Former Apple Employee Rediscovers Photos from Steve Jobs' First Day Back at Apple

Wednesday March 27, 2013 5:09 PM PDT by Jordan Golson
Former Apple employee Tim Holmes recently discovered a set of photographs taken on an Apple QuickTake camera -- one of the first digital cameras made -- from the night Steve Jobs returned to Apple after it purchased NeXT.

Holmes notes in the description that the colors are incorrect in the photos because of the poor quality of digital cameras in 1996, and that Jobs' jacket was actually black, not purple.

Jobsandchahil
Working late on a Friday on December 20th at Apple Computer as Mac OS Evangelist, my manager came rushing past my office door saying to come with him to Town Hall, Apple's theater for announcements, company meetings and the like. It was clearly not a company meeting…
Joining Jobs' in the image above was Satjiv Chahil, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing at the time.

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21 months ago

Might as well be black & white....


Or make the jackets black.

Rating: 16 Votes
21 months ago
From Tim Holmes' Flickr page:

"I tend to take a camera everywhere, so I had my Apple QuickTake camera, which Steve Jobs killed within the year. The colors are way off due to the poor quality of digital cameras in 1996, Steve's jacket was black in real life."


Makes you wonder why Steve Jobs would kill off a digital camera that rendered black as a vivid shade of purple. ;)
Rating: 10 Votes
21 months ago
Might as well be black & white....

Rating: 9 Votes
21 months ago
It was taken with an iPhone which gave it the infamous "purple hue"!!
Rating: 5 Votes
21 months ago

It was taken with an iPhone which gave it the infamous "purple hue"!!


iPhone didn't exist back then. Screw Samsung.
Rating: 5 Votes
21 months ago

...why?


Because the colour is all wrong in the original. The B&W is far less garish and your head can fill in the right colours.
Rating: 4 Votes
21 months ago

Sell it on ebay or something... some fanboy collector (I don't mean that in a bad way) would buy it I'm sure.


Fanboy collector? You mean there are people out there who collect fanboys? Is that legal? :D
Rating: 4 Votes
21 months ago

Joining Jobs' in the image above was Satjiv Chahil, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing at the time.


I can imagine that the meeting went something like this:

Chahil: "Hey Steve! Welcome back!"
Jobs: "And you are?"
Chahil: "Satjiv, President of Worldwide Marketing."
Jobs: "Can you think different?"
Chahil: "Think? Different? Why would I want to do that?"
Jobs: "You're fired, bozo."
Rating: 4 Votes
21 months ago

How exactly did you get the "Screw Samsung" from the article?

They never had the Purple Haze syndrome...

He must have taken the picture wrong.


Sorry, I thought both things I stated would be obviously humorous ;)

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Or make the jackets black.

Image (http://forums.macrumors.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=404917&d=1364431203)


I personally like the purple version more :D
Rating: 3 Votes
21 months ago

From Tim Holmes' Flickr page:



Makes you wonder why Steve Jobs would kill off a digital camera that rendered black as a vivid shade of purple. ;)


Wow, yeah.

Although mine still works, and it has never done that. Maybe an early firmware version?

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The wall in the background looks like a fairly dark color, but we know it couldn't have actually been black because then it would look bright purple. What color should that wall be?

Edit: What color is Gil wearing on the right? His jacket came out black...


If you look at "black" clothing under *VERY* bright light, it will often have a tint to it - blue and brown are the most common.

Likewise, they have tint in infrared. That tint is generally much greater than the visible-spectrum tint.

Early digital cameras generally did not have good IR filters. With no IR filter, you see into the infrared, so the IR tint shows up *WAY* more prominently than you would possibly see in real life. In real life, these probably had a very slight brown tint. The sensor doesn't quite know what to make of the extra (infrared) light coming in, so it overloads one or more of the subpixels. In this case, the blue and red ones - causing a purple tint.

Amateur astrophotographers (people who take pictures of stars,) sometimes remove the iR filter from their new/fancy digital camera because it increases the sensitivity - and stars emit IR quite well, too. I've never tried it (my IR-filter-removed camera died last year,) but I would wager that a camera so-modified would take similar pictures.
Rating: 3 Votes

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