How to Use the Preview Loupe Tool in macOS

All of Apple's Macs come with Preview, the powerful file viewer that's built into macOS. Preview is the default app that opens up whenever you double-click an image or a PDF, and features several annotation tools for you to use when working with these file types.

The most obvious and oft-used markup tools include things like arrows, lines, ovals, rectangles, and text, but in this article we're highlighting what is arguably one of the more under-appreciated of Preview's annotation options: the Loupe tool.


The Loupe tool is useful if you want to zoom in on certain areas in an image or document for the purposes of clarity or to bring attention to something in particular.


You can access the Loupe tool by selecting Tools -> Annotate -> Loupe from the Preview menu bar, or by enabling the Markup toolbar and then clicking the bottom right icon in the Shape menu.


Once you've added a loupe to your image, you can easily increase or decrease its magnification level by dragging the green circle along the loupe's circumference.


Similarly using your mouse, drag the blue circle outwards or towards the center of the loupe to expand or contract the area of magnification.

You can add multiple loupes to the same image or document, and even have them overlap to zoom in on an area that's already magnified.


Additionally, if you arrange two loupes so that one is stacked on top of or behind the other, you can right-click (or Ctrl-click) them to rearrange their order using the contextual menu options Bring Forward, Bring to Front, Send Backward and Send to Back.

You can easily delete a selected loupe with the Delete key, just remember that the Loupe is an annotation tool rather than a simple zoom function, so if you save or export the file with a loupe still in use then it becomes a permanent feature of that image or document.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave

Apple Ending Safari Support for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 in March 2020

Apple today announced on its WebKit blog that it is ending support for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 starting in March 2020. TLS, or Transport Layer Security, is a security protocol used to protect web traffic.

Ahead of the planned deprecation, Apple recommends apps adopt TLS 1.2, which offers "security fit for the modern web." Upgrading from TLS 1.0 and 1.1 provides the following benefits, according to Apple:
- Modern cryptographic cipher suites and algorithms with desirable performance and security properties, e.g., perfect forward secrecy and authenticated encryption, that are not vulnerable to attacks such as BEAST.
- Removal of mandatory and insecure SHA-1 and MD5 hash functions as part of peer authentication.
- Resistance to downgrade-related attacks such as LogJam and FREAK.
TLS 1.2 is the standard on Apple platforms and already represents 99.6 percent of connections made from Safari. Apple says TLS 1.0 and 1.1 account for less than 0.36 percent of all connections.

Other browsers, including Firefox, Chrome, and Microsoft's Edge, are also planning to drop TLS 1.0 and 1.1 support starting in early 2020.

Dell Introduces World's First 49-Inch Curved Ultra-Wide Monitor With 5120x1440 Resolution

Dell today introduced what it claims is the world's first 49-inch curved monitor with an ultra-wide 32:9 aspect ratio and a resolution of 5,120×1,440 pixels.


The UltraSharp 49 is equivalent to two Thunderbolt Displays or other 27-inch Quad HD displays side by side. The expansive screen space can be used to display one desktop, or two with a picture-by-picture mode that displays two different Mac or PC sources side by side using the same keyboard and mouse.

The monitor is compatible with the latest 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro models, with connectivity via a single USB-C cable that delivers up to 90W of power. Other connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, one DisplayPort 1.4 port, five USB 3.0 downstream ports, and two USB 3.0 upstream ports.

The 3800R curvature of the screen enables a panoramic, immersive experience with a consistent focal length across the screen for eye comfort, according to Dell. The monitor has a viewing angle of 178° both vertically and horizontally.

The monitor has an IPS panel and LED backlight, with a 1000:1 contrast ratio and a peak brightness of 350 nits. DCI P3 isn't supported, but it does show 99 percent of the sRGB color gamut. The monitor comes with a height-adjustable stand that tilts, swivels, and is compatible with VESA mounts.

