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'Dropbox' Articles

Dropbox's Free Storage Plan Now Limited to Three Devices

Dropbox users who have a free Dropbox account are now limited to using that account on a total of three devices, according to new information added to the Dropbox website and spotted on Twitter (via The Verge). Dropbox says that as of March 2019, "Basic" users, which is the free tier, can add their account to three devices. Dropbox users who already have their account attached to more than three devices can keep them linked, but there will be no way to link additional devices when over the three device limit. There has long been a free tier for Dropbox users, with no restrictions other than available storage space. The new three device limit will make Dropbox's free service less appealing to users, though it could spur upgrades. To get unlimited device syncing, Dropbox users will now have to upgrade to a "Plus" or "Professional" Dropbox account. Plus is priced at $9.99 per month for 1TB of storage, while Professional costs $19.99 per month for 2TB of storage. There are discounts available when purchasing a yearly plan,

Dropbox Increases Storage Space for Professional and Business Standard Customers

Dropbox today announced that it is increasing the amount of storage space available to many of its paid subscribers for no additional charge. Starting today, Dropbox Professional accounts get 2TB of storage space, while Business Standard teams have access to 3TB of shared storage space. According to Dropbox, its new storage limits give customers more freedom to free up phone and hard drive space, share large files, and work with Dropbox's Smart Syncing features. All new Professional and Business Standard accounts include the upgraded storage today, while storage for existing accounts will be upgraded in the coming weeks. Dropbox is not increasing storage space available for free tiers or its Plus accounts. Free storage space remains limited to 2GB, while Plus subscribers will continue to have 1TB of storage space. Dropbox Professional is priced at $19.99 per month or $16.58 when paying yearly. Dropbox Business is priced at $15 per month per user with a minimum of three users, but pricing drops to $12.50 per user when billed

Dropbox Launches New 'Dropbox Professional' Account Option for Freelancers

Dropbox today introduced a new account option called Dropbox Professional, aimed at individuals who need more storage and features than are available with a standard Plus account, but don't need a business account. Priced at $19.99 per month, Dropbox Professional offers 1TB of storage and it includes a new feature called Dropbox Showcase. Dropbox Showcase allows for Dropbox content to be organized into a PDF with a customized layout, visual previews, captions, and personalized branding, turning it into a portfolio of sorts. Along with Dropbox Showcase and 1TB of storage, the new tier includes OCR and Smart Sync, a feature previously limited to Dropbox Business users. Smart Sync allows users to customize where files and folders are stored, with options for storing locally, in the cloud, or both. With OCR or optical character recognition, Dropbox can understand the text in scanned documents, allowing for them to be searchable. The final feature available in Dropbox Showcase is an option to cause a document to remotely expire. The introduction of Dropbox Professional comes two weeks after Dropbox introduced its revamped brand design that focuses on bright, contrasting colors, and introduces new fonts and logos to its products. Dropbox users can sign up for Dropbox Professional starting

Dropbox Introduces New Brand Design With Bright Colors, Revamped Logo and New Typeface

Dropbox today announced a major brand redesign that focuses on bright, contrasting colors, with a new logo design, new illustration style, and a revamped signature font. According to Dropbox, the new design "juxtaposes color pairs in bold, unexpected ways," which will be used for marketing and branding purposes. The new colors will be applied to the redesigned Dropbox logo, which features the same standard box, but with a flatter, simpler design. Dropbox says the color of the logo will "change based on the situation" and will no longer be limited to blue. A new illustration style will be used to "bring the creative process to live" with rough sketches of graphite paired with colorful, abstract shapes, and Dropbox is adopting a new typeface called Sharp Grotesk that offers 259 fonts. Our new design system is built on the idea that extraordinary things happen when diverse minds come together. We communicate this visually by pairing contrasting colors, type, and imagery to show what's possible when we bring ideas together in unexpected ways.Dropbox says the new brand design was inspired by the creative work of its customers and is meant to reflect the company's passion for building tools to help teams "unleash their creative energy." According to Dropbox, the new look will be seen everywhere from its website to its products over the course of the coming weeks, but it's not clear how much the brand redesign will impact Dropbox's web interface or apps. The company says the new design will be dialed down to allow people to concentrate on their work, with the

