Hands-On With LG's $1,500 34WK95U UltraWide 5K Display

At CES in January, LG debuted a new UltraWide 5K display, the 34WK95U, which just recently launched. We managed to get our hands on one of the new super huge monitors, and we checked it out in our latest YouTube video.

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LG's UltraWide 5K display is far from cheap, priced at $1,499, which makes it more expensive than many of Apple's notebooks and the new Mac mini. For that price, it includes a 34-inch Ultrawide 21:9 Nano IPS display, a 5120 x 2160 resolution with a 60Hz refresh date, HDR support, and Thunderbolt 3 connectivity.


Design wise, the display features a curved base with height and tilt adjustment features, with several ports available on the back. There's a Thunderbolt 3 port, two USB-A ports, a DisplayPort, 2 HDMI ports, a USB Type B port, and a 3.5mm headphone jack. It supports up to 85W of power delivery, enough to power Apple's 15-inch MacBook Pro, and there are a set of 5W speakers at the bottom.


There's a single control button on the display that you'll need to use if you want to adjust features like brightness or speaker volume, with controls not available in macOS.

You can connect LG's UltraWide display to any of Apple's Thunderbolt 3-compatible Macs, including the new MacBook Air, the new Mac mini, and recent MacBook Pro models.

At 34 inches, the UltraWide monitor offers up a huge amount of screen real estate to work with, ideal for photographers, designers, and videographers. The 5K display of the monitor looks great, and while we didn't think it quite matched the crispness of the iMac Pro, we appreciated the extra space.


It's worth noting, however, that at its full 5120 x 2160 resolution spread over 34 inches, everything ends up looking quite tiny, but running at 2560 x 1080 as a Retina display results in content appearing too large. As a result, the best solution is to run at a scaled sweet spot resolution of 3360 x 1417, which gives you ton of screen real estate, and despite the scaling, content still looks good.

Some customers who have purchased the UltraWide 5K Display have run into compatibility issues with the 2018 MacBook Pro models equipped with 560X graphics cards, with an update in the works to fix it. We tested the UltraWide 5K Display with a MacBook Pro model equipped with a 555X graphics card and found similar issues, although Apple has just released macOS 10.14.2 and the release notes mention a fix for what sounds like a similar but not identical issue, so we'll be checking to see if performance improves for us.

The LG 34WK95U UltraWide 5K Display is undoubtedly a gorgeous display, but its high $1,500 price tag means that it's firmly aimed at creative professionals and not for the average consumer. Combine that price tag with the compatibility issues we and others have run into, and it's hard to recommend this display, at least until we're confident Apple and/or LG have the kinks worked out.

What do you think of LG's UltraWide 5K Display? Let us know in the comments.

Note: LG provided MacRumors with 34WK95U UltraWide 5K Display for the purpose of this video, and it was returned following the conclusion of filming. No other compensation was received.

Tag: LG

Apple Releases macOS Mojave 10.14.2, Resolves 2018 MacBook Pro Issue With External Displays and Other Bug Fixes

Apple today released macOS Mojave 10.14.2, the second update to the macOS Mojave operating system that first launched in September. macOS Mojave 10.14.2 comes three weeks after Apple launched macOS Mojave 10.14.1 with Group FaceTime support and new emoji.

macOS Mojave 10.14.2 can be downloaded by going to the "Software Update" section of System Preferences, a new installation method that was introduced with the Mojave update.


The 10.14.2 update introduces performance improvements and bug fixes for issues that weren't addressed in macOS Mojave 10.14.1. There were no major feature changes discovered during the course of the beta testing period.

macOS Mojave 10.14.2 release notes:
  • Adds RTT (real-time text) support for Wi-Fi calling.
  • Adds a menu item to News for opening a story in Safari.
  • Resolves an issue that may prevent iTunes from playing media to third-party AirPlay speakers.
Enterprise-related:
  • Allows administrators to enable FileVault via MDM for mobile accounts and users created by MDM.
  • Allows users to reset their login password at the login window when that password has expired via a password policy.
  • Resolves an issue that prevents displays from working when connected to MacBook Pro models introduced in 2018, if certain third-party USB graphics devices are also connected.
Additional details on the macOS Mojave operating system can be found in our dedicated Mojave roundup.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave

Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 71 With Dark Mode Enhancements, Bug Fixes, and Other Improvements

safaripreviewiconApple today released a new update for Safari Technology Preview, the experimental browser Apple first introduced over two years ago in March of 2016. Apple designed the Safari Technology Preview to test features that may be introduced into future release versions of Safari.