The UltraSharp 49 has a 60Hz refresh rate when driven by a Mac or PC with powerful enough graphics, but it lacks Nvidia G-SYNC or AMD FreeSync technology, so it isn't the best option for gamers. Instead, Dell is primarily marketing the monitor to those who work in fields related to finance and data analysis.

Anyone who could benefit from a massive amount of uninterrupted desktop space will likely find value in the UltraSharp 49, but the luxury comes at a cost. Dell says the monitor will be available Friday, October 26 in the United States, starting at a pricy $1,699.99. Its model number is U4919DW.

Tag: Dell

Adobe Announces Creative Cloud Updates for Photoshop, Lightroom, Illustrator and Launches Premiere Rush

At its annual Adobe Max Creativity Conference, Adobe today announced a range of updates that are being introduced to its Creative Cloud software.

Creative Cloud apps that include Photoshop CC, Lightroom CC, Illustrator CC, InDesign CC, Premiere Pro CC, and Adobe XD are receiving new features, and Adobe is introducing Adobe Premiere Rush CC, the company's new all-in-one cross-device video editing app that's simple to learn and use.


Some of the new features include the following:
  • Photoshop CC - New Content-Aware Fill workspace powered by Adobe Sensei, expanded undo and auto-resizing options, a new Frame Tool for creating image placeholders, Symmetry Painting for creating artwork with mirrored brushstrokes, and a new Home screen with tutorials.

  • Lightroom CC - People View for better organization, search improvements, a Share tab, Apple Photos migrator for importing an Apple Photos library to Lightroom, and several other improvements.

  • Illustrator CC - Support for photorealistic Freeform gradients, global edits, Adobe fonts integration, and a customizable toolbar.

  • InDesign CC - Content-Aware Fit feature and contextually-aware Properties Panel.

  • Dimension CC - New rendering engine with improved performance, and better workflow integration with Photoshop and Illustrator.

  • Adobe XD - New features for creating experiences on voice-powered devices like Amazon Echo.
Premiere Rush, Adobe's new app designed for those who may not be as experienced with video work, is designed to provide an all-in-one experience with tools for capturing video, editing video, and adding color, audio, and motion graphics.


Premiere Rush, available on multiple platforms including iPad, iPhone, and desktop, includes tools for publishing straight to various social networks like YouTube and Instagram, along with built-in access to Motion Graphics templates in Adobe Stock and a one-click auto-duck feature for adjusting music and normalizing sound.

Along with new features for its Creative Cloud apps, Adobe is updating its Adobe Stock app with new search features powered by Adobe Sensei, Adobe's artificial intelligence engine, along with GoPro clips. Adobe Stock is Adobe's content marketplace for photos, videos, images, templates, and more.

Improvements announced in September for Premiere Pro, After Effects, Character Animator, and Audition are also launching today.

Overall, Adobe says that its 2019 Creative Cloud release is designed to provide significant performance and usability improvements, better cross-platform app integration, more intuitive collaboration features and faster access to file assets.

Photoshop's new Content-Aware Fill tool

Full details on all of the new updates and features announced at Adobe Max can be found on Adobe's website.

Adobe's new Creative cloud updates are available to all Creative Cloud subscribers, with plan options outlined on Adobe's pricing website. Premiere Rush CC, Adobe's new software, is available starting at $9.99 per month for individuals. Premiere Rush CC is also included in the All Apps, Student and Premiere Pro CC single app plans and comes with 100GB of CC storage.

Tag: Adobe

Apple Expands Its Elk Grove Campus in California

Apple is expanding its Elk Grove, California campus with an additional office building, according to the Sacramento Business Journal.

Apple's new office space via Elk Grove Economic Development

Apple paid $4.2 million for a one-story, 24,400-square-foot building at 2216 Kausen Drive, one block from the campus, according to property records reviewed by the publication. A spokesperson for Apple confirmed the building is part of the ongoing expansion and development of its Elk Grove operations.