Dropbox Paper For iOS Gains Offline Mode and Multiple Language Support

Dropbox's collaborative editing software Paper received an update to its iOS app on Tuesday that allows users to edit their documents offline. Similar to Google Docs, Paper offers Dropbox account holders a minimalist document editor and conversational tools for collaborative projects. Users review and revise work in a single, shared space which includes an image gallery feature, advanced search across files and comments, and a notifications system that works across both the iOS app and the web version of the service. The new offline feature was introduced to allow users to create new documents, or access, edit, and comment on documents stored in the cloud even if they lost their internet connection. When the connection is restored, changes are automatically synced to the Paper service. The change brings Paper one step closer to Google Docs functionality, but currently the offline mode applies to mobile users only – Dropbox has yet to add the support to the web app version of the service. In addition to the offline mode, Dropbox announced Paper support for 20 additional languages, including Danish, Dutch, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Malay, Norwegian Bokmål, Malay, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, and Russian. Paper is a free download for iPhone and iPad available on the App Store. [Direct Link

Dropbox Launches Collaborative Office Suite 'Paper', Plus 'Smart Sync' for Business Users

Dropbox yesterday officially launched its collaborative editing software called Paper, following six months of public beta testing. Similar to Google Docs, the service offers Dropbox account holders a minimalist document editor and conversational tools for collaborative projects. Paper lets users review and revise work in a single, shared space which includes an image gallery feature, advanced search across files and comments, and a notifications system that works across both the iOS app and the web version of the service. Users can see and add Dropbox files in a Paper document, while any changes made are synced automatically and team members are notified of the new version and the author of the changes. Dropbox says the web version of Paper supports 21 languages, with similar support for the mobile apps in the pipeline. Mobile support for offline workspaces is also coming soon. In addition to the launch of Paper, the company announced a new Dropbox Business account feature called Smart Sync, which allows users with low disk space to see cloud-stored files and folders on their desktop. Users working with just 128 GB of hard drive space can easily comb through terabytes of files to find exactly what they need— right from Windows File Explorer or macOS Finder. Now, they won't need to take extra steps—like switching to a web browser— just to view files. And whenever they need to access files stored in the cloud, users can download them with a quick double click.Finally, Dropbox has announced new price plans for business customers. Its Standard plan costs

Dropbox for iOS Gains PDF Signing Tool, Messages Integration and Picture-in-Picture Support

Dropbox for iOS is being updated today with iOS 10 support and new features to improve the file storage and sharing experience. With Messages integration, Dropbox users can select Dropbox files from within the Messages app and share them with friends and colleagues, alleviating the need to open the Dropbox app and copy a link. A new Dropbox widget can be added to the lock screen, providing easier access to tools for creating, viewing, and uploading files. There's a new tool in the Dropbox for signing PDFs, and there are options for getting notified when a file has been updated by a colleague so it can be refreshed with a tap. Dropbox now includes support for picture-in-picture, a feature designed to let iPad users watch videos while performing other tasks. Split-screen support for compatible iPads is also coming in the near future, but won't be included in today's update. Dropbox can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

macOS Sierra Addresses Dropbox Security Concerns by Explicitly Asking for Accessibility User Permission