Safari Technology Preview release 71 includes bug fixes and feature improvements in a number of areas, including the most substantial tweaks to Dark Mode in several months.

The new Safari Technology Preview update is available for both macOS High Sierra and macOS Mojave, the newest version of the Mac operating system that was released to the public in September.

The Safari Technology Preview update is available through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store to anyone who has downloaded the browser. Full release notes for the update are available on the Safari Technology Preview website.

Apple’s aim with Safari Technology Preview is to gather feedback from developers and users on its browser development process. Safari Technology Preview can run side-by-side with the existing Safari browser and while designed for developers, it does not require a developer account to download.

Mac Developers Reminded to Have Their Apps Notarized as Apple Tightens Security

Apple today reminded Mac developers that it is encouraging them to have their apps notarized, meaning that the apps have been scanned by Apple and checked for malware and other security issues.


Notarization is not currently a requirement for apps distributed outside of the Mac App Store, but Apple says it will "more prominently highlight notarization status" starting in the spring of 2019. And in an unspecified "upcoming macOS release," Apple will require any Developer ID-signed apps to be notarized.
When users on macOS Mojave first open a notarized app, installer package, or disk image, they'll see a more streamlined Gatekeeper dialog and trust that it does not contain known malware. Starting spring of 2019, macOS Mojave will more prominently highlight notarization status. In an upcoming macOS release, Gatekeeper will require Developer ID–signed software to be notarized by Apple.
Apple introduced the notarization process for macOS Mojave back in June at WWDC, providing an extra level of confidence for users that apps are free of malware while also giving Apple finer-grained controls to shut down specific problematic releases instead of having to revoke an entire Developer ID.

Apple has stressed that notarization is not a full app review process and is only intended to analyze apps for security purposes.

Deals: B&H Photo Discounts 2017 MacBook Pro and 12.9-Inch iPad Pro to New Low Prices

In a new flash sale that began today, B&H Photo is offering the 2017 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (3.1 GHz, 16GB RAM, 256GB SSD) for $1,599.00, down from $1,999.00. This is a custom configuration of the older MacBook Pro, and a solid discount for anyone willing purchase a previous generation model and not the latest 2018 MacBook Pro.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Also at B&H Photo, the retailer has numerous versions of older 2017 models of the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, with discounts reaching to as much as $330 off original prices for both Wi-Fi Only and Wi-Fi + Cellular models.

These represent the lowest-ever prices for every iPad Pro listed below, so be sure to visit B&H Photo and check out the sale before it ends later this week. We've listed the models currently available for order as of writing, but the full list (including those on backorder) can be found in our Deals Roundup.


Wi-Fi + Cellular
Wi-Fi Only
There are a few other flash sales happening today at Best Buy and Woot. To start, at Best Buy you can get the Beats Pill+ portable speaker in Black for $108.99. The Pill+ is currently priced around $129.99 at places like B&H Photo and Walmart, and was originally $229.99 when it launched in 2015.


At Woot, you can buy refurbished models of the iPhone X at discounted prices, with the 64GB marked down to $659.99, from $999.99. The 256GB model is available for $749.99, down from $1,149.99. Woot explains that these iPhone X models "are expected to have a moderate level of wear & tear including (but not limited to) scratches, dents, and dings. Outside of their physical appearance, they have been tested to be in full working condition."

Be sure to keep an eye on our full Deals Roundup as you shop around this holiday season.

Related Roundup: Apple Deals

iFixit Begins Selling 2018 Mac Mini RAM Upgrade Kit, Save Up to $275 Versus Apple

Unlike the previous 2014 model, the 2018 Mac mini has user-upgradeable RAM. The repair experts at iFixit are now selling a do-it-yourself RAM upgrade kit for the 2018 Mac mini that can save you hundreds of dollars.


The upgrade kit includes 16GB or 32GB of 2,666MHz DDR4 RAM, the same type of memory Apple uses in the 2018 Mac mini, along with all of the tools and bits needed to complete the upgrade: an iFixit opening tool, a spudger, angled tweezers, a precision bit driver, and three types of 4mm Torx precision bits.