The report, citing a city official, says the building is zoned for office use, suggesting that it could be used as additional space for AppleCare support representatives. Apple also has a large distribution center in Elk Grove, along with a repair and refurbishment facility for iPhones and other products.

Apple has been expanding its Elk Grove campus since 2011, and now has over 5,000 employees working there, the report claims. Apple has had a presence in the city, just south of Sacramento, since the early 1990s.

Beyond its headquarters in Cupertino, California, Apple also has a campus in Austin, Texas that handles AppleCare support.

Developers’ Opinion of Mac App Store Improving, but Many Still Unhappy With Lack of Upgrade Options and Free Trials

Setapp, a company that offers a subscription service for Mac apps, today published the results of an annual survey querying Mac app developers on the state of the Mac App Store.

Many Mac developers continue to be unhappy with the Mac App Store and fewer are choosing it for app distribution, but Apple's efforts to improve the Mac App Store in Mojave have improved opinions in some cases. To get the data for this survey, Setapp queried a total of 814 developers.

Just 22 percent of Mac app developers choose to distribute their apps exclusively through the Mac App Store. 32 percent, up from 30 percent last year, distribute their apps outside of the Mac App Store entirely, while 46 percent sell their apps both in the Mac App Store and outside of the Mac App Store.


Developers continue to make more money outside of the Mac App Store for the most part, with 59 percent earning more revenue without the Mac App Store and 41 percent earning more money through the Mac App Store.

Despite the fact that fewer Mac developers are using the Mac App Store, among those who do exclusively sell through the Mac App Store, overall opinion has improved. Those who sell outside of the Mac App Store and both through the Mac App Store and outside of it also had a higher overall opinion, though it still trends toward the negative.

Mac App Store developers happy with the Mac App Store

51 percent of developers surveyed said that providing Apple with a 30 percent cut of revenue is worth it, an impressive jump from the 31 percent that said the same thing in 2017.

Compared to 2017, when developers were upset with Apple's sandboxing practices and named it as a key reason for avoiding the Mac App Store, opinions have improved. Sandboxing is no longer seen as a critical issue.


Developers are, however, concerned with a lack of pricing upgrade options, no analytics, and an inability to offer trials.

Developers who do not choose the Mac App Store said they avoided it because of the unclear app review process, 30 percent revenue share, and lack of trials.

This year, 20 percent of developers decided to switch to a subscription model for their apps, and 52 percent of those said that it had an overall positive impact on their business. Of those using subscription models, increased revenue and an active growing user base were cited as positives.

Full details and comparisons between data collected in 2016 and 2017 can be viewed on Setapp's survey website, which also includes details on how developers view the Setapp service.

Review: OWC's Updated Thunderbolt 3 Dock Adds 85W Charging, 10 Gbps USB-C Port, and microSD Slot

Nearly a year and half ago, OWC was one of the first companies to launch a Thunderbolt 3 dock, offering over a dozen ports of various types to support a variety of accessories. While I loved the sheer number of the ports offered on the original version of the dock, there were some shortcomings, including a lack of any 10 Gbps USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports and only 60 watts of charging power, which may not be enough for 15-inch MacBook Pro users.

Users for whom those two concerns are dealbreakers will be glad to hear that OWC is launching an updated version of its Thunderbolt 3 dock in just a few weeks, addressing these issues.


The new OWC Thunderbolt 3 Dock is exactly the same size and shape as the original, with a horizontal design constructed of an aluminum band (in silver or space gray) wrapping all the way around the sides and glossy black plastic on the top and bottom.

All ports are clearly labeled in white, and there is an OWC logo and "Thunderbolt 3 Dock" branding printed on the front of the dock. The dock measures in at a hair over 9 inches wide by 3.5 inches deep and an inch tall. It weighs about 1.2 pounds, although as a desktop dock you're not likely to be moving it around very often so weight shouldn't be much of a factor.