Following Dropbox-related security concerns that surfaced earlier this month, developer Phil Stokes has confirmed that macOS Sierra now explicitly requires apps to ask for user permission to access Accessibility (via Daring Fireball). Users can give access to an app, or click "not now" to deny the request. Concerns were raised after it was demonstrated that Dropbox appears in System Preferences > Security & Privacy under Accessibility, despite the fact that users were never prompted to grant access to the features. More details can be found in our previous coverage and in a Dropbox support document.Let’s assume for the sake of argument that Dropbox never does any evil on your computer. It remains the fact that the Dropbox process has that ability. And that means, if Dropbox itself has a bug in it, it’s possible an attacker could take control of your computer by hijacking flaws in Dropbox’s code. Of course, that’s entirely theoretical, but all security risks are until someone exploits them. The essence of good computer security and indeed the very reason why OSX has these kinds of safeguards in place to begin with is that apps should not have permissions greater than those that they need to do their job.At the time, Dropbox said it was working with Apple to reduce its dependence on elevated access in macOS Sierra, and would respect when people disable the app's Accessibility permissions, but now a much-needed safeguard exists regardless. In a new blog post, Dropbox still recommends that Mac users running macOS Sierra update their Accessibility permissions, if

Dropbox Responds to Mac 'Security Risk' Accusations [Updated]

Dropbox has said it needs to do a "better job" of communicating its OS X integration, after claims emerged online that its Mac app was phishing for user passwords and even "hacks" the operating system on installation. Developers of the cloud storage service were forced to reply to accusations which appeared on Hacker News that the client app was a security risk and "couldn't be trusted", because of the way it takes control of system features without asking for permission to do so. Dropbox gains access to Accessibility features without requesting access. Concerns were raised after it was demonstrated that Dropbox appears in the Security & Privacy tab for Accessibility, despite the fact that users are never prompted to grant access to the features. Let’s assume for the sake of argument that Dropbox never does any evil on your computer. It remains the fact that the Dropbox process has that ability. And that means, if Dropbox itself has a bug in it, it’s possible an attacker could take control of your computer by hijacking flaws in Dropbox’s code. Of course, that’s entirely theoretical, but all security risks are until someone exploits them. The essence of good computer security and indeed the very reason why OSX has these kinds of safeguards in place to begin with is that apps should not have permissions greater than those that they need to do their job. Responding to the accusations, Dropbox said it only asks for the permissions it needs and uses the Accessibility features for certain app integrations like Office, although the permissions aren't as "granular" as

Dropbox Hack in 2012 Targeted Over 60 Million Accounts

After Dropbox forced a password reset on any user who hadn't changed their login credentials since mid-2012 -- due to a hack faced by the company that year -- new information has surfaced recently detailing the extent of the user data leak. According to a collection of files obtained by Motherboard, containing the email addresses and hashed passwords of the affected user base, a total of 68,680,741 Dropbox accounts were successfully targeted during the 2012 hack. When Dropbox announced it was going through with the preventative password reset measure last week, the company didn't give any hint as to the extent of the users touched by the four-year-old hack. The "incident," as Dropbox refers to it, was a data breach in the summer of 2012 where a few users began reporting spam sent to email addresses connected to a Dropbox account. Due to a password hack connected to other websites, hackers were able to sign in to "a small number" of Dropbox accounts, including an employee's who had access to a document listing an array of user email addresses. Dropbox is confident its message to users last week has covered "all potentially impacted users," and the company is encouraging users to still reset passwords on other services that have the same login information, particularly passwords, previously used for Dropbox. “We've confirmed that the proactive password reset we completed last week covered all potentially impacted users," said Patrick Heim, Head of Trust and Security for Dropbox. "We initiated this reset as a precautionary measure, so that the old passwords

Dropbox Requiring Users to Change Old Passwords Dating Back to Mid-2012

Dropbox yesterday emailed users who have not changed their passwords since mid-2012 to inform them they will be prompted to do so the next time they log in. The cloud storage firm called the action a "preventative measure" and said that there was no indication user accounts had been improperly accessed. Users who held passwords created after mid-2012 were not affected, said the company. In a blog post explaining what prompted the step, Dropbox said it had learned about an old set of user credentials (email addresses plus hashed and salted passwords) that were stolen in an incident the company reported in 2012. Based on our threat monitoring and the way we secure passwords, we don't believe that any accounts have been improperly accessed. Still, as one of many precautions, we're requiring anyone who hasn't changed their password since mid-2012 to update it the next time they sign in.The incident is likely related to the huge LinkedIn hack which saw 117 million account credentials posted online. It's thought that hackers tried the login details on other websites under the assumption that some people use the same passwords across different online services. Dropbox has taken the opportunity to urge its users to consider enabling two-factor authentication when signing in, and has warned about the risk of re-using the same password across multiple