2018 Mac mini models are equipped with 8GB of RAM by default, but they can be configured with 16GB or 32GB of RAM on Apple's online store for an extra $200 or $600 respectively. By comparison, iFixit charges $164.99 for its 16GB kit and $324.99 for its 32GB kit, reflecting savings of $35 and $275 respectively.

Three things to keep in mind:
  • This is iFixit-branded RAM that matches Apple's specifications.
  • If you ever need in-warranty service on your 2018 Mac mini, and Apple detects that you opened up the computer, the Genius Bar may deny service. However, iFixit says this is illegal in the United States under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.
  • There is a risk of damaging the Mac mini if the upgrade is not completed carefully.
Those interested in proceeding can follow iFixit's 2018 Mac mini RAM replacement guide.

iFixit also sells the 16GB RAM modules individually for $159.99 each.

Related Roundup: Mac mini
Tag: iFixit
Buyer's Guide: Mac Mini (Buy Now)

How to Get Unique Alerts for VIP Emails Received on Your Mac

In the last installment of our regular how-to series, we showed how you can set up an iOS device to get unique alerts when emails are received from your VIP contacts. In this article, we're going to show you how to do the same thing on your Mac.

In the native Mail application in macOS, the standard way of ensuring you receive new message notifications from VIPs is to go into Mail's Preferences and select VIPs in the New message notifications dropdown list.

Setting up VIP alerts this way is all well and good, but it prevents you from receiving notifications for all other messages coming into your inbox.


A better solution would be to set up a rule in Mail that plays a specific sound or bounces the Dock icon when a message is received and the sender is in your VIP list. Here's how to do it.

How to Get a Unique Alert for VIP Emails


  1. Launch the Mail app on your Mac.

  2. Select Preferences... from the Mail menu bar.

  3. Select the Rules tab.

  4. Click Add Rule.

  5. Give your rule a name in the Description field.

  6. For If, select Any.

  7. For the first condition, select Sender is VIP from the first dropdown list.

  8. Under Perform the following actions: select Play Sound from the first dropdown list. (Another option available here is Bounce Icon in Dock.)

  9. Under Perform the following actions: choose a sound to play from the second dropdown list.

  10. Click OK.

  11. Click Apply.
With the rule set up, you'll now get a unique alert for every VIP mail you receive that you'll be able to distinguish from regular new message notifications as they come through.

Apple Seeds Fourth Beta of macOS Mojave 10.14.2 to Developers [Update: Public Beta Available]

Apple today seeded the fourth beta of an upcoming macOS Mojave 10.14.2 update to developers, two weeks after seeding the third beta and a month after releasing the macOS Mojave 10.14.1 update.

The new macOS High Sierra 10.14.2 beta can be downloaded through the Software Update mechanism in System Preferences after the proper profile has been installed from Apple's Developer Center.


We don't yet know what improvements the second update to macOS Mojave will bring, but it is likely to include bug fixes and performance improvements for issues that weren't able to be addressed in the macOS 10.14.1 update.

No new features were discovered in the first three 10.14.2 betas, but we'll update this post if anything new is found in the fourth beta.

macOS Mojave 10.14.2 comes shortly after the release of macOS 10.14.1, an update that brought support for Group FaceTime on the Mac and introduced new emoji characters.

Update: Apple has also made a new public beta of macOS 10.14.2 available to its public beta testers.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave

How to Manage File Associations in macOS

In macOS, the Open With contextual menu that appears when you right-click (or Ctrl-click) on a file provides links to all the applications installed on your Mac that are associated with that file type.


At the top of the list is the default app that macOS launches whenever you double-click on files that share the same suffix or extension, with other apps associated with the file type below that, and an Other... option at the bottom which lets you choose an alternative app in case the one you want to use isn't listed.

You can easily change the default app associated with a particular file to something else. To do so, click Get Info in the contextual menu and select another app from the Open With: dropdown list in the file's Info pane. To use that app to open all files sharing the same extension, click the Change All... button and select Continue.

Clearing the Open With Menu


If you've installed a lot of applications on your Mac through the years, you may find that some apps appear in the Open With menu that really have no business being there given the kind of file you've selected.

