emoji


'emoji' Articles

Today is the 10th Anniversary of Emoji on iPhone

On November 21, 2008, Apple released iPhone OS 2.2 to users in Japan, introducing an emoji keyboard and emoji characters for the first time ever on an iPhone. At the time, the latest iPhone to be released was the iPhone 3G, which launched in June 2008 with iPhone OS 2. The emoji keyboard in 2008 (left) vs 2018 (right), via Jeremy Burge/Emojipedia Emojipedia has provided an in-depth look today at the first iPhone emojis, explaining that despite Apple's decision to restrict the emoji keyboard to Japan in iPhone OS 2.2, some apps unlocked the keyboard for users outside of Japan. This was the first time that third-party apps were even available on iPhone, since iPhone OS 2.2 also introduced the App Store. The launch within iPhone OS 2.2 predated emoji support in the Unicode Standard, which now makes the characters universally interchangeable between devices and operating systems. Apple's 2008 emoji implementation was based on the set used by Japanese carrier Softbank, and the influence on many of these designs is clear. Even moreso—much the the chagrin of some—Apple's emoji font has gone on to dominate public expectation of what an emoji should look like. While Apple does not dictate which emojis are approved by Unicode, it is reasonable to wonder that without Apple's strong color emoji support in these earlier years, whether we would see it as the cultural phenomenon it has become today. Emojis then gained traction in iOS 4 and Mac OS X Lion, but these were still not widely supported across regions. Not until iOS 5 in 2011 did Apple introduce the emoji keyboard

New 2019 Emoji Candidates Include Service Dog, Deaf Person and More Couples

The Unicode Consortium is working on the list of emojis that will be added to Unicode 12 in 2019, and today Emojipedia shared some details on new emoji candidates that have been suggested for inclusion. New candidates for Unicode 12 include service dog, deaf people, and mixed race couples. Because the list of emojis has not yet been finalized, these new emoji candidates won't be included for sure, but they could make their way onto various platforms that support emoji if the Unicode Consortium ultimately approves them. These new emoji candidate suggestions join other emoji suggested for 2019, including diving mask, waffle, Hindu temple, white heart, ice cube, sloth, flamingo, skunk, ballet shoes, falafel, onion, garlic, otter, and more. A full list of Unicode 12 emoji candidates is available from Emojipedia. Apple will likely add the Unicode 12 emoji to iOS, macOS, and Apple Watch devices sometime in the fall of 2019. At the current time, we're waiting on the addition of Unicode 11 emojis, which Apple said it will add to iOS later this year. Apple previewed many of the new emoji that it plans to add, including red hair, gray hair, curly hair, cold face, party face, face with hearts, superheroes, kangaroo, peacock, parrot, lobster, mango, lettuce, cupcake, and more. A few proposals have been made for emojis coming in 2020 and were announced by the Unicode Consortium today, including ninja, military helmet, mammoth, feather, dodo, magic wand, carpentry saw, and screwdriver. Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this

Apple Highlights Upcoming 2018 Emoji in Celebration of World Emoji Day

World Emoji Day kicks off on July 17, and in celebration of the event, Apple today shared details on new emoji that are coming to iOS devices "later this year" as part of the Unicode 11 emoji release. Apple plans to introduce 70 new emoji characters later this year, with new options for red hair, gray hair, curly hair, and no hair, along with smiley faces that include cold face, party face, pleading face, and face with hearts. Super heroes, an eye-shaped nazar amulet, and an infinity symbol will be added, along with new animals such as kangaroo, peacock, parrot, and lobster. New food items include mango, lettuce, cupcake, and moon cake. A full list of the emoji included in Unicode 11 are listed on the Emojipedia site, and Emojipedia was also able to interview Alan Dye, Apple's VP of User Interface Design to get some insight into how Apple designs new emoji. According to Dye, when designing new emoji characters, Apple aims for a design that's "the most iconic" and "the most timeless representation" of the item in question. There's no specific formula, though, behind the look of each individual emoji. "Without a doubt, we want it to always feel like an Apple emoji and that's what we're going for, but we really make that decision on a case by case basis," Dye said. Apple often discusses adding more diverse options, such as emojis for black families, but it's a challenge to come up with an appropriate interface. "I think that you need a UI that can accommodate the variations," Dye told Emojipedia. All of the new emoji Apple shared today will be

