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Judge Koh Rules That Samsung Did Not Willfully Infringe Apple Patents

Judge Lucy Koh ruled in a court filing (via The Verge) tonight that Samsung did not willfully infringe Apple patents. This decision denies any additional damages to the $1.05 billion awarded to Apple last August.
As this is the sum total of Apple's arguments and evidence that Samsung's infringement was willful, the Court cannot conclude that Apple has met its burden to show willfulness by clear and convincing evidence.
Samsung argued that they had reason to believe that Apple's patents were invalid and therefore did not willfully infringe Apple patents. Judge Koh ultimately concluded that there had been no willful infringement but did not overturn the validity of Apple's patents.

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Judge Koh also denied Samsung's bid for a new trial, saying that "the trial was fairly conducted, with uniform time limits and rules of evidence applied on both sides." She went on to write that "a new trial would be contrary to the interests of justice."

If Samsung had been found to be willfully infringing Apple patents their penalty might have ballooned well over $1.05 billion that they must pay Apple. In December, Judge Koh had denied another Samsung retrial request based on juror misconduct. The decision is yet another milestone in the long saga that is Samsung v. Apple.

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Posted: 20 months ago
Cough up that billion...
Rating: 10 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
Destroy, smarmy Shamsung.
Rating: 10 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
How does she uphold the validity of the patents, but sided with Samsung's argument that they didn't willfully violate the patents due to Samsung questioning the validity of them? They willfully violated them if they are indeed valid....

Oh well..... Legal BS( not because Apple lost, but because I don't understand it).
Rating: 8 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
This news has become such *yawn* that hardly anyone comments on it anymore.

...


... yeah.


But as the other poster says -- Samsung IS built on ripping off other products. They don't play 'fair'. They take calculated risks and pour their resources into it. They got lucky with the battery industry -- one of the first markets that they flooded their 'crap' into. The quality of their products however, is something to consider. They don't make absolute crap stuff (like a lot of Chinese companies do when they flood markets) but then again they don't make the absolute best stuff either, unless you're talking about the components industry (where they seem to produce some of the best components because of the research and development they put into it).

They gamble. A lot. For the past few years, they've been lucky at it too -- after batteries came lighting. From their lighting industry they started building TVs. They have enough money to play dirty and take huge risks where other companies can't afford to.

In the cellphone industry they designed their phones after EVERY popular phone that was trending at the time. They copied the RazR, the BB and of course, the iPhone because a lot of people don't know better.

Are they evil? Depends on how you perceive 'fair' in the giant corporate space. Because they actually put a enough (just enough) quality in their products, consumers can't say they're evil.

To corporations however, they're a NECESSARY evil because of their research and technology. Just ask Apple and everyone else who relies on them.
Rating: 8 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago


This discussion makes no sense, and you know that. We do not change the verdict, which in this case, is a good thing.


No I do not know that because I don't understand it. I am not saying change the ruling. I do not care that Samsung won or complaining that Apple lost because Apple is the best and Samsung is evil.....

It's the fact Samsung's defense was they infringed on the patents because they believed they were invalid. Is that really a good excuse to use to show that you didn't willfully infringed on a persons patent? Hence why I am asking for an explanation which you aren't doing.
Rating: 6 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

Because the 1st has nothing to do with the 2nd. The validity of patents and a violation are not the same thing. I thought that this was obvious. Not?


They did willfully violate the patents on the basis of they thought they were invalid. But since they are valid, they should pay, no? Saying they didn't willfully violate them means that they created something that was infringing on Apple's patents inadvertently. Which wasn't the case here. Samsung full knowingly infringed on Apple's patents. They willfully did it on the basis of thinking they were invalid according to Samsung's own defense.
Rating: 6 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

Then you know more than the Judge. iLOL


It's not what I am getting in this situation which no one is explaining. Samsung's defense was that they didn't believe Apple's patents are valid so they ignored them and infringed them( which I think is a BS excuse to infringe on patents. It's like I don't believe a law is valid so I am going to ignore it). That shows that they willfully infringed on those patents since they were valid upon infringement and then backed up by her ruling.....