As well as unrelated apps, you may even see references to "ghost" apps that you removed from your Mac long ago. All of which results in a long and cluttered list of launch service links you won't use.

Unfortunately the list isn't directly editable, but there are a couple of ways that you can clear the cruft from it. One option is to grab Titanium Software's free Onyx system utility and run a task to rebuild the Launch Services database.


Alternatively, if you're comfortable with a command prompt you can open a Terminal window and run the following command, which does the same thing:

/System/Library/Frameworks/CoreServices.framework/Frameworks/
LaunchServices.framework/Support/lsregister -kill -r -domain local -domain system -domain user



Leave the command to run for a few minutes while the LaunchServices database rebuilds, and when the prompt reappears type killall Finder and press Enter to see the changes take effect.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave

How to Use Your Mac's Media Keys to Adjust Speaker Volume on a DisplayPort, HDMI, or Thunderbolt Monitor

If you connect your Mac to an external display, you may find that the Mac's on-screen and keyboard volume controls are disabled. That's because HDMI, DisplayPort, and Thunderbolt connections carry a fixed volume digital audio signal, so the external device (in this case, a monitor) controls the sound level.


This can be frustrating if the volume controls on your external display are concealed in the bezel or buried in a fiddly on-screen menu. Fortunately, it is possible to re-enable your Mac's native volume controls and use them to adjust the sound level coming out of your monitor's speakers. The steps below show how it's done, although you will need administrator privileges to follow them.

➜ Click here to read more...

'Shadow of the Tomb Raider' Coming to macOS in 2019

Feral Interactive today announced that the third game in the rebooted Tomb Raider series, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, will be coming to macOS and Linux computers in 2019. As usual with Feral's early announcements, no specific date was given for the game's release on macOS.


The game originally launched on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Windows PC in September 2018, published by Square Enix and developed by Eidos-Montréal. Shadow of the Tomb Raider picks up the story from the 2015 entry in the series, Rise of the Tomb Raider, and follows Lara Croft as she hunts for the legendary hidden city of Paititi in the jungles of South America, battling the Trinity organization and attempting to prevent a Mayan apocalypse.

Shadow of the Tomb Raider will follow Rise of the Tomb Raider's appearance on macOS earlier this spring, in the form of the "20 Year Celebration" edition of the game that included all DLC content. Feral announced Rise of the Tomb Raider would be coming to Mac in February and then launched it in April, so we should hear more about a specific launch date for Shadow of the Tomb Raider after the new year.


Feral also ported the original rebooted game, simply titled Tomb Raider, to macOS and Linux computers.

How to Rebuild the Spotlight Index on Your Mac

Apple has enhanced Spotlight search in macOS in recent years, with the addition of Spotlight Suggestions allowing it to tap into a variety of online data sources like weather and sports. Nevertheless, helping you find apps, documents and other files stored on your Mac is still what Spotlight does best.

That's not to say its core function is infallible, however. If Spotlight can't find files that you know exist on your Mac, or if it stops prioritizing results based on your earlier searches, then it's probably a sign that your system's search index is damaged somehow.

If you're experiencing odd behavior when using Spotlight, you should try rebuilding its search database index. There are Terminal commands that will do the job, but you can achieve the same result via the regular macOS user interface in just a few quick steps. Here's how.

  1. Select System Preferences... from the Apple () menu at the top left of your screen.

  2. Click the Spotlight pane.

  3. Click the Privacy tab.

  4. Click the Add (+) button.

  5. Select the folder or disk whose index you wish to re-build, then click Choose. Alternatively, drag the folder or disk into the list. We've chosen Documents in our example.

  6. In the same list, click the folder or disk that you just added and then click the Remove (-) button.

  7. Click the red traffic light button to close System Preferences.
Once you've completed these steps, Spotlight will begin reindexing the contents of the folder(s) or disk(s) you chose, which may take some time and a few processor cycles. Depending on which version of macOS you're running, you may see a rebuild progress indicator in Spotlight's menu bar item. With a bit of luck, your Spotlight problems will have been resolved once indexing is complete.

You can also perform a system-wide re-index of the Spotlight database, among many other optimizations, using Titanium Software's free Onyx utility, which is available for all recent versions of macOS.

Related Roundup: macOS Mojave