Because OWC's new dock is so similar to the original version, I'm not going to walk through all of the features, and I'll instead focus on the differences. But rest assured, the new version continues to have five USB-A ports running at 5 Gbps, a pair of Thunderbolt ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, a Mini DisplayPort port, and S/PDIF output and combo 3.5 mm audio ports. Two of the USB-A ports (one front and one rear) offer 1.5A of power for faster charging of connected devices.

New version on top, original model on bottom

As for new additions, OWC has added two additional ports on the front of the dock: a microSD card slot that complements the SD card slot from the original version, and a new 10 Gbps Type-C USB 3.1 Gen 2 port. Both of these are great additions that many users will find handy.

New version on top, original model on bottom

I tested out the new 10 Gbps USB-C port on the front of the dock using a fast CalDigit Tuff external SSD, and I saw solid speeds coming in at over 500 MB/s read and 480 MB/s write. Speeds when connected to one of the 5 Gbps USB-A ports came in at around 350 MB/s read and 325 MB/s write, which typical for this drive over that type of connection.

Speed test using 10 Gbps USB-C port and external SSD

One connectivity option you'll find missing compared to the original version of the dock is a FireWire 800 port, which was formerly located near the center of the dock on the rear. It's not a particularly surprising omission given the continuing decline in use for the standard and the fact that OWC had previously dropped the port from its main Thunderbolt 3 dock lineup. The loss of the port won't be an issue for the vast majority of users, but if you happen to still need FireWire connectivity you'll need to look at other dock options.

If you're a 15-inch MacBook Pro user, you'll be glad to hear that OWC has bumped up the charging capabilities in the new dock to 85 watts from the original 60 watts. That'll be enough to charge up your MacBook Pro at the same speed as from Apple's power adapter, and it'll keep your machine powered up even under heavy loads.

135-watt power brick from original version (left) vs. 180-watt power brick for updated model (right)

It's a very welcome improvement, but it does come at the cost of a larger external brick needed to support the increased power. The power brick included with the new dock is 180 watts, up from 135 watts in the original version. That increases the brick's size fairly significantly, but in most cases you'll be able to tuck it away somewhere and not have to worry about it.

Overall, the new Thunderbolt 3 Dock from OWC is one of my top picks among all of the docks I've tested. CalDigit's TS3 Plus has been my go-to dock since its release, but OWC's dock now gives it a run for its money with the array of ports and full 85-watt charging power that put it just about on par. OWC's dock will be priced at $299, which is competitive with other high-end Thunderbolt 3 docks, some of which can run up to $350 or more. OWC says the new dock will be available from its online store at macsales.com and at other retailers starting in early November.

Note: OWC provided the Thunderbolt 3 Dock to MacRumors free of charge for the purposes of this review. No other compensation was received. MacRumors is an affiliate partner with macsales.com and may earn commissions on purchases made through links in this article.

Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 67 With Bug Fixes and Feature Improvements

safaripreviewiconApple today released a new update for Safari Technology Preview, the experimental browser Apple first introduced over two years ago in March of 2016. Apple designed the Safari Technology Preview to test features that may be introduced into future release versions of Safari.

Safari Technology Preview release 67 includes bug fixes and feature improvements for Pointer Events, WebRTC, Media, CSS, JavaScript, Web Animations, Shadow DOM, Web API, Apple Pay, Web Inspector, Web Driver, and Storage.

The new Safari Technology Preview update is available for macOS Mojave, the newest version of the Mac operating system that was released to the public in September, and macOS High Sierra.

The Safari Technology Preview update is available through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store to anyone who has downloaded the browser. Full release notes for the update are available on the Safari Technology Preview website.

Apple’s aim with Safari Technology Preview is to gather feedback from developers and users on its browser development process. Safari Technology Preview can run side-by-side with the existing Safari browser and while designed for developers, it does not require a developer account to download.

Astropad's Luna Display for Turning an iPad Into a Second Screen for Mac is Now Available

Introduced as a Kickstarter project in 2017, Astropad's Luna Display adapter turns any iPad into a second wireless display for the Mac.

