Jawbone Designer Debuts New August Smart Lock

Wednesday May 29, 2013 5:41 PM PDT by Juli Clover
The August Smart Lock is a new iPhone-compatible locking system that has been designed by Jason Johnson and Yves Béhar, who serves as Jawbone's Chief Creative Officer. Béhar, who has worked on products like the Jambox and the UP, has created a simple universal lock that is designed to connect to a smartphone using Bluetooth.

The lock itself is crafted of anodized aluminum and looks similar to a standard home lock. It comes with a number of faceplates and deadbolt adapters to fit the majority of the locks on the market, and it functions on four AA batteries. When battery life is low, the system will send out a notification.

augustsmartlock
Much like competing products Lockitron and Kevo, the August Smart Lock will be available without subscription fees. It will also function with an accompanying app, which can be programmed to allow entry to friends and family. The system monitors guests that enter and it can be customized with specific timers. TechCrunch has some additional information:
In addition to the ability to turn on and off access to the home through an app, users will be able to send invitations to friends or family that have been connected on Facebook or in their mobile contact list. Johnson gave the example of a dinner party, where visitors could be invited and let themselves in without having to ring the doorbell.

The August smart lock is powered by Bluetooth low energy (BLE) technology, which will enable it to work without connecting to a WiFi network. The team claims that it's the smallest electronic door lock on the market, and they say that it only takes 10 minutes to install.
There are no specific details on when the August Smart Lock will launch, but the reservation website says that it will go on sale later in the year with an expected ship date of November or December. The lock will cost $199, with no additional fees.

Top Rated Comments

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Posted: 19 months ago
If your phone runs out of battery, you're locked out.
Just use the old fashioned key.
Rating: 9 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago

If your phone runs out of battery, you're locked out.
Just use the old fashioned key.


Im going to guess that similar to lockitron, your standard key still works to open the door. The device goes on the inside of the door.

Watching the video would help.
Rating: 5 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago
Yay my iPhone was stolen and the crooks now are able to unlock my HOUSE so they can finish the job!
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago

If your phone runs out of battery, you're locked out.
Just use the old fashioned key.


No more locked out than if the battery on your car's FOB dies if you have the keyless entry option on your car... in other words not. You always have the traditional key backup.

I've had keyless entry since my '07 car. When I first heard about the option I thought how lazy can one be that they can't push a button on a remote. But they were clever and required the option in order to remotely open the trunk w/ top down (convertible) so I got it. I ended up not bothering with the trunk w/ top down but fell in love with just being able to touch the door handle and not having to fumble in my pocket for my key. Ever since I wished something similar was available for homes.

This new slew of locks and lock assists is an interesting start. I have a Lockitron on order but suspect its going to be a dud since it overlays w/ the existing lock. For older homes that have settled and requires a little finesse opening the lock I suspect the Lockitron will fail. The Kevo looks like a potential winner but I'm not changing all my locks to Kwikset -- I want one key that opens all doors. If I already had Kwikset I'd go for it in a second.

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Yay my iPhone was stolen and the crooks now are able to unlock my HOUSE so they can finish the job!


1) They'd have to know where you live -- do you really have your address on your phone?

2) If you realize your phone is missing you go online and disable the lock just like you disable your iPhone.

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How secure is this thing? Couldn't someone make an app to trick it into opening?


Depends on how secure the code is. But if its like the rolling code on a garage door opener or a keyless entry car it would take a while to crack. Keyless entry isn't new, just new to residential locksets.
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago
Just slip a spare charger in your porch somewhere
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago
Most people I know have two locks on their door, the deadbolt, and one in the knob. I can already see the looks on people's faces when they realize that while installing it :apple::):confused::eek::mad::(
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago
As long as there are less secure entrypoints, a locked door is simply a social contract to keep honest people out (and how many honest people go around jiggling doorknobs anyway?).

The crooks are going to come in through a window, or better yet, the sliding glass door in the back where the neighbors won't see them taking your TV out.

If you're the sort of person who has bars on their windows, then maybe a fancy electronic deadbolt-rotator is right for you, just make sure you don't stick it on a lock that's easily pickable or a decent thief will still get in. Hint: if you bought your doorknob and deadbolt set at a hardware store, it's probably easily pickable. Most of the common brands are mass produced cheaply and have many vulnerabilities as a result. Oh yeah, and you'd better have a pretty strong metal door too, that can't be easily smashed open. Your doorframe needs to be as strong as your door.

While the geek in me thinks these sorts of things are cool, the geekier geek in me who has studied locks and security knows that it's a complete waste of money. If you want something equally cool, and far more useful for security, get some home automation modules and set up motion sensors in your house, then make that information available to software on your phone. You can just be notified when somebody's breaking in, and have peace of mind when they're not.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago

I'm enjoying the knee-jerk reactions from people who clearly didn't watch the video.

If you run out of battery, use your key.

You don't have to pull your iPhone out to unlock the door.

$199 is not expensive for the amount of convenience this provides.

You COULD unlock your door the old fashioned way, much like you could do the same for your car. Except we have all accepted keyless entry and remote start systems in cars, why not allow them for the house?


You could disable access for your phone using your computer, as shown in the video. Also you could wipe it with iCloud.


No kidding, lot of people here thinking really hard why this is a bad idea. I'll never have to give someone a spare key again.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago

Too Much Technology.

This is one of those cases of applying too much complexity.


How is it too complex? The homeowner or authorized guest touches the handle and the door opens. It's very simple. This type of technology has been available in cars for about 5 years. Frankly I wondered why it took so long to get to residential homes.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 19 months ago
I'm enjoying the knee-jerk reactions from people who clearly didn't watch the video.

If you run out of battery, use your key.

You don't have to pull your iPhone out to unlock the door.

$199 is not expensive for the amount of convenience this provides.

You COULD unlock your door the old fashioned way, much like you could do the same for your car. Except we have all accepted keyless entry and remote start systems in cars, why not allow them for the house?




you lose your iphone, the guy now has all your contact details, personal info and an electronic access to your house

You could disable access for your phone using your computer, as shown in the video. Also you could wipe it with iCloud.
Rating: 2 Votes

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