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'iPhoto' How Tos

How to Migrate Pictures from iPhoto or Aperture to Photos for OS X

With the launch of OS X 10.10.3 Yosemite, Apple released its much-anticipated Photos app, which was first announced during its Worldwide Developers Conference in 2014. The Photos for OS X app took several months to complete because it was designed from the ground up to work with OS X Yosemite and integrate with both the Photos for iOS app and iCloud Photo Library. Because Photos for OS X replaces both of Apple's existing photo apps, Aperture and iPhoto, you're going to need to migrate your Aperture and iPhoto libraries into the new Photos app if you want to be able to use Apple's latest and greatest photo editing tools with your images. The migration from iPhoto or Aperture to Photos actually happens automatically if you only have one library in your Pictures folder. However, you may have more than one photo library on your Mac if you've split your iPhoto library up or if you use both iPhoto and Aperture, which makes things a little more difficult. You may need some help figuring out how to manually migrate additional libraries, so we've created a handy guide to explain how to get those other libraries into Photos quickly and easily. One quick note: Before you migrate all of your existing photos into Photos for OS X, make sure you have enough iCloud storage space if you want to take advantage of iCloud Photo Library, which syncs your images across al of your devices. With iCloud Photo Library turned on in the Photos app, all of your images will be uploaded to the cloud, which does eat up your iCloud storage space. You can use Photos without iCloud Photo Library

'iPhoto' Articles

Discontinued Apple Software Returns to 'Purchased' Tab in Mac App Store

Earlier today, we noted Apple had recently removed older versions of OS X and other discontinued software from the Purchased tab of the Mac App Store for users who had previously purchased or downloaded them. The apps, which included Aperture, iPhoto, OS X Lion, OS X Mountain Lion and OS X Mavericks, have now returned to the Purchased tab. The disappearance of the ability to re-download older software irked users, with some calling the action "user hostile." It's unclear if Apple pulled the software intentionally or whether the Mac App Store experienced a temporary bug in advance of the availability of OS X El Capitan. However, the software was unavailable for several days before returning tonight. Only one of the apps, Aperture, will continue to be compatible with OS X El Capitan. Update: As noted by several readers, some discontinued software including Logic Pro 9 and older versions of OS X Server remain unavailable for re-download from the Purchased tab. Thanks, Matthew!

Apple Pulls Older Software From 'Purchased' Tab in Mac App Store

Apple recently removed older versions of OS X and other discontinued software from the Purchased tab of users who had previously purchased or downloaded them. With the change, it is no longer possible for users to download Aperture, iPhoto, OS X Lion, OS X Mountain Lion, and OS X Mavericks from the Mac App Store. The decision to disallow users from downloading the older software is not going over well on reddit, where commenters are calling Apple's decision "user-hostile."That's really unfortunate and hostile by Apple. What about people who use older operating systems due to compatibility problems with specific software? I recently had to re-install Mavericks, but didn't keep the "Install OS X Mavericks" app. Now my only chance of getting it again is to download it from another location, and I don't know whether that image has been compromised.It is not clear if Apple's decision to prevent users from downloading older software from the Mac App Store is a temporary bug or a permanent change. The software has, however, been unavailable for several days now. It's possible Apple is aiming to prevent people from downloading software that is outdated and unsupported, but at least one of the now-inaccessible apps, Aperture, continues to work on OS X El

How Photos for OS X Handles Content and Metadata Migration from iPhoto and Aperture

Last week, Apple released OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 with support for the new Photos for OS X app, the company's replacement for both iPhoto and Aperture; Apple also removed both apps from the Mac App Store shortly after Photos was released. Today, Apple released a support document detailing exactly what users can expect when they migrate their content from Aperture and iPhoto to Photos. When iPhoto content (photos and video) and metadata are migrated over to Photos, they do so without changes. Images migrate over with the adjustments that were applied within iPhoto. Users will not be able to alter the images, but they will be able to revert to the original photo before adjustments were applied. Slideshows and Albums are both preserved in Photos with a few exceptions. Slideshows that use themes not available in Photos have the default theme attached to them, while Smart Albums where none of its Smart Album criteria are supported by Photos are not migrated over. Keywords are preserved in Photos, and most metadata is migrated over, but there are some exceptions. Some IPTC metadata like Copyright are still attached to works, but they won't be visible within Photos. They can still be viewed in programs that recognize and display the select IPTC data, like iPhoto and Aperture. Finally, Events are transferred to an album called iPhoto Events in the Album View section of Photos for OS X. Aperture's migration of content and metadata works similar to iPhoto, but with a few significant differences. Aperture projects and subfolders migrate to folders called Aperture Projects

