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iPhone and iPod Engineering VP David Tupman Leaves Apple

Apple's vice president for iPhone and iPod engineering David Tupman has left the company, according to 9to5Mac. While not a member of the senior executive team, Tupman spent a decade at Apple and has been considered to be one of the key iOS hardware executives reporting to senior vice president Bob Mansfield.
Weeks before the introduction of the first iPod, Apple hired Tupman, and he soon became Apple’s vice president of iPod engineering.

He had a big hand in the development and success of every iPod released to date, and when it was time to build the iPhone, Tupman joined the team behind that product, too. As Apple shifted its engineering resources to its mobile line of products, Tupman was named Vice President of iPod and iPhone Engineering— a major role at Apple. Besides playing a major part in growing Apple’s mobile device business into one of the most successful businesses ever, Tupman has his name on at around 70 Apple technology patents, such as power and battery life management, noise-canceling ear buds, Apple’s tiny iPhone power adapters, and mobile device interaction with accessories.
Tupman's future plans remain unknown, although we understand that he has been taking some personal time following his long term of service at Apple.

Apple is said to be searching internally for Tupman's replacement, but has apparently not yet named a successor.

Top Rated Comments

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Posted: 34 months ago
I spent 5 years working at a Fortune 500 company and then quit, couldn't stand it anymore. It actually was a good job, I got paid a ton of money, and it was a great working environment and I worked with really great people. Point is, it's just hard to work at the same place and do the same thing for many years, no matter how cool it is. At some point you want a change, want to try something new. That point comes at different times for different people, but expecting people to stay at a company for their entire career is pretty unrealistic these days, that happened in the 1950s but is very rare now.
Rating: 10 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago
Nice to see macrumors burying this story.

I guess it's not as big as Patent lawsuit #1056 or a fast food place buying iPads.
Rating: 6 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago

Interesting. Why are these Apple employees leaving when they have such momentum going?


Some would say "quit while you're ahead". Others would say "turnover happens". I really don't think there's anything to suggest a panic / abandon ship event.
Rating: 5 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago
Maybe they make him put crazy amounts of time in, and he just can't sacrifice anymore family time.

Just my whacky theory for today.
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago

That's a joke.... right?
At least, tell me you're not referring to the beast that is 30-pin... right?
Because it's one of the largest phone power/sync adapters on the market!
(Especially with nearly all other manufacturers standardizing to micro-usb.)


They're talking about the power adapter (i.e. the part that goes into the plug), not the standard apple connector for iOS devices.
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago
Maybe he actually does want personal time? I could retire on his money, I'm sure. But it never is that way, is it?
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago

Nice to see macrumors burying this story.

I guess it's not as big as Patent lawsuit #1056 or a fast food place buying iPads.


Yes, I'm concerned about the direction of MR articles lately.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago

I spent 5 years working at a Fortune 500 company and then quit, couldn't stand it anymore. It actually was a good job, I got paid a ton of money, and it was a great working environment and I worked with really great people. Point is, it's just hard to work at the same place and do the same thing for many years, no matter how cool it is. At some point you want a change, want to try something new. That point comes at different times for different people, but expecting people to stay at a company for their entire career is pretty unrealistic these days, that happened in the 1950s but is very rare now.


Excellent points. I would add that 10 years at Apple, especially in his role, is similar to 20 years at most other Fortune 500's. :apple:
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago
See people. This is why issuing stock to executives is important. Maybe if they had tossed 200,000 shares to this guy with a cash in date of 2021, he'd stick around for a while.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 34 months ago

After all that has come out about the inherent culture of mistrust that new hires are met with I would imagine that working for Apple takes a toll on a person.


Hah. That's funny. The fact that Apple doesn't trust every newcomer before they prove themselves is going to make a 10+ year veteran of the company leave?

You should start a comedy club.

jW
Rating: 2 Votes

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