The Astropad software alone is designed to mirror the Mac's display to an iPad, while the Luna Display, which plugs into a Mac using Mini DisplayPort or USB-C, extends the Mac display instead of mirroring it.


Once Luna Display is plugged into a Mac and the Luna Display software has been downloaded, a connected iPad serves as an extension of the Mac, letting Mac content be accessed directly from an iPad.


Astropad began taking pre-orders for Luna Display back in July, and with those orders fulfilled, the adapter is now widely available and can be purchased from the Luna Display website for $79.99.

How to Take a Screenshot on Your Mac

In macOS Mojave, Apple has introduced a screen capture interface that unifies the screenshot and screen recording features on Mac, making accessing them easier from one place.

A new floating palette brings the traditional Mac screen capture functions together under a single menu. You can access it by hitting Command-Shift-5. Let's take a closer look at what's on offer.


The three buttons to the left of the first menu divider provide you with options to take a screenshot of the entire screen, a selected window, or a selected portion of the screen.

Note that the keyboard shortcuts for these actions still function as before in macOS. Taking a screenshot is as easy as hitting Shift-Command-3 to capture the whole screen, or Shift-Command-4 to capture a portion of the screen using the mouse cursor as a crosshair selection tool (a tap of the spacebar also turns it into a camera for capturing windows).

Meanwhile, on the right of the palette's first divider are two buttons to begin a screen recording – taking in the whole screen or just a portion of the action. These actions were previously only accessible in the macOS Grab utility.


If you choose to capture a window, hover your mouse cursor over it: The window will be highlighted and your cursor will change to a camera. Simply click your mouse button to take the capture.

If you're capturing a selected portion of the screen, use the mouse cursor crosshairs to select the area you want to capture. When you take a screen recording, a button will appear in the menu bar for you to click when you're ready to end the recording.

You can click the rightmost button on the palette to reveal an additional menu of options for controlling other variables, like where you want your captures to be saved (Desktop, Documents, Clipboard, and so on) and whether to include a 5 or 10-second delay before the capture takes place, giving you time to get your screen in order.

As you'd expect, unchecking the Show Mouse Pointer option ensures the mouse cursor doesn't appear in your capture. The Show Floating Thumbnail option takes a little more explaining.

When you take a screenshot or screen recording in Mojave, a floating thumbnail appears in the bottom corner of the screen, just like it does when you take a screenshot on an iOS device running iOS 11 or later.

Clicking on the thumbnail opens the capture in a window, which includes image Markup tools, or a clip trimming option in the case of recordings, as well as options to share the image/recording or delete it if it didn't turn out like you wanted.

If you're taking multiple screenshots in sequence, you probably won't want the floating thumbnail showing up in subsequent captures, which is why the option to turn it off exists.

For additional tips on controlling the behavior of screenshots using keyboard shortcuts, click here.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave

How to Recover Files, Contacts, Bookmarks, Calendars and Reminders in iCloud

Apple has little known iCloud tools that are designed to let you recover files that have been deleted from iCloud, as well as recover Contacts, Calendars, and Reminders that have been lost.

Lost iCloud data isn't a situation that comes up often, but these tools were introduced following an iCloud Drive bug in 2015 that caused some users to lose documents stored in iCloud Drive, prompting the creation of the tool.


Accessing Your Files on iCloud.com



  1. Visit the iCloud.com website on your web browser of choice.

  2. Enter your Apple ID, password, and two-factor authentication code if the feature is enabled.

  3. Once logged in, click on the "Settings" app in the main iCloud menu.

  4. Scroll down to the bottom of the page until you reach the "Advanced" section.

  5. Click on the content that you need to restore. Options include files stored in iCloud Drive, a list of contacts, your Calendars and Reminders, or your Bookmarks.

Restoring Files


Using the "Restore Files" option on iCloud.com brings up a list of all files that have been deleted over the past 30 days. It includes files from apps that support iCloud Drive, such as Pixelmator, Napkin, and Byword.

