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South Korean Court Dismisses Samsung's Patent Lawsuit Against Apple

A judge representing the Seoul Central District Court in South Korea has dismissed a Samsung lawsuit stating that Apple had infringed on three of the company's patents, removing the opportunity for Samsung to receive monetary benefits and impose a sales ban on the iPhone 4S and iPad 2, reports Reuters. The verdict comes after a August 2012 ruling by a South Korean court declaring that Samsung and Apple had violated each others patents, ultimately resulting in the sales ban of some older products from both companies in South Korea.

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A judge at the Seoul Central District Court said Apple products such as the iPhone 4S, iPhone 5 and iPad2 did not violate Samsung patents on short message display methods and messaging grouping features.

The court ruled against a sale ban on the products and threw out Samsung's claim for 100 million won ($95,100) in damages.

"We are glad the Korean court joined others around the world in standing up for real innovation and rejecting Samsung's ridiculous claims," Apple Korea spokesman Steve Park said.
In the same ruling, the court also fined Samsung 25 million won (approximately $23,800) for violating the "rubber banding" patent that enables a visual effect when scrolling through a page on a touch-screen device.

Last year, Samsung was ordered to pay Apple a total of $1.05 billion after a U.S. jury found the South Korean company guilty of willfully violating multiple Apple patents. Back in March, Judge Lucy Koh struck $450 million from the $1 billion awarded to Samsung after deciding the jury may have miscalculated the damages due to a misunderstanding of patent issues.

A retrial held last month found Samsung liable for $290 million in damages. The company replying to the verdict by filing a motion to halt payment, requesting a reevaluation of the validity of No. 7,844,915 covering Apple's “pinch-to-zoom“ gestures. The motion to stay the damages however was denied, with a reevaluation of the pinch-to-zoom patent still set to take place.

Top Rated Comments

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10 months ago
If this doesn't prove that Apple are the good guys and Samsung are the copying b*stards, then I'm not sure what will?
Rating: 23 Votes
10 months ago
Hard to argue against a judgement by a court in your own country.
Rating: 22 Votes
10 months ago
Ouch! Being dismissed in your own country... that's going to burn.

What will the Android users be saying against Apple's win in California now?
Rating: 12 Votes
10 months ago
For Apple lately...
Rating: 7 Votes
10 months ago

Hard to argue against a judgement by a court in your own country.


Exactly. I've also heard that Samsung make up a crazy percentage of Korea's GDP - around 20% (don't have a citation so I'm not sure if I'm remembering correctly).

If that's the case then it really goes to show how important this ruling was.
Rating: 3 Votes
10 months ago

If this doesn't prove that Apple are the good guys and Samsung are the copying b*stards, then I'm not sure what will?


Certainly this case does not do that, since it was only about whether or not Apple infringed on some Samsung texting patents.

It also bears repeating once again, that it doesn't matter who the defendant is (here it's Apple, but it could be anybody), software patent infringement is virtually never about copying. It's about developers independently coming up with the same implementation.

It's a prime reason why many countries don't allow software patents at all. Software patents benefit large corporations the most, as they have the time and money to put into making lots of patent applications (and re-applications).
Rating: 3 Votes
10 months ago

Can you explain why Schmidt was needed to do that?

is people really believing this nonsense?

If Jobs or Apple believed that Schmidt did anything like that, they would have sued him for industrial theft. They never ever said anything about Schmidt.

please, stop with that crap, Schmidt didn't stole anything, because there was no need to steal anything. and if you think apple/Google board members can steal source code, you're very naive




Steve Jobs only said anything about Android in 2010, almost two years after the release and almost a year after Schmidt left Apple boards.

And he was angry about the multi touch thing, thing that was not really patented by them


there's a reason why schmidt later was excused when the board discussed iphone. and a reason he was dismissed altogether.
Rating: 3 Votes
10 months ago
I remember when this all started all the posts about "Koreans are all X" and "everyone in Korea does Y."

I hope this helps people get past the ethnocentrism and stereotyping of people, because this story is an instance showing that there are judges in Korea that follow the law just like there are everywhere else. Painting a country with a broad brush is very naive.

Like there aren't any corrupt judges in the US.
Rating: 3 Votes
10 months ago

An the role is ...


I think it was what Steve Jobs said about Google when he was angry. "ssspinball" nailed it.
Rating: 2 Votes
10 months ago

there's a reason why schmidt later was excused when the board discussed iphone. and a reason he left.


I think some people like the idea of the conspiracy, that Schmidt used his position to steal the iPhone, more than the rather bland reality.
Rating: 2 Votes

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