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Twitter Introducing 'Topics' Feature That Lets Users Follow Subjects of Interest

Twitter is set to roll out a new feature called "Topics" that allows users to follow conversations about subjects of interest, similar to how they'd follow an account. According to an official Twitter blog post, Topic suggestions will soon start appearing in user timelines and in search, based on what they tend to look for and already follow on the social media platform. When a user follows a topic, like a music band, sports team, or celebrity, they'll see tweets from a broad range of accounts that share the same interest. Previously, all of the work was on you to figure out the best way to keep up with what's happening by following certain accounts, searching for it, or looking in the Explore tab for the latest. Now, you have the option of seeing the most relevant and interesting Tweets about what you care about with a single tap, and the conversation will come to you.A Topics option already appears in the mobile app's sidebar menu, but currently just shows an introductory screen for the feature. When the feature rolls out in full, it will list the topics you've followed. Hot takes? Always. Hot topics? Brand new.Now you can follow specific topics to discover the Tweets you care about. pic.twitter.com/3tVBRFuTYd— Twitter (@Twitter) November 11, 2019 Future features will include the ability to preview the feed content of a topic before choosing to follow it, the ability to add topics to lists, and the ability to mute topics. Twitter says that Topic suggestions will start showing up in timelines and in searches from November 13, with a worldwide

Instagram to Start Hiding 'Likes' in the US This Week

Instagram is to begin testing hiding content "likes" in the United States this week. The change will first be rolled out to a limited number of accounts in the U.S., and users of those accounts will still be able to see how many likes they got on their own posts. The plan was announced at WIRED25 by head of Instagram, Adam Mosseri, who also took to Twitter to share the news. "It's about young people," Mosseri said during the Wired panel. "The idea is to try to 'depressurize' Instagram, make it less of a competition and give people more space to focus on connecting with people that they love, things that inspire them." "It means we're going to put a 15-year-old kid's interests before a public speaker's interest," he added. "When we look at the world of public content, we're going to put people in that world before organizations and corporations."Hiding likes would fundamentally change the way Instagram works, as liking photos and garnering likes is one of the platform's main features. Heads up! We've been testing making likes private on Instagram in a number of countries this year. We're expanding those tests to include a small portion of people in the US next week. Looking forward to the feedback!— Adam Mosseri (@mosseri) November 9, 2019 The Facebook-owned, photo-based platform has conducted similar trials in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Ireland, Italy, Japan, and New Zealand. The removal of Instagram likes follows other recent user-focused changes, like the addition of a timer that shows users how long they've spent in the app, and the removal of the Instagram

Twitter Issues iOS App Update to Fix Buggy Auto-Refresh Timeline Behavior

Twitter has pushed out a point release for its official iPhone and iPad app after numerous reports of buggy auto-refresh behavior began appearing on social media. A number of users who updated to version 8.1 of the app, released last week, said that their Twitter timeline was refreshing randomly and making them lose track of what they were reading. It's unclear what's been causing the jumpy auto-scrolling behavior – presumably whatever changes were made to the auto-refresh function were supposed to happen invisibly and update the top of the timeline so that scrolling up to see new tweets would be seamless. We know your timeline auto-scrolling on iOS is frustrating and we’re sorry for the inconvenience. We’re working on fixing this now. Thanks for sticking with us.— Twitter Support (@TwitterSupport) November 4, 2019 Regardless, Twitter acknowledged the "frustrating" issue on Monday and asked users for patience while it looked into the problem. This morning, the company released a fix to its iOS app in the form of version 8.1.5, so make sure you visit the App Store to update if you've been affected by the issue. Direct Link