Dropbox's Document Editing Tool 'Paper' Launches iOS App and Begins Open Beta

Dropbox today announced the expansion of its collaborative document editing service "Paper" onto mobile devices running iOS and Android. Paper originally required an invitation to join its beta, but the company is now also opening up access to anyone who's interested in trying out the service, either on desktop or mobile. Paper lets work teams tackle projects at the same time, within a singular document, and even embed videos, images, and more to create successful projects. With feedback from its first beta users, Dropbox has introduced a few new feature updates to Paper as well: image galleries are easier to create and edit with drag-and-drop functionality, both web and mobile apps now have notifications, and Paper's search has been boosted "to help you quickly find the docs you need." "From a strategy perspective, Paper's right at the center [of Dropbox]," Dropbox project manager Kavitha Radhakrishnan said. "We're looking at Paper as being a core part of the Dropbox experience, and our momentum over the last year should be a pretty strong signal about how seriously we're taking this." In an in-depth dive taken by Engadget, Paper's new iOS app positioned itself as a mobile companion to its desktop counterpart. With the app, users will be able to read notifications, check out which team member is editing and participating in what document, and respond to direct messages sent their way, but any robust editing or creation tools are left out of the mobile app. Still, "basic document editing features" will allow for quick text and image edits, and the app even

Dropbox for iOS Gains Document Scanner, Other Productivity Improvements

Dropbox today announced a range of new productivity improvements designed to "simplify, unify, and secure" Dropbox workflows. New to Dropbox's mobile apps, including Dropbox for iOS, is a built-in document scanner that uses an iPhone or iPad's camera to capture photos of whiteboards, notes, receipts, sketches, and more, converting them into documents that can be stored in Dropbox. Like many iOS-based scanning apps, Dropbox's scanning tool will automatically detect the outline of the item being scanned and it offers editing tools for straightening, adjusting contrast, adding additional pages, and converting to black and white. Dropbox for Business users have additional scanning features at their disposal, including optical character recognition to convert scans into searchable text. Improved Microsoft Office integration allows iOS users to create a Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, or Excel file by clicking a new plus button, simplifying the process of working on documents while on the go. Camera uploads are also being tweaked and going forward, Dropbox Basic users who want to continue to use the feature will need to install the Dropbox desktop app for management purposes. On the desktop, there are new options to right click on a file or folder in the Mac Finder to share files from the desktop, and there are options for adding comments to a specific part of a file. Version history keeps multiple versions of a file in case a mistake is made, and there are better options for sharing with a select group of people. Dropbox for the desktop is available from the Dropbox

Dropbox's 'Project Infinite' Introduces Cloud Storage to Free Up Hard Drive Space

At Dropbox Open London today, the company announced "Project Infinite," a new feature of the popular document transferring app that will save space on a user's local hard drive thanks to the implementation of a new cloud storage feature. With Infinite, both cloud files and locally saved files will cohabitate in the traditional location within Finder on Macs, letting users decide which take up storage space and which stay in the cloud. Documents saved in the cloud will be marked with a tiny icon referencing their storage location, but there won't be any kind of laborious download process if a user needs to quickly gain access to anything not directly saved on their computer. Cloud files will sync on demand when a user clicks on them, displaying them in the same way as locally stored files. If a file will be needed in a location lacking an Internet connection, users can choose to "Save local copy" and download the cloud file for later. In Project Infinite's introduction video, the company gives the example of a shared company Dropbox folder with upwards of 10 terabytes of data synced inside. On the desktop of one user, however, the folder is taking up just 28 megabytes of data thanks to the inclusion of cloud storage. The company also mentioned that Project Infinite supports all platforms that Dropbox is available on, and even includes backwards-compatibility "on any computer running Windows 7 or higher, or Mac OS X 10.9 and up." So a file saved by a team member on Windows 8, for instance, can be viewed as a placeholder cloud file on another user's iMac, and

