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BlackBerry CEO Says U.S. Government Should Force Apple to Expand iMessage to Other Platforms

BlackBerry CEO John Chen yesterday published a blog post adaptation of a letter in which he presses U.S. government officials to support not only net neutrality but also "application/content neutrality". In Chen's view, all apps and content should be available on all platforms, and he points specifically to Apple's iMessage and Netflix's streaming services as examples of discrimination against BlackBerry.

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Unlike BlackBerry, which allows iPhone users to download and use our BBM service, Apple does not allow BlackBerry or Android users to download Appleā€™s iMessage messaging service. Netflix, which has forcefully advocated for carrier neutrality, has discriminated against BlackBerry customers by refusing to make its streaming movie service available to them.
Chen believes BlackBerry is a leader for content and application neutrality and pushes U.S. government officials to require these same neutral practices from the Canadian company's competitors. "Neutrality must be mandated at the application and content layer if we truly want a free, open and non-discriminatory internet," writes Chen.

Chen's comments have unsurprisingly been met with ridicule by developers who don't wish to be forced to create apps for platforms where they do not expect worthwhile returns, and many observers have suggested BlackBerry should focus its efforts on creating a compelling ecosystem that would attract users and apps organically.

Apple has historically been quiet on broader issues of net neutrality. The Cupertino company was noticeably absent from a list of more than 100 technology companies which signed a letter protesting a proposed change in FCC rules that would allow for Internet fast lanes for certain types of content. Speculation has suggested Apple's absence may be related to its interest in securing priority access with Internet providers for media content delivered by the company.



Top Rated Comments

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21 months ago
Because that's what they did with BBM during their haydays....
Rating: 123 Votes
21 months ago
When blackberry was king of the hill back in the day. BBM was nowhere to be found on other platforms. They only changed there minds when they were at the bottom of the totem pole.
Rating: 105 Votes
21 months ago
Because the government forcing things makes everyone happy!
Rating: 54 Votes
21 months ago
The article was amusing.

It is amazing how things look different from top and then from bottom.
Rating: 40 Votes
21 months ago
Fruit wars! :d
Rating: 28 Votes
21 months ago
I believe that it is what is called competition :eek:
Rating: 23 Votes
21 months ago
Typical from a bottom of the barrel company trying to stay relevant........
Rating: 23 Votes
21 months ago
if gov't were to mandate apps across all platforms then devs would have to build apps for every new gadget platform that comes along, regardless if that added value to to the company and its customers.

how absurd. you cant force value proposition.
Rating: 16 Votes
21 months ago
Hey Chen, why don't you follow Elon Musk and release all of your patents in the sake of net neutrality... hello..?
Rating: 13 Votes
21 months ago
BBM did not exist on other platforms when people actually used it, why should apple have to conform their system just because BB has gone downhill and wants to get some kind of edge?

As for other content, such as Netflix, I don't see why developers and companies should be forced into changing. They obviously want more customers so there must be a specific reasons for not having the app. They shouldn't have to ignore this reason because Blackberry is whining.

All this sounds like to me is BB trying to use legislation in order to get what it wants since, as a company, it's drowning and can't save itself.
Rating: 13 Votes

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