Twitter for Mac Now Available From Mac App Store

When Apple announced macOS Catalina at the Worldwide Developers Conference and unveiled its new Catalyst feature that would allow iPad apps to be easily ported over to the Mac, Twitter was one of the upcoming apps shown off. ‌macOS Catalina‌ launched on Monday, and as of today, the Twitter for Mac app is now available. ‌macOS Catalina‌ is required to download and use the new app, as it is built using Catalina technologies. Twitter discontinued its prior Twitter for Mac client more than a year ago, which wasn't a popular decision with Twitter users. At the time, Twitter said that it was ending support for the app to focus on a Twitter experience consistent across platforms, and recommended Mac users use Twitter on the web. Because Apple's Catalyst initiative makes it easier for apps designed for iOS to be brought to the Mac, Twitter has decided to reintroduce its Mac app, which shares similarities with the Twitter for ‌iPad‌ app. Design wise, it's in line with the iPhone and ‌iPad‌ apps, but Twitter in June said that it has all of the features that users expect from a Mac app such as multiple windows, window resizing, drag and drop, dark mode, keyboard shortcuts, notifications, and more. Twitter for Mac can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Twitter 'Unintentionally' Used Some Customer Data Provided for Account Security for Advertising Purposes

Twitter's support account today announced that Twitter used some customer email addresses and phone numbers that were provided for account security for advertising purposes, which Twitter says was done "unintentionally." More specifically, email addresses and phone numbers were used in Twitter's Tailored Audiences and Partner Audiences advertising systems. Tailored Audiences is a feature that's designed to let advertisers target ads to customers based on the advertiser's marketing lists, while Partner Audiences is similar. According to Twitter, when an advertiser uploaded a marketing list, it "may have matched" people on Twitter to their list based on the email or phone number the Twitter account holder provided for security purposes. We recently found that some email addresses and phone numbers provided for account security may have been used unintentionally for advertising purposes. This is no longer happening and we wanted to give you more clarity around the situation: https://t.co/bBLQHwDHeQ— Twitter Support (@TwitterSupport) October 8, 2019 Twitter says that it "cannot say with certainty" how many people were affected, and the company has issued an apology. "We're very sorry this happened and are taking steps to make sure we don't make a mistake like this again," reads a help document. Personal data was not provided externally with partners or other third parties, and as of September 17, the issue has been fixed and phone numbers and email addresses collected for account security are no longer being used for

Twitter Expands Direct Message Search to All Users

Twitter today announced that its Direct Message (DM) search feature is now available to all users, allowing anyone to search through the DMs they've received. The new search bar is located above the the DM interface in the Twitter app or on the web and it can be used to locate specific conversations and key words. DM search first debuted in August, when Twitter said that it was testing out the feature. Some users have had the search bar since then as part of the test, but as of today, it's available for everyone. Get your search on. DM search is rolling out to everyone on iOS today.— Twitter (@Twitter) October 1, 2019 Twitter can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Twitter Now Lets You Pin and Swipe Between Up to Five Lists

Twitter today implemented a feature that's designed to allow lists of Twitter users to be pinned to the Home screen and swiped between, allowing for easy access to multiple customizable timelines. Twitter users are now able to add five lists to the Twitter app, swiping between them on the Home screen. With this new feature, Twitter users can do things like group coworkers, friends, and family into different lists, and then with a swipe, view just tweets from each individual list. Lists have long been used as alternative timelines by Twitter users, allowing people to follow accounts without having to add them to the main Twitter timeline, but the new feature makes it easier to do so. On our list? Make lists even better for you! ✅Now on iOS, you can pin up to five lists, rearrange them, and swipe to access from home. pic.twitter.com/gNdfNE1DCl— Twitter (@Twitter) September 23, 2019 As Engadget points out, this is a feature that Twitter has been testing since the summer and has finally rolled out to all users. Twitter has also changed the design of list pages, introducing header images and making it easier to see list members and who is subscribed to a given list. Lists can still be private or public, and there's still an option to follow public lists from other