Aperture and iPhoto Removed From Mac App Store Following Photos for OS X Launch

Following Wednesday's release of OS X 10.10.3 and the new Photos for OS X app, Apple has, as promised, removed Aperture and iPhoto from the Mac App Store. Apple warned that development would stop on the two photo editing apps in the middle of last year, and put notices in the Mac App Store a couple months ago to let users know the apps would be pulled from sale following the launch of Photos. The two apps remained available for download from the Mac App Store for approximately a day after Photos for OS X was released, but attempting to access them via search now gives no results and clicking through from an external Mac App Store link gives an "Item Not Available" message. Apple has ceased development on Aperture and iPhoto to concentrate its resources on Photos for OS X, its new photo editing software that integrates with the Photos for iOS app and iCloud Photo Library to let users access their complete set of photos on any device. Photos for OS X has been described by many as an excellent replacement for iPhoto, as it includes more advanced tools and it runs much faster. Aperture users may find Photos for OS X lacking, however, as it does not have advanced tools like a loupe or brushable adjustments. It also does not support plugins.

Apple Updates iPhoto for Mac to Prepare for Upcoming Transition to New Photos App

Apple today released a minor update for the iPhoto app for Mac to prepare for the upcoming transition to the OS X Photos app. According to the release notes, today's update improves compatibility when migrating iPhoto libraries to the new Photos app available in OS X 10.10.3.What's new -Improves compatibility when migrating iPhoto libraries to the new Photos app in the OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 (available this spring) -Fixes an issue that caused iPhoto to display only the first 25 images in a Facebook album -Fixes an issue that could cause iPhoto to become unresponsive when printing an imageAs we have known for months, the upcoming Photos for OS X app for the Mac is designed to be a replacement for iPhoto and Aperture, both of which Apple ceased developing last year. Photos for OS X is an all new photo management app that's been designed to integrate deeply with Photos for iOS. It introduces a Yosemite-style design that emphasizes flatness and translucency, and it works alongside iCloud Photo Library, streamlining photo availability across all of a user's devices. Reviews of the Photos for OS X app have suggested that it's a vast improvement over iPhoto, with better photo editing tools and faster speeds, but it has been criticized for lacking many of the professional editing tools that were found within Aperture. It is not clear when OS X 10.10.3 with the Photos app might see a public release, but thus far, the software is available to both developers and public beta testers. Developers have received four OS X 10.10.3 betas, and public beta testers have had

Apple Launches iPhoto for iPad with Photo Editing and Organization Features

With the introduction of a Retina display on the new iPad, Apple has updated all of its stock applications to support the higher resolution, also adding updates to several of its applications including GarageBand and iMovie. But the company has also filled out the remainder of its iPad versions of its iLife suite with the launch of iPhoto for iPad, a new application offering photo editing capabilities right on the device. iPhoto for iPad offers a broad array of photo editing and comparison features, including auto-enhancements such as straightening photos and fixing contrast. Brush palettes offer a number of editing tools including red-eye removal, lighten, sharpen, soften, and darken. iPhoto can handle images up to 19 megapixels.iPhoto, Apple’s popular photography app, has been completely reimagined for iOS to take full advantage of the Retina display and intuitive Multi-Touch gestures on iPad and iPhone. Simple gestures can be used to select and compare photos side by side and flag your best shots. iPhoto gives you full control over color, exposure and contrast, and you simply touch the parts of the image you want to change. You can enhance pictures by adding beautiful Apple-designed effects with just a tap, or apply adjustments exactly where you want them with fingertip brushes. In addition to posting photos to Facebook, Flickr and Twitter, you can beam photos between your iPhone and iPad; stream photos and slideshows to your Apple TV with AirPlay; and use iCloud to publish photo journals to the web and share your stories with friends and family in a whole new