Apple's New Memoji vs. Samsung's AR Emoji

After Apple unveiled Animoji when the iPhone X debuted last September, Samsung introduced its own version, the more human-like and customizable AR Emoji. Not to be outdone, Apple in iOS 12 introduced Memoji, a new version of Animoji that can be customized to look just like you. Given the similarities between AR Emoji and Memoji, we thought we'd compare the two and give our readers an idea of what to expect when iOS 12 launches this fall. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Memoji, available in the Messages app and FaceTime on iOS 12, are cartoon-like customizable emoji characters that animate just like Animoji using the TrueDepth camera system in the iPhone X. Because Animoji and Memoji require Apple's 3D camera capabilities to mimic facial expressions, the feature is limited to the iPhone X. Future devices, including 2018 iPad Pro models and iPhones are rumored to be adopting Face ID though. Samsung's AR Emoji are also limited and available only on Galaxy S9 devices. Apple's Memoji feature offers up a blank face with a range of customizable options like skin color, hair color, hair style, head shape, eye shape and color, eye brows, nose and lips, ears, and facial hair and freckles. All of these feature options can be combined to create a range of Memoji with different looks, and you can save dozens of Memoji creations. While Apple starts you off with a blank face that can be customized to your liking, Samsung's AR Emoji feature has an option to scan your face and automatically create an emoji likeness of you that can then be

2019 Emoji Candidates Include Flamingo, White Heart, Diving Mask, Axe, and More

Ahead of the impending arrival of Unicode 11 on June 5, Emojipedia today published an article about all of the emoji characters that will be launching on Apple devices later this year. While these characters were known, the site also looked forward a bit and briefly detailed what users can expect from Unicode 12 coming in March 2019. On the short list for impending release in 2019 are the Flamingo and White Heart, which are the two "most requested" emojis by Emojipedia readers this year. Otherwise, the following emoji candidates have been drafted for potential launch next year: Diving Mask, Axe, Waffle, Diya Lamp, and Hindu Temple. All of these candidates have also received mockups, seen below, except Waffle. 2019 Emoji concepts via Emojipedia At this time, these emojis are still only candidates for inclusion in Unicode 12, "and no decisions have been made about the final emoji list for 2019." Emojipedia has been expanding the Unicode 12 candidates list over the past few weeks, now including characters like Yawning Face, Ballet Shoes, Sloth, Butter, Stethoscope, Ringed Planet, and more. For Unicode 11 in 2018, users can expect social media companies to adopt the new emojis sometime over the summer, while Apple and other smartphone makers will likely add all of the new characters into OS updates in the fall. As a reminder, some of the new emojis include Parrot, Llama, Lobster, Softball, Kangaroo, Partying Face, and more. Check out a glimpse below: Emojis coming in 2018 If going by traditional releases, Apple should add in these new characters to iOS, macOS,

Apple Submits New Accessibility Emojis to Unicode Consortium

Apple today submitted a new proposal [PDF] to the Unicode Consortium, suggesting the committee introduce a series of accessibility emojis in future Unicode releases. As outlined by Emojipedia, Apple has suggested emojis that include a guide dog, a hearing aid, a prosthetic arm and leg, sign language, a person in a wheelchair, and a person with a cane. Apple's full list of proposed emojis can be seen in its proposal document. Image via Emojipedia In its proposal, Apple says it is aiming to better represent individuals with disabilities to provide a more inclusive experience for all. Apple also says this is not an exhaustive list of "all possible depictions of disabilities," but is rather designed to be "an initial starting point."At Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs. Adding emoji emblematic to users' life experiences helps foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability. Emoji are a universal language and a powerful tool for communication, as well as a form of self-expression, and can be used not only to represent one's own personal experience, but also to show support for a loved one. This new set of emoji that we are proposing aims to provide a wider array of options to represent basic categories for people with disabilities. This is not meant to be a comprehensive list of all possible depictions of disabilities, but to provide an initial starting point for greater representation for diversity within the emoji universe.To create the emoji suggestions, Apple