Dropbox Shutting Down Mailbox and Carousel in Early 2016

Dropbox has announced that it will be shutting down popular email and photo sharing apps Mailbox and Carousel on February 26, 2016 and March 31, 2016 respectively. Dropbox originally acquired Mailbox in March 2013, and launched Carousel in April 2014. The company says it will be communicating directly with users of both apps in the coming days. Mailbox users will no longer be able to sign in starting February 26, and Dropbox will disable and delete "Auto-swipe" patterns, return "Snoozed" emails to inboxes and delete all email drafts on that day. Mailbox has posted a FAQ to assist users with the transition. Carousel timeline photos will remain available in Dropbox, and an export tool will be released early next year to save conversations or shared albums. In the meantime, photos within shared albums can be saved to Dropbox directly from the Carousel app. Carousel has posted a FAQ to help users with the transition. Dropbox:The Carousel and Mailbox teams have built products that are loved by many people and their work will continue to have an impact. We’ll be taking key features from Carousel back to the place where your photos live—in the Dropbox app. We’ll also be using what we’ve learned from Mailbox to build new ways to communicate and collaborate on Dropbox (you can see early signs of this focus with Paper).Mailbox:…As we deepened our focus on collaboration, we realized there’s only so much an email app can do to fundamentally fix email. We’ve come to believe that the best way for us to improve people’s productivity going forward is to streamline the

Dropbox Updates iOS App With File Comments, Document Creation, and More

Connected file management service Dropbox today announced an update to its iPhone and iPad apps that will debut a trio of new features to iOS devices, bringing easier navigation, introducing communication features, and allowing the creation of Microsoft Word documents from within the app itself. Right from the home screen the Dropbox team has decided to make big changes, doing away with a static list of files and instead curating a showcase of documents and files with which a user has most recently interacted. This way, the company suggests, "The files you’re most likely to need on the go will always be front and center." The recently introduced comment feature for the Dropbox website will now also be available on iOS devices. Using an "@" symbol followed by a Dropbox user's name or email address, anyone can be brought into discussion over a particular document, with the app sending push notifications to the lock screen to ensure everyone is kept in the loop on any particular conversation. The company also confirmed that "in the next few weeks" it would be introducing the ability to create and interact with Microsoft Office documents from within the iOS Dropbox apps. Any Word, Excel, or Powerpoint file created inside of the app will be subsequently saved to whatever Dropbox folder a user was in when creating the document, allowing instantaneous access to the file from everywhere a user can sign in to Dropbox. As the company points out, however, the new update's most interesting feature is not any one of its individual new aspects but how they have the

Dropbox Acquires Document Editing Service CloudOn

CloudOn has announced it has been acquired by popular document storage and syncing service Dropbox, with the two companies joining forces to advance document editing, storage, and more through the cloud. As part of the deal, CloudOn's existing services will shut down on March 15. Today, we’re taking the next step toward our vision of reimagining docs – by joining the Dropbox team. Our companies share similar values, are committed to helping people work better, and together we can make an even greater impact.As pointed out by The Wall Street Journal, Dropbox has been purchasing dozens of small startups to bolster its overseas presence, and CloudOn gives Dropbox a presence in Israel. According to Dropbox's head of product, business and mobile, Ilya Fushman, the CloudOn partnership is the largest number of employees added into the company through an acquisition. CloudOn rose to prominence three years ago when it launched an iPad app that used the mobile device as an interface for a full cloud-based app located on their servers, allowing users to run an instance of Microsoft Office on their iPads. CloudOn's services have evolved over time, but the company has continued to focus on Office document editing and creation, making a partnership with Dropbox a natural