You can select a single file to restore or multiple files, should there have been a catastrophic event that caused iCloud Drive to be wiped entirely. Check the box to make a selection and click "Restore File." Using the file restoration tool returns the file in question to iCloud Drive in its original parent folder, much like undeleting a photo on iOS.


Deleted iCloud Drive files remain available in iCloud for 30 days before being permanently deleted, at which point they become unrecoverable. As a side note, you cannot do a manual permanent deletion with iCloud Drive files as you can do with Photos on iOS - they're sticking around for the full 30 days.

Restoring Contacts, Calendars, and Reminders


Apple regularly archives a list of Contacts, which can be restored to an iOS device at any time. Restoring a list of contacts from the archive will replace the contacts on all iOS devices connected to your iCloud account, while archiving the current list of contacts to ensure nothing is lost. Contacts can't be restored one by one -- this is an all or nothing batch operation.


Restoring Calendars and Reminders works like restoring Contacts. Apple frequently creates a backup for the two apps, capturing snapshots for more than a month. Any of these archives can be used to replace a current Calendar or Reminder list, replacing the existing information on all connected iOS devices.


Restoring a Calendar will remove all sharing information, so Calendars and Reminders shared with friends and family will need to be shared again. All scheduled events will also be cancelled and recreated, reissuing all invitations for events.

Restoring Bookmarks


Along with Contacts and Calendars, Apple backs up the bookmarks that you have removed from your Bookmarks list in Safari on a regular basis.


To restore them, simply choose the deleted bookmarks you would like to put back in place and then choose the "Restore" option.

Conclusion


Most users probably won't need to delve into the Advanced settings that will restore content like this, but it's nice to have a backup should something disastrous occur. It's also useful because it enables people to restore key information to a new iPhone or iPad without having to work from a full backup.

iCloud settings are also handy for immediately signing out of all browsers that are signed into iCloud should you suspect someone has gained unauthorized access to your account and for managing apps that let people look you up using your Apple ID. It also displays all devices you're signed into, offers up a look at available storage, and displays the members of your Family Sharing group.

Quicken 2019 for Mac Launches With Web Access

Quicken today announced the launch of Quicken 2019, the newest version of its popular finance and budgeting software for PC and Mac.

Quicken 2019 introduces web access for the first time, designed to allow Quicken customers to manage their finances online using Chrome, Safari, and other web browsers.


Users are able to check their balances, monitor transactions, view budgets, check spending trends, view past expenses, and access info on their accounts and investment holdings at any time.

A customizable web dashboard created for the web access experience lets customers customize their personal view to see full details on all features Quicken has to offer or a streamlined view with just essential information.
"Millions of people use Quicken to help them manage their financial lives. Because Quicken is important to them, our community of users is incredibly engaged. We prioritize updates primarily based on feedback from these users, and adding web access was the number one requested enhancement," said Eric Dunn, Chief Executive Officer of Quicken. "As an agile, independent company, we've been able to deliver this highly-anticipated feature, among other exciting new customer-inspired updates, on schedule and with great quality. This increased pace of releases and improvements is something our customers can count on and look forward to in the future."
Quicken 2019 also features several enhancements on the desktop, which are designed to offer up an overall faster experience. Quicken for Mac, for example, is up to twice as fast.

The software opens up quicker, charts and graphs load twice as fast, and backing up is four times faster than it was in previous versions of Quicken.

Quicken in 2018 launched a new monthly membership feature so customers who pay for a subscription will get access to Quicken 2019 at no additional cost. There are several plans available for purchase at different price points.

Quicken Starter with budgeting is available for $34.99 for a one-year membership, while Quicken Deluxe is available for $49.99 per year.

Quicken Premiere, with portfolio monitoring functionality and tax advice, is priced at $74.99 per year, while Quicken Home & Business is priced at $99.99.

Tag: Quicken