Twitter Rolls Out New 'Hide Replies' Feature to Users in U.S. and Japan

Twitter today rolled out its new "Hide Replies" feature in the U.S. and Japan, providing Twitter users with more control over the replies that are visible following a tweet. The idea behind the feature is to give people more control over the conversations they start on the social media platform, so they can hide replies that are offensive and the hidden reply won't show up to others as a response to the original tweet. The company has been experimenting the Hide Replies feature since June, and says it saw "a lot of positive trends" during its initial test in Canada. According to Twitter, people with access to the feature mostly hide replies that they think are irrelevant, abusive or unintelligible. It also found that people were more likely to reconsider their interactions when their tweet was hidden. To mitigate concerns that hiding someone's reply could be misunderstood and potentially lead to confusion or frustration, Twitter says it will ask the user if they want to also block that account. As TechCrunch pointed out back in April, Hide Replies has the potential to be controversial because the original person who tweets will be able to control which replies are visible in a conversation thread. However, Twitter is more interested its potential for good, as noted in its blog post: These are positive and heartening results: the feature helped people have better conversations, and was a useful tool against replies that deterred from the person’s original intent. We're interested to see if these trends continue, and if new ones emerge, as we expand

Twitter Testing Feature That Lets You Follow Interests, Support for Live Photos Coming

Twitter this afternoon unveiled several new features that are in the works for the social network, sharing the news at an event for press that was attended by The Verge. Twitter will soon allow users to follow interests in addition to people, which will let users see tweets about topics of their choosing such as sports teams, celebrities, TV shows, and more. The feature, in testing on Android devices, will feature topics curated with Twitter. Individual tweets surfaced for people will be surfaced through machine learning. Twitter is also exploring a option that would let users set up separate lists in the Twitter app to follow individual interests, which Twitter hopes will make the social network a "more powerful interest platform." Other features are in the works too, including searchable direct messages, an option to re-order photos that are included with a tweet, and support for Live Photos. There's no specific word yet on when we can expect to see these features introduced on iOS devices.

Twitter Testing Notifications for New Replies to a Specific Tweet

Twitter is currently trialing a new feature with iOS and Android users that lets them receive notifications of replies to individual tweets. As things are, the Twitter mobile app can ping you with alerts for all the tweets posted by an individual account, but the new feature in testing adds an extra level of granular control by notifying you only of replies to a particular tweet. The option is designed to make following the development of a conversation related to a specific tweet more straightforward, as this can sometimes be difficult if you don't already follow the original poster. You probably have notifications on for your must-follows. Now you can get notifications when there’s a new reply to a Tweet you’re interested in! We’re testing this on iOS and Android now. pic.twitter.com/MabdFoItxc— Twitter (@Twitter) August 8, 2019 The news follows several other features that have recently been trialed or rolled out on the social media platform, all with the aim of handing over more control to users and creating a "healthier service" by cutting down on abuse and harassment. They include a snooze button to temporarily silence notifications from the app, and a Hide Replies feature that lets users collapse replies to their tweets. The latter is designed to allow users to moderate conversations by keeping them on topic and hiding trolls where

Twitter Tests 'Snooze' Feature That Temporarily Silences Notifications

Twitter is testing a "Snooze" button that allows you to pause push notifications from the mobile app for an allotted time. Discovered by tech blogger Jane Manchun Wong, the experimental feature lets users temporarily snooze push notifications for one hour, three hours, or 12 hours. As Wong notes, the setting should come in handy for users who want to prevent their phones from incessantly buzzing because their tweet went viral, or if they just want to turn their attention away from social media for a while. In its present incarnation the feature appears as a crossed-out bell icon in the top-right corner of Twitter's notifications tab. Tapping the icon brings up a sheet of three snooze durations to choose from. Twitter is testing Snooze feature, allowing users to pause notifications for 1 hour, 3 hours or 12 hours!I wrote a blog for the first look of this unreleased feature https://t.co/EoNYaRHraQTip @Techmeme pic.twitter.com/qm3aMM2Q00— Jane Manchun Wong (@wongmjane) August 6, 2019 When a snooze time is set, users don't receive push notifications from Twitter, but notifications still appear in the notifications tab. The feature is independent of any system-level notifications settings for the app, and can be disabled with another tap of the Snooze icon. Snooze was discovered in Twitter's Android app. The social media company often trials new features on one platform or in select territories before rolling them out globally if the testing phase is considered a success. Twitter has been experimenting with ways to give more control to users as it works

