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iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite May Launch Separately Despite Integration Features

While iOS and Mac OS X have traditionally followed different release schedules, Apple's recently announced Continuity features suggested it was possible for Apple's two operating systems to debut at the same time. However, Apple is planning to stagger the releases of both iOS 8 and Mac OS X Yosemite, reports 9to5Mac, citing sources with knowledge of Apple's plans.

continuity
iOS 8 is expected to launch in September alongside the iPhone 6 while OS X Yosemite will not launch until October. Apple used the same release schedule last year, launching iOS 7 alongside the iPhone 5s in September and OS X Mavericks one month later in October.

Continuity allows users to work seamlessly between iPhone, iPad and Mac, with the ability to start emails on one device and easily finish it on another, or using Macs and iPads to answer phone calls and "green bubble" text messages. Because iOS and OS X have never been designed to work better together than with iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite, many saw a dual release as a good opportunity for Apple to cross-promote both its iOS devices and Macs with a stand-out new feature like Continuity.

Apple is planning on using engineering and user interface design members from the iOS team to help complete OS X Yosemite in time for a fall release, with a public beta planned as early asĀ later this month.

Top Rated Comments

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13 weeks ago
Uh, no, this is not okay with me. I want them to be rushed, released simultaneously, and full of bugs that make using both an absolute nightmare. :mad:
Rating: 14 Votes
13 weeks ago
And if this doesn't turn out to be true will Gurman claim it's because of his leak?
Rating: 9 Votes
13 weeks ago

That makes sense, Yosemite has far more bugs than iOS 8 does currently, and Apple also has to fix the numerous bugs for the Swift 1.0 and Xcode 6 releases. September may not be enough time for them.


Thats funny, aside from a new safari bug in beta 4, Yosemite has been nearly rock solid for me on two machines while iOS 8 has been reasonably buggy.

I agree though that it makes sense to stagger the releases of the software. It also helps Apples servers from getting crushed twice as hard when both are released.
Rating: 5 Votes
13 weeks ago

I too am worried about how buggy Yosemite could be, since it's based on Mavericks. They should just fork it straight from Mountain Lion instead to save themselves the trouble of debugging.


If Apple were to do this I'd personally pay them a visit at Apple HQ and slap every engineer across the face. Mavericks has some of the BEST additions to the Mac OS since its inception. Compressed Memory, GL4, Time Coalescing, AppNap, etc...
Rating: 3 Votes
13 weeks ago
We knew that :-)

Apple kerned the** HARD WAY** after the MobileMe Disaster...... too many products out of the gate at once invites disaster and MM was a disaster at launch!
Rating: 2 Votes
13 weeks ago

Thats funny, aside from a new safari bug in beta 4, Yosemite has been nearly rock solid for me on two machines while iOS 8 has been reasonably buggy.


Agreed. I had to go back to iOS 7.1.2 because even basic things like the Messages app weren't functioning for me in iOS 8; the only issue I've had in Yosemite is Safari crashing but DP4 seems to have fixed that for me. All in all, Yosemite is running flawlessly for me.

But everyone has different usage patterns, so our experiences may differ from that of others.
Rating: 1 Votes
13 weeks ago
Boy, how cool would that be, though? Assuming no errors (ha), getting an OS update and an iOS update in the same day and having a whole new way to interact with your devices all together. It'd be like Christmas!
Rating: 1 Votes
13 weeks ago

No, it doesn't need that stuff as long as it's running Mountain Lion or earlier. I've got 6GB of RAM and an HDD, and Mountain Lion runs fine. Mavericks, advertised as faster, runs way slower, plus it has new bugs. It has everything to do with the software.


Of course Mountain Lion runs better, you have aged hardware. You can, however, overcome this with hardware upgrades that you should have done a long time ago considering you bought the most upgradeable Mac available.
Given a system maxed out on RAM and a SSD, Mavericks will run just as fast as Mountain Lion.
Rating: 1 Votes
13 weeks ago

Are you saying that Mountain Lion would run worse on new hardware than Mavericks would? The newer OS is nearly always slower. By the way, Apple claimed Mavericks would be faster on my computer. I'm not going to spend money just to support Mavericks when Mountain Lion does the same job for less… and with color labels.


I'm saying that anyone that complains about system performance that is still running a spinning platter has no leg to stand on.

Also, your perception that Mountain Lion does everything Mavericks does is simply untrue. Check the API differences. Many, many apps require Mavericks for those API's (just check the App Store: Pixelmator, Omnifocus 2, Final Cut, Sunrise Calendar, OneNote, etc.).

For any actions that you can still use ML for, there will be more in the future that begin to require Mavs. Just ask any developer.

Furthermore, you can expect to need to upgrade your hardware just the same for Yosemite performance, so you might as well do it now. You're only delaying the inevitable.
Rating: 1 Votes
13 weeks ago

It's supposed to "run out of RAM". Empty RAM doesn't do you any good.


That's right. Free memory is wasted memory. Mavericks is supposed to use all of the available memory and IMO it's wonderful, best memory management I've seen since Leopard days.
Rating: 1 Votes

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