Here Are 150+ New Emoji Coming to iPhones and iPads Later This Year

The Unicode Consortium today announced it has finalized a new set of 157 emoji that companies like Apple will be able to implement later this year. There are actually only 77 new emoji in total, as some have multiple skin tones. Jeremy Burge, who runs the popular emoji-themed website Emojipedia, has shared sample images of every new emoji in an Apple-like style to show how they might look on devices like the iPhone, iPad, and Mac. Emoji 11.0 will include several new hairstyles and types, including male and female faces with red hair, curly hair, gray hair at a younger age, and no hair or baldness, along with hot and cold faces, and woozy and pleading faces. Other notable inclusions are new male and female superhero and supervillain options, a face with a party hat, and emojis for well-known activities such as sewing, knitting, lacrosse, softball, frisbee, chess, and skateboarding. New animals and insects include a kangaroo, parrot, peacock, swan, badger, llama, lobster, hippopotamus, raccoon, and mosquito. New food options include a bagel, lettuce, mango, and cupcake, among others, while new objects range from a fire extinguisher and test tube to a toilet paper roll and sponge. There's even a pirate flag and an infinity symbol. Emoji 11.0 will be part of the Unicode 11.0 standard, scheduled for release this June. The new emoji typically start showing up on mobile devices in August or September, so expect to see them on iPhones and iPads around iOS 12. The new emojis should extend to the Mac and Apple Watch at some point too. Next up will be

Developers Report Recent Enforcement of Stricter Rules for Emoji Use in iOS Apps

Over the past few weeks, iOS app developers have been sharing stories on Twitter about their apps getting rejected by Apple's App Review team because emojis were used in "non-keyboard based situations." So if an app displayed an emoji in its user interface, where the user did not type it in with a keyboard, Apple said it was not complying with its trademark and Apple Emoji imagery guidelines. As accounts of similar situations begin to build, Emojipedia this week reported on the topic, and attempted to make sense of the new rules, with a handful of examples of apps that have been using emoji within their UI and are now being rejected by Apple. In the iOS app "Reaction Match," a Game Center error screen saw the use of the loudly crying face and alien emojis become problems for developer Eddie Lee. He eventually removed all instances of the emojis, and the App Store reviewers then accepted the app. Image of Reaction Match's rejected (left) and approved (right) app screens via Emojipedia Github client app GitHawk faced similar issues, with Apple rejecting the app for its use of emojis as "media" in various parts of the app. As developer and software engineer Ryan Nystrom explained, these instances of "non text input" emoji use got flagged, but once he removed the emojis and used them only as "content" and as text input examples, the app was approved. Approved it, shouldn't use emoji as "media" (the Inbox Zero screen), but as "content" its ok pic.twitter.com/JWHwv3ZgNa— Ryan Nystrom (@_ryannystrom) January 23, 2018 Like other newly discovered App Store guidelines,

Former Apple Intern Looks Back at Designing First Apple Emoji in 2008

Back in 2008, Angela Guzman was a graphic design student at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and an intern at Apple, where she joined the iPhone team and worked alongside another Apple designer, Raymond, to come up with the first 500 emoji characters that were available on the iPhone. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of her internship, Guzman has taken a look back at her time at Apple and her work on emoji in an interesting retrospective shared on Medium. Image via Angela Guzman When Guzman was handed the emoji project at Apple, it came at a time when emoji were unfamiliar in the English speaking world. Guzman received a crash course in Apple design and then started designing emoji, which featured incredible detail even right from the start. Then Apple CEO Steve Jobs reviewed each batch of emoji before it was approved for launch.Regardless of how fast I could crank one out, I constantly checked the details: the direction of the woodgrain, how freckles appeared on apples and eggplants, how leaf veins ran on a hibiscus, how leather was stitched on a football, the details were neverending. I tried really hard to capture all this in every pixel, zooming in and zooming out, because every detail mattered.Some emoji, says Guzman, have interesting back stories. The happy poop swirl, for example, was reused as the top of the ice cream cone. Harder, more detailed emoji were left last, such as the now-iconic dancer with the red dress. Guzman's emoji were first launched in Japan in November of 2008, and in the time since then, emoji have changed the way we

iMessage Has Emoji-Related Bug Dating Back Several iOS Versions

Apple released iOS 11.2.1 on Wednesday with multiple bug fixes, but an emoji-related issue continues to affect the Messages app on iOS devices. The bug happens as follows: start a fresh conversation with a new recipient in the Messages app, send a single emoji as the first message, and much of the interface will essentially go blank with the top menu disappearing. The glitch effectively renders the Messages app unusable until it is force closed and reopened through the multitasking menu. The bug has affected most iPhone, iPad, and likely iPod touch models since at least iOS 11.1.2. MacRumors is able to reproduce the issue on iOS 11.2, iOS 11.2.1, and the first iOS 11.2.5 beta released yesterday. The issue is prevalent in both iMessage conversations with blue bubbles and SMS conversations with green bubbles. While this bug is a minor one, it adds to a growing list of issues that have surfaced over the past several versions of iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra, including a major Mac vulnerability that provided easy access to the root superuser. Beyond the root bug, Apple has also dealt with a HomeKit-related vulnerability, an iPhone camera autofocus issue, iOS autocorrect bugs, and iPhone X glitches in cold weather, among other problems, in recent weeks. We've alerted Apple about this bug shortly prior to publishing this article and we'll provide an update if and when we learn about a

