CES 2014: NueVue Introduces Antimicrobial Cases for iOS Devices

Friday January 10, 2014 5:07 AM PST by Richard Padilla
U.K. based company NueVue introduced its line of cases for the iPhone, iPad, and iPad mini at CES 2014, which contain screen-cleaning properties and eliminate up to 99% of bacteria on a device's surface. The cases themselves come in cotton twill, leather, and canvas variants lined with antimicrobial microfibers licensed from medical company BioCote, and are also anti-static and shock resistant.

nuevue_cases
Introducing NueVue, a unique and long overdue concept in smartphone and tablet cases. More than just a fun and stylish way to protect your phone or tablet, NueVue cases clean the screen and offer antimicrobial protection, every time you remove the device. Not only is a cleaner screen easier on your eyes, your device stays looking like new - longer.
The introduction of the cases comes as Apple glass supplier Corning announced an antimicrobial version of its Gorilla Glass earlier this week, which incorporate ionic silver into the glass to inhibit growth of bacteria. NueVue's cases will sell for $49.99 in a variety colors and are expected to be available soon.

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Posted: 11 months ago
And not before time. Only last week I caught bubonic plague from my iPad's Smart Cover.
Rating: 12 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago
We have immune systems for a reason.
Rating: 6 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago
Is it me or has CES become a big bore? I see posts like this and think is this really what CES is about now? It seems the nature of the tech industry has changed to the point CES like other big trade shows is obsolete b/c

1) Big companies more frequently host their own private product announcements when product is ready, not when January rolls around, and sites like Verge, Gizmodo, and Engaget are more than happy to supply the publicity.

2) Smaller companies and entrepreneurs with ideas go to crowd source funding to debut product concepts, relying less on retail buyers as a first step.

That leaves CES with big TV (but small viewable content), souped up appliances with smartphone connectivity. (Oooh! I forgot to turn the washing machine on... let me launch the app!), and, yes, more overpriced iDevice cases.
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago

People read books in the bathroom, so I imagine they read iBooks in the bathroom too.

Bleaching an iPad probably wouldn't work so well, though it might help with those moisture sensors.


Hands up, who's reading Macrumors in the can right now?
Rating: 4 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago
I really think all these antibacterial things are a bad idea. There is a reason we now have antibiotic-resistant superbugs beginning to circulate.
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago

I really think all these antibacterial things are a bad idea. There is a reason we now have antibiotic-resistant superbugs beginning to circulate.

Yep. We're breeding them so the "1%" that survive that "99%" of microbes killed are the ones who reproduce. Score one for parnoia marketers, zero for the rest of us.
Rating: 3 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago
"...up to 99%..." Whatever that means.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago
Marketing nonsense.
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago
It's so weird that this seems to be coming to tech. First anti-microbial glass and now cases.

All this while the FDA is challenging all products that are anti-bacterial to demonstrate that there is any benefit at all, since there currently is no real science to back up the claims that they make.

Edit: here's a link in case someone's curious about the FDA http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/16/health/fda-antibacterial/ (http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/16/health/fda-antibacterial/)

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Yep. We're breeding them so the "1%" that survive that "99%" of microbes killed are the ones who reproduce. Score one for parnoia marketers, zero for the rest of us.


From the FDA on Soap:"Millions of Americans use antibacterial hand soap and body wash products," the agency said in a statement. "Although consumers generally view these products as effective tools to help prevent the spread of germs, there is currently no evidence that they are any more effective at preventing illness than washing with plain soap and water.

Further, some data suggest that long-term exposure to certain active ingredients used in antibacterial products -- for example, triclosan (liquid soaps) and triclocarban (bar soaps) -- could pose health risks, such as bacterial resistance or hormonal effects."
Rating: 2 Votes
Posted: 11 months ago
This is BS. If you're worried about bacteria on your tech, do yourself a favor and wash your hands.

When I was in high school, we had this discussion with our English teacher one day about how she was so disgusted that most of the girls who went to the bathroom while she was in there too, did not bother to wash up after doing their business.

Most people don't do it because they think it's a waste of time, especially when you have to do the whole getting your hands wet, putting soap, washing them, and then drying them off. Well, a few years ago I heard on a BBC newscast that they did research and just putting your hands under water for a few seconds is just as good. So you really have no excuse not to just do that.

Stuff like this just drains your wallet. There's absolutely no benefit to it. And even though the bacteria won't get into the leather/cotton/canvas, you know what will? The sweat from your hands, which is far worse.
Rating: 2 Votes

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