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Gives Talk to Apple's Marketing Department

Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter and Square, visited Apple headquarters on Tuesday to give a talk to employees, according to a report by Bloomberg. The billionaire's address at Apple is said to be one of several speakers talking to select Apple staff as part of an ongoing series. Dorsey reportedly spoke with employees from the marketing department, and while the address may highlight shared principles, it's not thought to be suggestive of a new collaboration between Dorsey's companies and Apple. While the address itself didn't point to a new partnership between Dorsey's companies and Apple, it was indicative of their bond and existing collaboration. Apple promoted Twitter as an iOS app coming to the Mac this fall, and the social media service is deeply integrated into both the iPhone and iPad. Apple was also among the first retailers to sell Square's now-common credit-card reader.As Bloomberg notes, Apple teased that Twitter would be one of the first companies to exploit its new Project Catalyst technology that makes it easier for developers to bring ‌iPad‌ applications to the Mac. Strictly speaking though, the Twitter app for iPhone and ‌iPad‌ is currently no more integrated than any other third-party iOS app. Apple's mobile OS did used to include built-in support for Twitter, but the integration was removed in 2017 with the release of iOS 11 –– perhaps in anticipation of Apple's upcoming privacy-focused login feature, Sign In with Apple. Twitter has since relied on iOS shared extensions just like all the other social networks it competes with. We stand with @

Twitter Starts Rolling Out Updated Website With New Design

Twitter today announced the launch of a new Twitter.com experience on the desktop, which includes several new features and design changes. The Twitter website on desktop has a whole new look that's cleaner and more modern, along with support for bookmarks so you can save tweets plus an easily accessible Explore page for getting a quick look at what's trending. Design wise, it's similar to the Twitter for mobile experience. Account switching can be done using the side navigation bar, which is an easier way to manage multiple accounts. The new Dim and Dark Mode Lights Out themes have been added, and there are other new color options to personalize your profile. So fresh, so clean. The updated https://t.co/JFPfsFhrLg is here. We heard you, and here’s some of what’s new: Built-in personalization, like colors and text size ☑️More visible features, like Lists and Bookmarks ☑️And so much more! Let us know what you think. https://t.co/Q5nkCw9Y2n— Twitter Design (@TwitterDesign) July 15, 2019 Conversations are easier to follow thanks to new conversation threading tools, and along with better access to bookmarks, the new web experience offers up quick access to lists and profile options. On the Twitter.com website, some people will see an option to enable the new look now, and Twitter says it will be launching for everyone in the near future.New features and a new look are launching soon. Bookmarks, account switching, dark mode, and so much more -- before long, you'll be able to see what's happening even faster.Twitter has long been teasing its updated web

Twitter Bringing Mac App Back Using Apple's Project Catalyst

Apple last week unveiled Project Catalyst, an initiative designed to allow developers to port their iPad apps to the Mac. At the time, Apple named several partners, including Twitter, and today, Twitter provided more detail on its upcoming Mac app. Twitter says that it will leverage its existing iOS codebase to bring Twitter to the Mac, but will add native Mac features on top of its existing ‌iPad‌ experience to make the app better suited for the Mac.We are excited that Project Catalyst will enable us to bring Twitter back to the Mac by leveraging our existing iOS codebase. We'll also be able to add native Mac features on top of our existing ‌iPad‌ experience, while keeping our maintenance efficient as we continue to improve this shared codebase in the years to come.Twitter previously had a Twitter for Mac app that was discontinued in February 2018 with Twitter directing Mac users to instead use the Twitter for web experience. The prior Twitter for Mac app never received much attention for Twitter. In 2015, the company said that it would refocus its efforts on building new features into the Mac app, but even after new features were added, the app didn't catch on and earned largely negative reviews in the App Store. According to Twitter, the prior version of the Mac app was discontinued because it was not sustainable to maintain two separate codebases. Twitter wanted to focus on web and mobile instead of Mac, but with the new Twitter for Mac able to use the existing iOS codebase, there's less work to be done to make a Mac app available.The new Twitter for Mac