Apple May Add Reversible Emoji in iOS 12 and macOS 10.14 Next Year

The Unicode Consortium has proposed new guidelines that would allow for reversible emoji. In other words, emojis such as a car or train that currently face to the left or right only would be able to face either direction. Reversible emoji mockup via Emojipedia Apple and other vendors would be able to choose which emoji can be reversible on their devices, if any, according to their preferences. The guidelines are still a draft that should be finalized by time the next major batch of over 100 new emoji characters are made available for companies like Apple to implement starting in the second half of 2018. The Unicode Consortium has also introduced a handful of new emoji candidates for the second half of 2018, including a swan, badger, infinity, and pirate flag, according to Jeremy Burge at Emojipedia.org. Unfortunately, for true emoji aficionados, it looks like "Frowning Pile Of Poo" and two other faces haven't made the cut for the next batch. Emoji 11.0, proposed earlier this year, currently includes 130 new emoji candidates. Some notable inclusions are faces with red hair, faces with no hair, faces with curly or afro hairstyles, and hot and cold faces. Other candidates include new superheroes, a firecracker, a fire extinguisher, a test tube, a lacrosse stick with ball, a softball, and a bagel. The timeline means that iPhones and iPads could support both the new and reversible emoji in iOS 12 or iOS 12.1 around September to November of next year. The new batch should extend to the Mac as well in a future macOS update. The emoji included in this

Apple Says 'Face With Tears of Joy' is Most Popular Emoji in United States Among English Speakers

Apple has revealed that "face with tears of joy" is the most popular emoji among English speakers in the United States. The face topped Apple's list of the top 10 emoji, ahead of a red heart, loudly crying face, heart eyes face, face throwing a kiss, face with rolling eyes, skull, smiling face with smiling eyes, weary face, and thinking face. Apple's chart isn't labeled, much to the disappointment of anyone who was desperately seeking emoji statistics. Apple's list of the top 10 emoji is mostly consistent with public data available from Emojipedia and EmojiTracker, with the skull being an exception, according to Unicode's Emoji Subcommittee vice-chair Jeremy Burge. Apple shared the chart in a recently published overview of its differential privacy technology on macOS Sierra and iOS 10 and later, which allows the company to collect and aggregate anonymized data from a large number of users while preserving the privacy of individual users.The differential privacy technology used by Apple is rooted in the idea that statistical noise that is slightly biased can mask a user's individual data before it is shared with Apple. If many people are submitting the same data, the noise that has been added can average out over large numbers of data points, and Apple can see meaningful information emerge.Apple says it uses local differential privacy to help protect the privacy of user activity in a given time period, while still gaining insight that improves the intelligence and usability of iOS and macOS features such as: • QuickType suggestions • Emoji suggestions

Frowning Poo and 66 Other New Emojis Proposed for Potential Release in 2018's Unicode 11

While the new emojis of Unicode 10 have yet to launch, Unicode President Mark Davis this week revealed a collection of new emojis have been added as "draft candidates" for potential release in Unicode 11 in 2018 (via Emojipedia). The news came out of the quarterly Unicode Technical Committee meeting, and up next the Unicode Consortium will decide on the list of final candidates at its Q4 2017 meeting in October, followed by naming the new characters at a meeting in Q1 2018. Emoji images via EmojiXpress, Emojipedia, and Unicode.org The 67 new characters proposed for inclusion in Unicode 11 include smiling face with three hearts, smiling face with party hat, blue face with icicles, grinning face with OK as eyes, and an inversion of the well-known poo emoji called "frowning pile of poo." There's also kangaroo, cupcake, llama, bagel, broom, skateboard, softball, smiling face with cape, and serious face with eye mask and cape. Since Unicode 11 is still so far from release, the list of its included characters and their designs are subject to change. 📝 🌱 Recommendations from the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee for 2018 #UTC152 https://t.co/NQmEZzmkqt pic.twitter.com/I86zmDbWjn— Jeremy Burge 🐥 (@jeremyburge) August 4, 2017 Closer to release is Unicode 10, which Apple highlighted last month during World Emoji Day by looking at a few of the emojis coming to iOS, macOS, and watchOS later in 2017. New emojis include Woman with Headscarf, Bearded Person, Breastfeeding, Sandwich, Coconut, T-Rex, Zebra, Zombie, Elf, Star-Struck, Exploding Head, and more. Apple didn't specify

