notable changes since the July video, but August's edition reveals further landscaping efforts, including more trees — there will be over 9,000 in total — planted within the inner circle of the main building. Apple has also begun paving certain areas of Apple Park, including the walkway to Steve Jobs Theater. Many areas of the campus remain covered in dirt, however, so it's clear there is still a lot of landscaping work to be completed. Some of Apple's employees have already moved into the new headquarters, while others like design chief Jony Ive and his team will follow suit later this year. The new campus will eventually house around 12,000 employees. Apple will still use its Infinite Loop headquarters as an ancillary campus, along with a handful of other offices in the Cupertino and Sunnyvale

Some Apple Park Employees Said to Be Dissatisfied With Open Office Design

During a new episode of The Talk Show on Daring Fireball, John Gruber touched on the topic of the open floor plans that Apple has implemented within its new campus, Apple Park. Unlike office spaces at One Infinite Loop and other Apple-owned buildings -- which give most employees their own office -- Apple Park sports a large open floor plan with long tables for programmers, engineers, and other employees to work at. Apple Park's open office spaces have been highlighted in numerous profiles on the campus, most recently by The Wall Street Journal in July, and now Gruber has reported that he's received emails from numerous Apple employees who are particularly dissatisfied with the design (via Silicon Valley Business Journal). Standing desks within one of Apple Park's open offices Judging from the private feedback I've gotten from some Apple employees, I'm 100% certain there's going to be some degree of attrition based on the open floor plans. Where good employees are going to choose to leave because they don't want to work there. One source is said to have been with the company for 18 years. They emailed Gruber, telling him that they're working on something that is "going to blow people's minds when we ship," but before that happens their team is transitioning to Apple Park. Gruber noted that the email was very level-headed and had a "perfect Apple sensibility," but the source nevertheless said that if they don't like the Apple Park workspaces, they're likely to leave the company after the product ships. Gruber said he got a "couple of similar emails," with employees

Jony Ive Talks Apple Park, Scoffs at Claim of New Campus Contributing to Local Tree Shortage

WSJ. Magazine has shared a lengthy interview with Apple design chief Jony Ive about Apple Park, the company's new headquarters in Cupertino, California, revealing a few new anecdotes about the all-new campus and the exhaustive architectural process that has gone into constructing it. Ive, for instance, reportedly scoffed at a recent article claiming Apple Park has contributed to a tree shortage in the San Francisco Bay Area.Ive takes offense at the idea that he hasn’t already thought of every detail during the years of planning Apple Park. He scoffs at an article claiming that Apple contributed to a tree shortage in the Bay Area by buying up so many plants for the campus, “as if we’d got to the end of our project and we thought, Oh, we’d better plant some trees.” Apple began working with an arborist years ago to source trees, including varieties that once made up the bountiful orchards of Silicon Valley; more than 9,000, many of them drought-resistant, will have been planted by the time the campus is finished.The report also mentions that Ive's design team will be among the last to move into the new headquarters this fall. Employees began moving over from Apple's existing Infinite Loop campus in April, and when the transition is completed, the spaceship-like campus will reportedly house some 12,000 workers. Apple Park's fourth floor is where the company's executives will be situated, including Ive's design studio, along with the Apple Watch team and part of the group working on Siri, according to the report. Apple's Mac and iPad divisions will be interspersed with

Latest Drone Footage Reveals Landscaping Progress in Apple Park's Inner Circle

Drone videographer Duncan Sinfield posted a new video on his YouTube channel today, offering a "late July" bird's eye view of Apple Park, the company's new headquarters in Cupertino, California. Sinfield's video reveals landscaping around the campus has picked up momentum in the last few weeks, with a large grove of trees in the inner circle of Apple Park being the clearest sign of progress. When finished, Apple Park will be surrounded by some 9,000 trees. The landscaping is being overseen by an arborist personally chosen by the late Steve Jobs, who believed trees would be one of the most important parts of the Park and represent a microcosm of the old Silicon Valley, when there were said to be more fruit trees than engineers. Tantau Avenue, which runs along the east side of the campus, has been closed to vehicle traffic for much of July as Apple works rapidly to finish the Visitor's Center ahead of the official opening day. Apple started hiring employees last month for the Visitor Center, which will include an Apple Store and a public cafe. Earlier this month we got a glimpse of Apple Park's Glendenning Barn, a historic landmark that the company carefully dismantled piece by piece and relocated to another part of the site, which was formerly a HP