If Samsung believed Apple's patents were invalid, then they should have challenged them without infringing them( maybe Samsung was the anonymous challenge with the patent office....)
Rating: 6 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

No I do not know that because I don't understand it. I am not saying change the ruling. I do not care that Samsung won or complaining that Apple lost because Apple is the best and Samsung is evil.....

It's the fact Samsung's defense was they infringed on the patents because they believed they were invalid. Is that really a good excuse to use to show that you didn't willfully infringed on a persons patent? Hence why I am asking for an explanation which you aren't doing.


Apple still won. Samsung still must pay the $1.05 Billion...this ruling saying that they don't have to pay more than the $1.05 Billion.

Samsung's believing that Apple's patent claims don't cover or prevent Samsung from building their product...is not the same as believing Apple's patents are invalid.

This is the norm. A company(Samsung) reads another's patents, decides that their product is different and does not fall under any patent. Then Samsung builds and sells the product. Apple disagrees and sues. When Samsung realizes that they may lose, then they will try to challenge the validity of the Apple patents. So it was not done 'willfully' means that Samsung first thought was that the patents did not cover their product...they may have thought them invalid, in general, too, but that was not a necessary argument. And now, the judge says it was not willful, and seems to support that the Apple patents are valid in regards to Samsung's products.

So Samsung lost twice. They only 'won' in limiting their liability to $1.05 Billion, and the public disgrace that they infringed on Apples patents, not willfully. So they need better lawyers, or a CEO that listens to their lawyers. ;)

However, I do believe that Samsung has built their company by taking this risk often, while other companies will be less risk adverse.
Rating: 5 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago
I'm confused how apple still has bad rep when Samsung are the ones illegally copying here. I suppose when it comes to a product a consumer will pick a cheaper one over any moral obligation to buy the originators version. Shame society still hasn't progressed from cave man ethics.
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 20 months ago

How does she uphold the validity of the patents, but sided with Samsung's argument that they didn't willfully violate the patents due to Samsung questioning the validity of them? They willfully violated them if they are indeed valid....

Oh well..... Legal BS( not because Apple lost, but because I don't understand it).


I'm a patent attorney so I can shed some light on this. The consequences of being held to be a "willful infringer" are severe. The judge can triple the damages awarded. Under current law, one of the ways of avoiding this is to request a legal opinion from independent counsel as to whether or not you infringe the patents and whether or not the patents are valid. When Samsung was accused of infringing these patents, I'm sure they hired outside counsel to evaluate the validity of the patents, as well as to evaluate whether they infringed. Outside counsel prepares a formal written opinion as to these issues. If this written opinion states that it is likely that the patents are invalid or that Samsung does not infringe, then Samsung may be allowed to rely on that opinion to the point that they are no longer considered a "willful infringer". There are no hard fast right or wrong answers when it comes to these legal issues....they are subject to the juries' and judge's interpretation of the facts and application of the law. The judge takes a look at the legal opinion that Samsung relied on, and if the conclusions in the opinion are based on a reasonable interpretation of the law and a reasonable application of the facts, then it will be sufficient to absolve Samsung from a willful infringement charge. Typically, the attorney that prepared the opinion is put on the stand and questioned by both sides. Samsung's attorneys try to show that his opinion was well reasoned and based on a proper application of the law and Apple's attorneys try to show that the analysis in the opinion was flawed. That's how the game is played. What trips people up is that they think that there is an absolute answer to these questions. That the patents are either valid or they're not, and if the judge finds that they're valid then how can Samsung claim to not be a willful infringer because they thought the patents were invalid. Well, the application of most laws involve a subjective component. That's why we have trials....because the facts are subject to more than one interpretation. Just because Samsung lost at trial does not mean that they could not have reasonably relied on opinion from outside counsel that the patents were invalid. The fact that the patents were ultimately held valid does not absolve them from liability, but it does absolve them from the punitive damages associated with being a willful infringer.
Rating: 3 Votes

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