Unbox Therapy


'Unbox Therapy' Articles

Tests Show 32GB iPhone 7 Models Have 8X Slower Data Write Speeds Than Other Capacities

A couple weeks ago GSMArena reported that its tests showed that 32GB iPhone 7 and 7 Plus models had slower storage performance than 128GB and 256GB models. Today, Unbox Therapy's Lew Hilsenteger posted a video featuring several speed tests that confirm that 32GB iPhone 7 models have slower data write speeds than other configurations. In the video, the free PerformanceTest Mobile [Direct Link] app is used to test the devices, a 32GB iPhone 7 and a 128GB iPhone 7. Both devices have similar read speeds, with the 32GB model reading at 656MB per second and the 128GB model reading at 856MB per second. However, there's a larger discrepancy in the model's write speeds. While the 128GB model writes at 341MB per second, the 32GB model writes at 42MB per second, nearly 8 times slower than the higher capacity model. Hilsenteger then performed a real-world test more representative of what a user might encounter, using a MacBook and USB cable to transfer movies over to the two iPhone models. The 256GB model wrote the 4.2GB movie in 2 minutes and 34 seconds while the 32GB model wrote the same file in 3 minutes and 40 seconds. Larger capacity SSDs often perform better than smaller capacity SSDs because its controller has access to more NAND flash memory chips, according to How-To Geek. Manufacturers have to place more NAND chips in higher capacity SSDs, and when they do they place them in parallel to each other. This means that the SSD controller has an easier time accessing more of the memory than a controller in a smaller capacity SSD, which wouldn't have the NAND chips in

Apple Addresses 'Bendgate' By Strengthening Weak Points of 'iPhone 6s' Shell

Following the launch of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus last September, some users began experiencing issues with the larger-sized smartphones bending in their pockets after normal day-to-day usage. The issue -- informally known as "Bendgate" -- became widespread after a video test revealed it does not take much force to cause a slight curvature in the device. iPhone 6 Plus bend test by Lewis Hilsenteger of Unbox Therapy Apple later commented that an iPhone 6 Plus bending under normal use is "extremely rare," adding that it had received only nine complaints from customers about the issue at the time. The company said the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus feature a "precision engineered unibody enclosure" constructed from 6000 series anodized aluminum and "stainless steel and titanium inserts to reinforce high stress locations" on the devices. Nevertheless, it appears that Apple engineers have tweaked the design of the so-called "iPhone 6s" by strengthening the weak points of the smartphone's rear shell. A new YouTube video shared by Unbox Therapy shows that the areas around the Home and volume buttons on the "iPhone 6s" appear to be notably thicker -- 1.9mm versus 1.14mm -- suggesting that Apple's next iPhones could be less susceptible to bending under normal usage. Interestingly, the video shows that the "iPhone 6s" rear shell is also slightly lighter, despite having a thicker shell at certain weak points. The purported "iPhone 6s" rear shell weighs in at 25 grams, compared to 27 grams for the iPhone 6 rear shell, suggesting that Apple could be using a new material

Apple Watch's Sapphire Crystal Display Evaluated With Diamond Tester

YouTube channel Unbox Therapy has shared a new video that tests the stainless steel Apple Watch with a basic diamond tester to determine if it actually has a sapphire crystal display like many regular mechanical watches. The video also tests the Apple Watch Sport, LG G Watch R, iPhone 6 and a Tissot watch that is verified to have a sapphire crystal display. The results of the test confirm that the Apple Watch does have a sapphire crystal display as advertised, with the diamond tester recognizing the thermal conductivity of the scratch-resistant material. The verified Tissot watch also displays a reading on the meter, while the Apple Watch Sport, LG G Watch R and iPhone 6 do not yield any results because all three devices have traditional or ion-strengthened glass displays. Sapphire crystal is a harder and more scratch resistant material than traditional glass, which is why Apple chose it for the more expensive Apple Watch and Apple Watch Edition display and lenses of the heart rate sensor. Apple cut the sapphire crystal with a diamond-encrusted wire to allow for a precise fit and polished it with diamond-covered pellets for a smooth and glossy finish."Sapphire is the second-hardest transparent substance after diamond," reads the Apple Watch materials page. "That’s why we chose it to cover the Apple Watch and Apple Watch Edition faces, and to make the lenses of the heart rate sensor. Our sapphire crystal comes from the highest-quality boules. Only the purest, clearest, and strongest sapphire crystal is harvested. To ensure a precise fit for the case, the crystal