Apple Highlights New Batch of Emoji Coming to iOS, macOS, and watchOS Later This Year

After first giving iTunes an emoji-themed makeover, Apple is continuing its celebration of World Emoji Day with a preview of all-new emoji characters coming to iOS, macOS, and watchOS later in 2017. The new emoji previewed today by Apple include Woman with Headscarf, Bearded Person, Breastfeeding, Sandwich, Coconut, T-Rex, Zebra, Zombie, Elf, Star-Struck, Exploding Head, and more. All of the emoji shared today were previously included in the new Unicode 10 standard released in June. The new emoji make it easier for users to express themselves with greater diversity, additional animals and creatures, new smiley faces and more. Apple didn't specify a launch date for the new line of emoji characters coming to iPhones, iPads, Macs, and Apple Watches this year, but it's expected that they will arrive sometime around the public launch of iOS 11 this fall, or soon thereafter. World Emoji Day celebrations are also extending to the iOS App Store, where Apple said that it has highlighted apps that showcase fun things to do with the smartphone

Apple Celebrates World Emoji Day With an Emoji-Themed Makeover for iTunes Movies

Today, July 17, is celebrated as World Emoji Day thanks to this day being marked on the iOS "calendar" emoji. In celebration, Apple has updated the iTunes Movies storefront with a new emoji-filled carousel that uses the popular smartphone characters to describe recent film releases, as well as older movies. Some of the films referenced include Kong: Skull Island, Beauty and the Beast, Get Out, Stephen King's It, Logan, Arrival, and more. The iTunes emoji makeover is simply a visual overhaul of the store with no sale prices appearing on any of the participating films. Apple often updates the iTunes Movies storefront to coincide with new film releases, most recently offering a LEGO makeover to celebrate the digital release of The LEGO Batman Movie. Earlier in June, a few decade-based film collections were put on sale on iTunes to give users the chance to get bundles of films together at lower prices. (Thanks, Kenneth!)

T-Rex, Vampire, Crazy Face, Zombie, Giraffe, and Pie Among Emoji Included in New Unicode 10 Standard

The Unicode Consortium today released version 10.0.0 of the Unicode Standard, introducing 56 new emoji characters ranging from crazy face and face with monocle to t-rex, pie, and pretzel. Emoji site Emojipedia has details on all of the new emoji that are included in the update, and has shared a sample image featuring visual representations of the new additions. Some of the new emoji include star-struck, face with raised eyebrow (which Emojipedia says is also known as the "Colbert" face), exploding head, face vomiting, shushing face, face with hand over mouth, love you gesture, palms up together, brain, orange heart, scarf, gloves, coat, socks, zebra, giraffe, hedgehog, sauropod, cricket, coconut, broccoli, dumpling, fortune cookie, pie, cup with straw, and chopsticks. New child, adult, and older adult emojis in a range of skin tones are included, as are options for person in steamy room, bearded person, mage, fairy, vampire, merperson, elf, genie, person climbing, person in lotus position, and more, with all of those emoji available in multiple skin tones and genders. While there are 56 distinct new emoji characters, gender/skin tone modifiers and flags bring that total to 239. These new emoji will not be available for Apple products until Apple adds support for Unicode 10, and the actual artwork for each emoji on iOS and Mac devices will be up to Apple to provide. It typically takes Apple several months to implement support for new emoji, so the Unicode 10 options could be implemented in the fall of 2017. Emoji in Unicode 9, which was released in June of

Unicode Proposes Regional Emoji Flags for Next Year

The Unicode Consortium has announced a proposed update to its emoji documentation that provides support for regional flag emojis. As noted by Emojipedia, the new functionality and guidelines would allow for Apple and other vendors to implement emojis for regions such as U.S. states, Canadian provinces and territories, or countries of the United Kingdom. Flags representing California or Texas, for example, or England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, could be added in a future iOS update. The Unicode Consortium stopped short of recommending specific flags for vendors to support, and it said there is no requirement that any of the regional flags be supported. In other words, Apple in particular would be free to choose which regional flags to add to its iOS and macOS platforms if any. Emojipedia said the Emoji 5.0 update is likely to be released in the first half of 2017, although an official date has not been specified. The proposed update is currently available for public review and feedback until January 16, 2017. Some apps such as WhatsApp have already worked around the existing Unicode standards to support flags for England, Scotland, Wales, and other