Twitterrific 6 Launches on iPhone and iPad With Autoplay Videos in Timeline, GIPHY Integration, and Much More

The Iconfactory today announced it has released a significant update to its popular third-party Twitter client Twitterrific for iPhone and iPad. The latest version of the app contains over 50 new features, improvements, and bug fixes. Key features of Twitterrific 6:Auto-playing media in the timeline: Videos and GIFs silently auto-play directly in the timeline. If there is audio, it does not play unless the speaker button is tapped. This feature can be disabled if desired. Full images in the timeline: Tweets or direct messages with a single photo, video, or GIF will now display the media attachment at full size, aka its native aspect ratio. Tweets with more than one photo still show the attachments in a grid to help preserve screen space, but with an improved layout and face detection. GIPHY integration: There is a new button to easily add GIFs from GIPHY when composing a tweet or direct message. Quoted tweets with media: When quoting another tweet, users can now attach photos, a video, or a GIF, a feature introduced by Twitter last month. The timeline displays both the quoted tweet and the media attached. Improved attachment previewing: Users can now tap the small thumbnail of attached media for a larger view, and more easily add accessibility descriptions to all images, videos, and GIFs.Twitterrific has also gained a fresh redesign, a new SF Rounded font, five new themes, three new app icon choices, a dozen new iMessage stickers, accessibility improvements like a new high contrast text option, and much more. Twitterrific 6 is a new product with a new

TweetDeck for Mac Gains New Compose Window With Support for GIFs and Polls

Twitter today updated its TweetDeck for Mac app to introduce a new compose window with a refreshed look and new capabilities. The updated window features a cleaner design with either a dark theme or a light theme based on your preferences. In the screenshot below, the darker theme is depicted, with the original window on the left and the new window on the right. The compose window now includes support for adding GIFs to a tweet, a new addition to TweetDeck, and there's also an option for creating a poll. A new emoji picker has been added, and support for image descriptions and tags is new. TweetDeck is providing an option to swap between the new compose window and the old, so those who prefer the original interface can stick with it for the time being. Guess what? You're in luck! As of today we're testing a new way of Tweeting, now with the ability to add GIFs, threads, polls, emoji AND image tagging via TweetDeck 🎉🙌🎊— TweetDeck (@TweetDeck) May 16, 2019 The new features are part of a server side update, so you don't need to download a new version of the app to get the updated compose window. TweetDeck for Mac can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Twitter Fixes iOS Bug That Accidentally Stored and Shared Location Data

Twitter today announced that it has addressed an iOS bug that caused the service to inadvertently collect and share location data. On the Twitter support site, Twitter says that for iOS users who had more than one account on Twitter and opted into sharing location information on one account, location data may have been collected when using any other account on the same device, even if location features were not activated. Twitter also says that some of that location data was mistakenly sent to one of its advertising partners, but the data was "fuzzed" so that only zipcode or city data was shared. The location data was not able to map precise movements nor was it tied to Twitter handle.Separately, we had intended to remove location data from the fields sent to a trusted partner during an advertising process known as real-time bidding. This removal of location did not happen as planned. However, we had implemented technical measures to "fuzz" the data shared so that it was no more precise than zip code or city (5km squared). This location data could not be used to determine an address or to map your precise movements. The partner did not receive data such as your Twitter handle or other unique account IDs that could have compromised your identity on Twitter. This means that for people using Twitter for iOS who we inadvertently collected location information from, we may also have shared that information with a trusted advertising partner.Twitter says that its partner did not retain the location data and it was only available on their systems for a short time before

