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Apps on iPhone 5s Reportedly Crashing Twice as Often as on iPhone 5c and iPhone 5

iphone-5sAccording to a study by mobile application mangement platform Crittercism, iOS apps are twice as likely to crash on the new iPhone 5s as they are when running on the iPhone 5 and 5c, reports AllThingsD.

The app crash rates on the iPhone 5s are attributed to the unforseen issues that developers have had transitioning to the new internals of the iPhone 5s, such as rewriting drivers and code for the phone's 64-bit A7 chip and M7 coprocessor. Apple notably began allowing developers to submit 64-bit apps for the iPhone 5s on September 16, just four days before the launch of the device itself.
“Anytime there is new hardware or software release, we see issues,” Crittercism CEO Andrew Levy said in an interview. “Inevitably, over time, those issues get resolved.”

Levy said that perhaps the reason the iPhone 5s is seeing more crashes than the equally new iPhone 5c is that, while developers were able to check their apps for compatibility with iOS 7 during several months of beta testing, the new hardware wasn’t available ahead of time. The iPhone 5s packs a new 64-bit A7 chip and an M7 coprocessor, while the 5c is nearly identical, internally, to the iPhone 5.
However, the company compliments Apple for releasing two updates in quick succession for iOS 7, stating that the company is "doing a really good job of addressing these issues as they come up.” Since its launch last month, a number of noteworthy apps have been redesigned or optimized for the iPhone 5s, with more developers stating that they will update their apps to accommodate the new processor in the near future.

Related roundup: iPhone 6

Top Rated Comments

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13 months ago

If you put lipstick on a pig, it's still a pig.


Hey, leave Android out of this discussion! That was a low blow.
Rating: 90 Votes
13 months ago
Twice the GPU.
Twice the speed.
Twice the number of crashes.
Rating: 52 Votes
13 months ago
Well, duh. 64-bit = 2x 32-bit.
2x the bits = 2x the crashes.
Mo' bits, mo' problems. :D
Rating: 27 Votes
13 months ago
If you put lipstick on a pig, it's still a pig.
Rating: 22 Votes
13 months ago
The NSA must be using too much RAM when they attempt to pull all the finger prints from the 5S :rolleyes:
Rating: 17 Votes
13 months ago

Hey, leave Android out of this discussion! That was a low blow.


And here come the Trolls......
Rating: 16 Votes
13 months ago
Yep, I've noticed this.

New processor = more optimization.

It'll get worked out, but it sucks right now.
Rating: 11 Votes
13 months ago

Well, duh. 64-bit = 2x 32-bit.
2x the bits = 2x the crashes.
Mo' bits, mo' problems. :D


Mo' bits, mo' problems. :)
Rating: 10 Votes
13 months ago
Hence why I'm skipping iOS7 all together and waiting for iOS 8. I felt like this release was rushed with all the work being done on the "makeover". This reminds me of iOS 3.

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Hey, leave Android out of this discussion! That was a low blow.


At least Google's native icons are consistent. :D
Rating: 10 Votes
13 months ago

I guess it is a 64bit problem then.


Yeah, 64 bit some developers, all right.

I could go off on a rant about Objective-C and iOS memory management practices in apps and libraries, but the basic problem is that it allows programmers access to pointers and, if you work with C structures, even allows you to allocate based on size. These are the things that kill apps in transition from one memory model to another. Modern languages like C# and Java isolate the programmer from these things, and you can develop code that runs equally well on any architecture, with the libraries and runtime handling any interaction with non-managed components.

Programs should never make any assumptions about the size of addresses, values, structures, or objects.
Rating: 8 Votes

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