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App Store Sets New Records With $240M in Sales on New Year's Day, $20B Paid to Developers in 2016

Apple today announced that January 1, 2017 was the iOS App Store's "busiest day ever" with $240 million total in customer purchases made on the storefront on New Year's Day. Looking back at the past year, App Store developers made $20 billion in 2016, which the company said was up 40 percent from 2015.

In the announcement, Apple gave a few statistics on categories like the top grossing apps of the year, which included Monster Strike, Fantasy Westward, Clash Royale, and Pokémon Go. Following a launch in December, Super Mario Run was the number one downloaded app on both Christmas Day and New Year's Day. Throughout December, customers spent $3 billion in total on the App Store, which Apple said was another record-breaking month for the company.

app-store-new-years-record
“2016 was a record-shattering year for the App Store, generating $20 billion for developers, and 2017 is off to a great start with January 1 as the single biggest day ever on the App Store,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing. “We want to thank our entire developer community for the many innovative apps they have created — which together with our products — help to truly enrich people’s lives.”
In total, the App Store now offers 2.2 million apps, having increased by 20 percent from 2015. Independently developed apps, like Prisma, Reigns, Procreate, Lumino City, Sweat With Kayla and djay Pro, were listed as some of the "most successful apps" of 2016.

Globally, Apple said that the App Store helped raise over $17 million in both the fight against AIDS thanks to its annual PRODUCT(RED) campaign, as well as for the World Wildlife Fund thanks to the Apps for Earth program. The Chinese App Store has grown 90 percent in 2016, and in total the top-grossing markets for the App Store are ranked as: the U.S., China, Japan and the U.K.

In terms of apps with subscription fees, Netflix, HBO Now, Line, Tinder and MLB.com At Bat were listed as the most popular. Revenue from subscription fees grew 74 percent in 2016 to $2.7 billion, following major changes Apple made to App Store fees for these specific subscription video apps.

The all-new iMessage App Store also got a mention today, with Apple announcing that 21,000 iMessages apps are now available for users to install. Data gathered by Sensor Tower back in September accounted for just under 2,000 iMessage apps in the App Store, with sticker-related apps remaining the most popular throughout the year.

Tag: App Store


Top Rated Comments

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8 weeks ago
And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why so much of Apple's focus is on iOS devices. They'd be foolish not to focus on the cash cow that generated 240M in revenue in ONE day. That's 10M per hour. Absolutely crazy.
Rating: 19 Votes
8 weeks ago
Can't find any thing negative to comment about in this article. Drats Apple, we here expect to find fault. Please make another statement that we can whine about. Thanks.
Rating: 17 Votes
8 weeks ago
"why do apps always get on the iPhone first?"

Lol
Rating: 11 Votes
8 weeks ago

Exactly right. Tim Cook is doing the right thing by devoting more and more resources to the iOS ecosystem, and phasing out investments in the Mac. I don't expect Mac fans to be happy, but Apple is doing the right thing for the vast majority of its customers.


They could focus on both, it is not like they are a tiny company with limited resources.
Rating: 10 Votes
8 weeks ago
False Logic: iOS makes a lot of money, we have to abandon the Mac. Apple can make both.

1)Apple doesn't create the actual apps, they just get a cut for it being sold in their iTunes store
2)Apple basically makes 1 hardware platform and 1 OS. The iphone, the iPad which is a big iPhone, and iOS which already exists so they just tweak and update it.

While good for them to make so much money out of it, I just don't see how this is enough reason to abandon the Mac and OS X...which I imagine they use to build and design the iphone and iOS.
Rating: 6 Votes
8 weeks ago
Never ceases to amaze me. I've had an iPhone since the beginning and I don't think I've spent more than $10 on the App Store. I'm too lazy to look, but I'd like to know what types of apps are generating the most revenue. I imagine it's games.
Rating: 6 Votes
8 weeks ago
The distribution of these dollars to developers would be way more interesting.
It's the typical 1%, 99% Problem.
Rating: 5 Votes
8 weeks ago

Exactly right. Tim Cook is doing the right thing by devoting more and more resources to the iOS ecosystem, and phasing out investments in the Mac. I don't expect Mac fans to be happy, but Apple is doing the right thing for the vast majority of its customers.

Don't forget the old warning about not putting all your eggs in one basket.
Rating: 5 Votes
8 weeks ago
I used to be an appoholic and had hundreds upon hundreds of apps installed on my iPhone. Maybe even close to a thousand at one point. I had so many on my iPhone 3g within a month of the App Store launching (about 60-80, which was a lot then) that it caused serious problems on the device—so serious that Steve Jobs himself responded to my email and put me in touch with senior engineers at the company to figure out what was going on. I was always buying the latest apps, especially if there was a sale and AppShopper alerted me.

Nowadays I hardly install any apps, and the only one I can remember paying for recently was Mario and maybe some Apple TV games a few months ago. It's just weird having been so involved in trying out new apps since the launch of the App Store that my interest in doing so has completely flatlined. I think a big part of it is the freemium crap we see everywhere. I just don't buy into that. The other part is UI/UX design in apps.

It was really fascinating to me as this new touch input method was catching on how different developers would construct their interfaces and gestures. It was always changing and improving. It even inspired me to seek approval and funding at work to design our own app. I feel like a lot of that magic is gone and things now are fairly regimented. The surprise and delight factor is gone. I also feel like I got screwed over by certain apps I paid for. There are a few examples of this, going back to Loren Britcher's Tweetie which was sold to Twitter and transformed into an awful app. There have also been several email apps that I've tried which always eventually get shut down or sold and then shut down. It's just not worth the hassle for me anymore to try to move away from the stock apps, which have themselves improved quite a bit over the years.

It's great that the App Store seems to be doing well, but I just can't help but feel underwhelmed by it now. I've got a solid foundation of apps and don't need much else.
Rating: 4 Votes
8 weeks ago

The distribution of these dollars to developers would be way more interesting.
It's the typical 1%, 99% Problem.


Read

20 Billion to Developers
Rating: 4 Votes

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