T-Rex, Hedgehog, Sandwich, Vampire and Zombie Among Emoji Proposed for 2017's Unicode 10

The Unicode Consortium today published the list of proposed emoji that could potentially be included in Unicode 10, set to be released in 2017, giving us a first glimpse at the emojis we might see included in future iOS updates. Today's proposal includes 51 emoji candidates [PDF], including flying saucer, shocked face with exploding head, face with open mouth vomiting, grinning face with star eyes, coconut, broccoli, pie, pretzel, sandwich, t-rex, giraffe face, sauropod (basically a brontosaurus), hedgehog, mage, vampire, fairy, elf, genie, zombie, and tons more. Image via Emojipedia Emoji candidates are often chosen for multiple reasons, ranging from expected high frequency of use to requests from online communities. Others fill in gaps in existing emoji sets or are compatible with current emoji characters. The Unicode 10 emoji candidates are not yet finalized, so it is possible some of the characters on the list could be eliminated. We may also see new emoji additions before Unicode 10 is finalized in 2017. With emoji growing in popularity, Apple has started adopting new emojis more frequently. iOS 10.2 includes support for Unicode 9 emoji, introducing characters like clown face, drooling face, selfie, face palm, fox face, avocado, bacon, and croissant, along with dozens of profession emoji. Unicode 9 was first approved in June of 2016, so we can perhaps expect to see Apple adopt Unicode 10 within six months of its

72 New Emoji Including Bacon, Shrug, Selfie and Face Palm Coming in Unicode 9

The Unicode Consortium recently approved 72 new emoji for inclusion in Unicode 9, set to be released on June 21. New emoji range from expanded smileys and people to new animals, food, and sports. Notable smileys include rolling on the floor laughing, drooling face, and nauseated face, while the people/body category gains shrug, selfie, and face palm. New animal emoji include gorilla, fox face, deer, shark, and owl, and some of the new foods include avocado, potato, croissant, pancakes, salad, and bacon. There are a line of new medals, objects like a scooter and a canoe, and emoji to represent boxing gloves, martial arts uniforms, wrestlers, fencing, juggling, and more. Emojipedia has shared mockups and a full list of upcoming emoji. The emoji above serve as simple mockups and are not representative of what the actual emoji will look like on various devices, but Emojipedia has created them in the Apple style. Apple and Google's designers will actually custom design emoji based on the Unicode Consortium's guidelines for each character, crafting them to fit in with existing emoji. Though the Unicode Consortium is releasing Unicode 9 on June 21, the new emoji will not be available on iOS and Mac devices until Apple implements support for them, which can sometimes take several months. Apple currently supports Unicode 8, which introduced emoji like taco, burrito, unicorn face, and popcorn, along with emoji skin tone modifiers. With the release of Unicode 9 on the horizon, the Unicode Consortium has already begun considering candidates for Unicode 10, with

Apple Supports Anti-Bullying Campaign With New iOS 9.1 Emoji Symbol

In betas of iOS 9.1 and OS X 10.11.1, Apple added a mysterious emoji symbol consisting of an eye inside of a speech bubble. At the time, it was not clear what purpose the mystery emoji served, but as Wired points out, it's Apple's way of supporting an anti-bullying campaign launched today by the Ad Council. The "I Am A Witness" digital anti-bullying campaign aims to empower teenagers to speak up whenever they see bullying, with the emoji Apple implemented serving as a way to show support for someone who is being bullied. Two designers at ad agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, Angie Elko and Patrick Knowlton, came up with the eye-in-a-speech bubble symbol, and then the ad agency approached Apple to add it as an emoji to the Apple Keyboard. According to Goodby art director Hanna Wittmark, Apple was a fan of the symbol."When we first asked about bringing this emoji to the official Apple keyboard, they told us it would take at least a year or two to get it through and approved under Unicode," says Wittmark. The company found a way to fast-track it, she says, by combining two existing emoji.To create the new anti-bullying emoji, Apple combined the eye emoji with the left speech bubble emoji using what's called a Zero Width Joiner, described on Emojipedia as a unicode character that's able to join two or more characters together. It's also used in emoji like the family, combining Man, Woman, Girl, and Boy emoji to create a single character emoji. Image via Jeremy Burge of Emojipedia The emoji is a key symbol in the campaign and is available on iPhones running iOS