Photos, Videos, and GIFs Can Now Be Added to Retweets on Twitter

Starting today, Twitter users can put images, videos, and GIFs in retweets on mobile apps and mobile browsers, with the feature set to expand to the desktop in the future. To add a photo, video, or GIF to a retweet or quoted tweet, users can choose the retweet with comment option and then choose a media type from the toolbar. On the Twitter design account, Twitter said that implementing this small change was difficult because it needed to be added in a way that fit well in the Twitter timeline.During the first usability test, we found it was challenging for people to quickly understand all the content in a Retweet with media. This was due to the layout; two large Tweets stacked on top of each other. To improve comprehension, we focused on creating hierarchy, prioritizing the author's voice, and providing more context around the Tweet being Retweeted.To make quoted tweets and retweets with media make sense, Twitter ultimately decided to make photos, videos, and GIFs full width while showing the original tweet in a condensed, indented box. Exciting news: Today we are launching the ability to Retweet with GIF, photos, and video!We find solutions to many challenges as we build for a global, vocal audience. Here is a glimpse into our process as we worked on this feature. https://t.co/PUMr9DRQ0K— Twitter Engineering (@TwitterEng) May 6, 2019 Tweets with this new formatting are visible solely on mobile devices at the current time, so the layout will look different and not up to date on the

Twitter to Launch 'Hide Replies' Feature in June

Twitter today confirmed plans to begin experimenting with a "Hide Replies" feature starting in June, which will provide Twitter users with more control over the replies that are visible following a tweet. As TechCrunch points out, this has the potential to be controversial because the original person who tweets will be able to control which replies are visible in a conversation thread. The feature will be experimental, so it could ultimately be tweaked or scrapped entirely based on how users react to its implementation. Twitter has said that hidden responses wouldn't show up automatically, but would be viewable by others using a menu option. Along with announcing the new feature, Twitter today also shared details on its efforts to create a "healthier service" through cutting down on abuse and spam. Twitter says that it has suspended three times more abusive accounts within 24 hours of a report compared to the same time last year, 2.5 times more private information has been removed, and there's been a 45 percent uptick in efforts to suspend users who create a new account after a suspension. In the future, Twitter says it plans to introduce additional safety-related features, such as making it easier for Twitter users to share specifics when reporting abuse, adding more notices within Twitter about rule enforcement, and debuting rules that are easier to

Twitter for iOS Gains Darker Dark Mode With New 'Lights Out' Option

Twitter today announced that the Twitter app for iOS devices has been updated with a new "Lights Out" feature that makes the existing Dark Mode option even darker. The new Lights Out toggle is available in the Settings section of the Twitter app and it can be used in conjunction with the current ‌Dark Mode‌ feature to make ‌Dark Mode‌ just a bit darker for OLED displays. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said in January that Twitter was working on a new ‌Dark Mode‌ option in response to complaints suggesting that the existing ‌Dark Mode‌ was more of a dark blue than a black. It was dark. You asked for darker! Swipe right to check out our new dark mode. Rolling out today. pic.twitter.com/6MEACKRK9K— Twitter (@Twitter) March 28, 2019 The ‌Dark Mode‌ that existed before today's update is now the "Dim" ‌Dark Mode‌ in a blue/gray color, while Lights Out uses a pure black color palette. Twitter has also added an Automatic ‌Dark Mode‌ feature on iOS for turning on ‌Dark Mode‌ automatically based on timezone. 👋 Twitter, welcome to the dark(er) side.We’re excited to finally share the updated dark mode, and @design will talk about it from (you guessed it) a *design* perspective on behalf of @sofo, @bhaggs, @davidk, and many other awesome teammates who brought this to life. pic.twitter.com/JCNhZ365I6— Twitter Design (@design) March 28, 2019 Right now, the new Lights Out option is limited to iOS devices, but it should be expanding to the desktop and Android devices in the near