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Intel Launches First Eighth-Generation Core Processors, Paving Way For Quad-Core 13-Inch MacBook Pro

Intel today introduced its eighth-generation Core processor lineup [PDF] coming to notebooks later this year.


The first four eighth-generation processors launching today are U-series chips suitable for the 13-inch MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and Mac mini. They're all 15W chips with four cores and eight threads, paving the way for a quad-core 13-inch MacBook Pro should Apple choose to release one.

The new Core i5 and Core i7 chips have integrated Intel UHD Graphics 620, and support both DDR4-2400 and LPDDR3-2133 RAM.

Given the lack of LPDDR4 support, which allows for up to 32GB RAM, a new 13-inch MacBook Pro with an eighth-generation Core processor would likely remain capped at 16GB of RAM. Apple marketing Phil Schiller explained why last year.


Notebooks using the eighth-generation chips can get up to 10 hours of battery life, consistent with the current 13-inch MacBook Pro.

Intel said eighth-generation processors appropriate for desktops like the iMac will be available in the fall, while processors appropriate for the 12-inch MacBook and 15-inch MacBook Pro are vaguely listed as coming soon.

The eighth-generation Core i5 and Core i7 chips are up to 40 percent faster than the equivalent seventh-generation Kaby Lake processors, according to Intel, based on the benchmark tool SYSmark 2014 SE on Windows 10. That tops Intel's original claim that the chips would be up to 30 percent faster.

The test compared Intel's quad-core Core i7-8550U processor, with a base frequency of 1.8GHz and Turbo Boost up to 4GHz, against its dual-core Core i7-7500U processor with a base frequency of 2.7GHz and Turbo Boost up to 3.5GHz.

Intel also boasted that its eighth-generation Core processors are up to twice as fast as its equivalent five-year-old Ivy Bridge chips. It said users can output a 106-second 4K video in as little as three minutes with a new PC, for example, versus up to 45 minutes on an equivalent five-year-old PC.

Notably, the eighth-generation processors announced today are not part of the upcoming Coffee Lake family. Instead, they're part of what's being called Kaby Lake Refresh, an iteration of the seventh-generation Kaby Lake processors used in the latest MacBook, MacBook Pro, and iMac models.

Intel is expected to eventually announce chips based on Coffee Lake's 14nm++ and Cannonlake's 10nm manufacturing processes that join the eighth-generation Core lineup. In other words, a new generation of Core processors no longer immediately correlates to brand new chip architecture.

Intel said the first notebooks with eighth-generation Core processors will be available in September, but it's unclear when Apple will refresh its Mac lineup — probably not soon. For perspective, Intel launched its Kaby Lake processors in January, and the first Macs equipped with the chips were released in June.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Buy Now)


Top Rated Comments

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13 months ago
Put it in a Mac mini. Please.
Rating: 43 Votes
13 months ago

...can get up to 10 hours of battery life, consistent with the current 13-inch MacBook Pro.


I laughed out loud when I read this line. I know zero MBP users who get 10 hours of battery life. It doesn't even get 10 hours while sitting idle. Sadly, Apple is back to their shady battery life claims.

For me, I couldn't care less about these new chips in the MacBook Pro. What I want is for Apple to fix the design decisions which are hostile to Pro workflows:

1. True 10 hour battery life during a pro workflow

2. More travel on the Keyboard. And make it quieter.

3. A touch-bar free version with full specs. (My guess is the touch bar will go down as a miss in the Apple history books.) A lot of pros I know want to max out their MBP but loathe the Touchbar.

4. Add the SD slot back. Again, breaking professional workflows for aesthetic reasons.

Apple needs to get back in touch with their pro customers, get over Jonny Ive's thinness and simplistic fetishes, and ship a slightly thicker, better MBP that empowers the professional workflow.
Rating: 12 Votes
13 months ago
I remember many years ago Intel was bragging about a processor they made with 80 cores..... Fast forward nearly a decade and they're still peddling 2 and 4 core processors.
Rating: 12 Votes
13 months ago
Sounds great. Now build a MBP without that touchbar and we're in business. And to be clear, by no touchbar I don't mean also make the chips slower and remove two of the ports. The exact same high end MBP, without the touchbar please. Thanks Apple.
Rating: 6 Votes
13 months ago
No new MBP for me until there's one with 32GB. It's a little bit silly at this point. I'm rarely away from a power outlet for more than an hour at a time, and would gladly sacrifice half of that 10 hours of battery life in return for increased memory capacity.
Rating: 6 Votes
13 months ago

Put it in a Mac mini. Please.


What's that?
Rating: 5 Votes
13 months ago
We are about to have DDR5, PCIe 5.0 while the mobile devices already use LPDDR4x and Intel call this an update that still stuck with LPDDR3?
And their comparison is something from 5yrs ago? With what courage do they charge this much of money for this kind of Stagnant evolution. Atleast, support the standards.

I don't wanna even blame Intel anymore. I wanna ask, is Apple just gonna sit idle? All that proprietory OS, motherboard, MacAppStore for nothing?
Rating: 5 Votes
13 months ago

These are revised Kaby Lake chips (Kaby Lake R). Here’s the breakdown for mobile:

Y (5W, 2 cores) = Cannonlake
U (15W/28W, 4 cores) = Kaby Lake R
H (45W, 6 cores) = Coffee Lake

However, they are all 8th generation.

If their goal was to maximally confuse people, they've achieved it.
Rating: 4 Votes
13 months ago

These are revised Kaby Lake chips (Kaby Lake R). Here’s the breakdown for mobile:

Y (5W, 2 cores) = Cannonlake
U (15W/28W, 4 cores) = Kaby Lake R
H (45W, 6 cores) = Coffee Lake

However, they are all 8th generation.


I doubt that the chips Intel released today will end up in any Apple products as while they do have more cores, they have inferior graphics to what is currently in the 13" MBP. These use UHD 620 Graphics, which are apparently a re-brand of HD 620 Graphics with HDCP 2.2 support, and are inferior to the Iris Plus graphics in the current 13" MBP. Apple will probably wait for Coffee Lake which should have versions with GT3e (Iris) graphics.


Intel marketing's ability to make even the simplest things absolutely inscrutable never ceases to amaze me. Would it have killed them to have one "lake" for the eighth generation? And to at least pre-announce whether Iris Plus 15W parts are coming at all?
Rating: 4 Votes
13 months ago

Even if certain limitations prevent Iris graphics in all models, a low power dGPU could be used with the 15W chips.


Will never happen.

Apple will continue to release even more uselessly thin Macbooks. So: no dGPU for 13" and even lower tier dGPU for 15". eGPU is the way ahead for them...

Our only hope for a decent 13" without emoji bar is a 15W quad core chip with GT3e
Rating: 4 Votes

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