Chrome Apps Gaining OS X Finder Integration to Open Mac Files by Default

Google has launched a new feature for its experimental Chrome Canary browser for Mac, enabling a beta function that allows users to open local Mac files using Chrome apps in Finder. Using the feature, Chrome apps can be associated with OS X files, bringing Google one step closer to replacing desktop functionality with its browser.

For example, the Chrome Text app can be used to open any Mac text file, as seen in the screenshot below. The Text app shows up as an option right alongside native options like TextEdit.

chromecanarybeta
It is now possible to get OS integration of file associations for Chrome Apps in Chrome Canary for Mac.

All you need is to enable the experimental chrome://flags/#enable-apps-file-associations flag and restart your browser.
Enabling this flag in Canary Chrome will let users choose installed Chrome apps as an option when opening an associated file, with the apps behaving as native Mac apps. As noted by Gigaom, the process functions through app manifests, which allow developers to specify which apps are compatible with different file types via file handlers.

While the feature is currently limited to Chrome Canary for testing purposes, many Canary functions eventually make it to Google's stable Chrome browser. There is no word, however, on when the new feature might make it out of testing as there are still several bugs to work out.

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8 months ago
Chrome is like a parasite, embedding itself in host OS - to promote Google's web platform :eek:
Rating: 22 Votes
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8 months ago

Google will be selling even more of your personal info to advertising companies.


Exactly. It took me a while to understand Google's motives although they had made it clear early on. They want to control the world's data.

I switched from iOS when my old phone broke and I didn't have money for an iPhone. I switched back from Android when to download even a basic app, I had to give it access to my phone book and call list.

There is nothing a person cannot do in MS Office, iWork, or Star/Open/Libre that they can with Google docs, except unwillingly and unwittingly give away my private data to Google.

With "free" Google software the user is the product.
Rating: 9 Votes
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8 months ago
What use would that be?
Rating: 8 Votes
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8 months ago
While this is fully optional... Who would prefer their crappy web apps over ANYTHING else?

MAYBE a business who has gone all google, and does everything in the google cloud.

Maybe.
Rating: 8 Votes
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8 months ago

What use would that be?



Google will be selling even more of your personal info to advertising companies.
Rating: 7 Votes
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8 months ago
I seem to have forgotten my tinfoil hat
Rating: 7 Votes
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8 months ago
Oh sweet, finally 64 bit chrome for mac!

wait, wait, no. just some other chrome garbage getting updated first.
Rating: 6 Votes
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8 months ago

I seem to have forgotten my tinfoil hat


No this is not tinfoil hat material. NO ONE gives away their product for free. Google has spent many hours developing their products and they want paid for it. It is clearly stated in the privacy policy.

Google Free apps are paid for by advertising. For advertisers to get their money's worth they want it localized. Google anonymously gives private info to their clients. Many people do not mind this. I refuse to be part of it. Both choices are valid.

Apple Free apps are paid for by selling hardware and cloud space.

Microsoft Office apps are paid for by subscription.

It is your choice but I strongly dislike Google's business model and have removed all their apps from OS X and Chrome from IOS.

I may be in the minority, but I would rather pay a monthly fee for no ads and (some) privacy.
Rating: 5 Votes
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8 months ago

Google Free apps are paid for by advertising. For advertisers to get their money's worth they want it localized. Google anonymously gives private info to their clients. Many people do not mind this. I refuse to be part of it. Both choices are valid.


It's entirely acceptable to not like the way Google structures its business, but at least understand exactly what they're doing.

First, they're not giving away private data. If you used their services, they wouldn't be collecting info on a "PhilipK", you'd just be a number that gets tracked jumping from website to website, or by clicking certain advertisements. It's all analytics, and it'd be amazingly difficult to figure out who you are by the random number that's been assigned to you.

Think of it as you being node 5570431256. Node 5570431256 likes to visit Mac forums, and also likes cameras. If a respectable number of others nodes who start out at Mac forums tend to visit camera forums, they've built up a knowledge base, and know that Mac sites are a good place to advertise cameras. Your name isn't directly tied to any of this, only your anonymous node.

Secondly, they don't sell their analytics to companies. That'd be Google giving away their golden goose, since they'd only be able to sell that once, and it'd be entirely out of their hands. What they do instead is sell adspace. Using the example above, a camera manufacturer wants to advertise their product. They go to Google, who says "yeah, we know where to put your adverts so they get the most views", then offers up a price to do so. Google then starts placing camera ads on Mac forums.

Now I can understand why some people wouldn't like that, but the whole setup is nowhere near as insidious as some people make it out to be. I don't use ad supported apps simply because I don't like getting ad popups, not because I'm worried about them selling my medical records off to advertisers.
Rating: 4 Votes
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8 months ago

It's entirely acceptable to not like the way Google structures its business, but at least understand exactly what they're doing.

First, they're not giving away private data. If you used their services, they wouldn't be collecting info on a "PhilipK", you'd just be a number that gets tracked jumping from website to website, or by clicking certain advertisements. It's all analytics, and it'd be amazingly difficult to figure out who you are by the random number that's been assigned to you.


I disagree... I interviewed with them and they knew exactly who I was.
Rating: 3 Votes
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