Apple Music Connect


'Apple Music Connect' Articles

Apple Music Connect to Be Removed From Music App Tab Bar in iOS 10

Earlier this week rumors suggested that an Apple Music overhaul is being prepared for a worldwide reveal at WWDC this June, with a launch in the fall within iOS 10. New details shared today by 9to5Mac indicate that one of the streaming music service's least-used features -- the social network-like section called Connect -- will be "demoted" in the overhaul and removed from the app's tab bar completely. Although some users have gone through the process of removing Connect already, allowing them a dedicated Playlist tab in its place, iOS 10 will see Apple moving Connect permanently from the bottom tab and into an integrated section of the "For You" page of Apple Music. Because of this, Connect "is unlikely to see notable new features this year," suggesting this section of Apple Music hasn't lived up to the company's plans laid out at WWDC last year. Overall, the new version of Apple Music is said to focus on black and white backgrounds along with an emphasis on individual album artwork in tracklists. Other basic updates include the introduction of Apple's San Francisco font, a new "Browse" tab, lyrics support, and new 3D Touch shortcut previews. Apple Music's streaming radio network, Beats 1, is believed to remain largely the same as it is currently presented in the app. Read More: Eight Months Later, Apple Music Connect Still 'Fails Miserably' at Social

Eight Months Later, Apple Music Connect Still 'Fails Miserably' at Social

Eight months after posting a detailed summary of the "clunky" behind-the-scenes process musicians have to go through when using Apple Music Connect, Dave Wiskus decided to revisit his stance on the platform to see if Apple had made any notable changes to its grasps at socially connecting artists and fans. Wiskus -- an app developer and lead singer for the band Airplane Mode -- admitted in the blog post that he feels less "connected" to the musical world and thinks the actual social aspects of the experience have failed "miserably." Similar to his post from July, Wiskus expounded on Connect's basic inability to function as a normal social network: it lacks a follow button on artist pages, a metric for how many followers a band has, and individual profile pages for a more engaged community, among other things. One of his most interesting points detailed a blunder with Connect's support, centering around the fact that an artist with a similar name managed to change the profile picture on Airplane Mode's page. After weeks of back-and-forth with Apple Music Connect support, eventually the band discovered that Apple's solution was creating an entirely new profile for Airplane Mode and abandoning the one with the wrong picture. Rather than swap out images, the Connect support folks created a new profile for us with the correct photo (which we still can’t change, by the way). The frustration would end here if not for one little side-effect: we lost all of our posts and all of our followers. Worse yet, those posts and followers are still attached to a now-unmanned

Apple Music Connect's 'Clunky' Posting Process Detailed by Indie Artist

After the launch of Apple Music earlier in the week, many users began searching and following their favorite artists on Apple's new social platform Connect, which aims to showcase new songs, videos, and pictures to fans of artists like Pharrell, Dr. Dre, and more, directly within the app. The process that artists have to take to create content for their fans was unknown, until today, when app developer and indie musician of the band Airplane Mode, Dave Wiskus, posted a detailed summary on his blog of the steps needed to make a post on Apple's new social platform. Wiskus hoped that Apple's promise of Connect at WWDC meant a more level playing field between the musician and app developer worlds within the iTunes marketplace, and that "giving musicians any control at all over their brand identity on the iTunes Music Store," would create a more stress-free and inviting platform for musicians, especially independent ones. So, Wiskus and his band Airplane Mode decided to put Connect through the ringer: debuting a brand new track on the service and seeing if the fans' connection is as front-and-center as Apple intended. The musician's first thoughts of the upload process are summed up in one word: "clunky." Wiskus found he needed the song he wanted to post to be in My Music in the iOS Music app, so for a brand-new, unreleased track, he had to sync it off his computer and then search for it on iOS. GarageBand updates for iOS and Mac released earlier this week also support uploads to Connect, but it is unclear if the format and process of using those apps was even more

Replace the 'Apple Connect' Tab with a 'Playlists' Tab in Apple Music

Earlier today, Apple launched their much anticipated Apple Music streaming service. The iPhone app includes dedicated tabs called "For You", "New", "Radio", "Connect", and "My Music". The first two tabs offer areas for music discovery, while "Radio" provides themed stations as well as Apple's own Beats 1 Radio. Meanwhile, the last tab, "My Music" provides you with access to the rest of your existing music catalog as well as any new songs you might add from Apple Music. The "Connect" tab, however, is a new service from Apple which is described as a place where "musicians give their fans a closer look at their work, their inspirations, and their world." Similar to a social network, it allows users to "follow" their favorite artists and see additional content. If "Connect" doesn't interest you, MacRumors reader Eric points out a handy tip to replace the "Connect" tab with a dedicated "Playlists" tab which he describes as "much more useful". Under Settings -> General -> Restrictions, Apple allows you to disable "Apple Music Connect" which removes the Connect tab and provides the alternate Playlist functionality. Thanks Eric

GarageBand for Mac Gaining New Synths and Features on June 30

Apple has updated its GarageBand for Mac website to confirm that the music creation software will be updated with new features on June 30 alongside the launch of Apple Music, as noted by Macworld editor Kirk McElhearn on his personal blog Kirkville. GarageBand will gain new synth sounds and the software's built-in recording and editing features will be improved. Apple will be adding 100 shape-shifting EDM‑ and Hip Hop‑inspired synth sounds to GarageBand that each feature the Transform Pad Smart Control for morphing and tweaking sounds to your personal liking. The new controls are very similar to the Alchemy software that Apple acquired through its recent purchase of Camel Audio, known for its range of plug-ins, synthesizers, effects and sound libraries. Some of the new synths are demoed on the GarageBand website, including Sweeping Arp, Droplets, Bright Punchy Synth, Pumping Synth Waves and Epic Hook Synth. Apple further outlines that GarageBand's software instrument Smart Controls and Piano Roll Editor will be improved, allowing changes to be captured in real time and fine-tuning of music afterwards. "Capture your changes in real time by adjusting any of your software instruments’ Smart Controls while recording a performance," reads a caption on the GarageBand website. "You can also fine‑tune your music later in the Piano Roll Editor." A footnote lists the new features as available on June 30 in the United States and as "coming soon" in other countries, consistent with the Apple Music website. It is possible that Apple may also add a way for GarageBand