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Retina Display Support Coming to Photoshop CS6 and Lightroom 4 in 'Coming Months' [Updated]

Adobe today provided a few more details on its plans for Retina display support on its software, noting that a Retina-compatible version of Photoshop CS6 will be arriving "this Fall". A Retina version of Lightroom 4 will also be delivered "as soon as the work is complete".
Supporting this new technology requires significant work by our product teams and we’re committed to provided a free update to all Photoshop CS6 customers this Fall and Lightroom 4 as soon as the work is complete. Please note that Creative Cloud members will receive Photoshop updates more frequently and receive this update in advance of updates for non-members.
Users of Photoshop Elements should not expect a Retina update in the immediate future, although that team is still looking into adding support for it.

Adobe Photoshop was one of the high-profile applications highlighted by Apple at June's Worldwide Developers Conference as having Retina display support in the works. Adobe, Autodesk, and Blizzard were three major software companies Apple noted it had already been working with on Retina compatibility, but it is still taking some time for developers to make their applications fully compatible with the new ultra high-resolution display found on the Retina MacBook Pro.

Update 1:36 PM: A second blog post notes that Retina support will be coming to many more software titles than just Photoshop and Lightroom.
We expect to update the following products with HiDPI support, free to all CS6 and Creative Cloud customers, over the next few months:

Dreamweaver
Edge Animate
Illustrator
Lightroom
Photoshop
Photoshop Touch
Prelude
Adobe Premiere Pro
SpeedGrade

We are currently evaluating the roadmap for when other products may support HiDPI displays, and we will announce those plans as they are finalized.

Top Rated Comments

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30 months ago

Because Apple suddenly switching from Carbon to Cocoa API's wouldn't have any influence would it.

Yes, it took them a little longer than we would have liked. But Apple pulled the rug right from under them with the change in API.

Suddenly? Apple was warned developer for several years that Carbon would be going away and that it was a stop gap measure to allow for quick ports to OS X in the beginning. It was never meant to be around forever.

They gave plenty of warning about it after depreciating it and that it would not be supported on 64bit systems in the future.
:rolleyes:
They started warning them about it back in the Leopard days already and we are now on Mountain Lion.
Rating: 13 Votes
30 months ago

Because Apple suddenly switching from Carbon to Cocoa API's wouldn't have any influence would it.

Suddenly?
Rating: 11 Votes
30 months ago
Why do people get down on Adobe so much? For crying out loud, they are the ONLY reason there are still macs even around after the travesty of the 90's. You should be on your knees praising them for not abandoning the platform and killing Apple when it was at it's weakest. You have Adobe therefore to thank for your iEverything.

Their software is pretty damn good now as well, even with an 18 month upgrade cycle. How many industries are they the standard for media?

Photoshop
Indesign
Illustrator

In the video world, unless you're doing studio films with Smoke or something along those levels, Premiere and After Effects are respectable as well.

None of the software is perfect, but let's see you design something without bugs for as many different uses and industries as they do their products and get them to work together.
Rating: 11 Votes
30 months ago

Because Apple suddenly switching from Carbon to Cocoa API's wouldn't have any influence would it.

Yes, it took them a little longer than we would have liked. But Apple pulled the rug right from under them with the change in API.


I can't believe people are still replaying this excuse... Are you going to say the same thing when CS7 gets delayed?
Rating: 11 Votes
30 months ago
Adobe always takes forever to update and always has excuses. Just like they had excuses as to why it took forever to update Creative Suite for Mac to be 64-bit while they already offered it for Windows.
Rating: 8 Votes
30 months ago

Adobe always takes forever to update and always has excuses.


It;s like thier creative cloud connection, the desktop creative cloud client, when CS6 was released the said "in a few weeks" it's been over 4 months now and no sign that it's even close. so i'm taking "coming months" as it'll be part of CS7 and then the other apps with be retina in CS9
Rating: 6 Votes
30 months ago

Adobe always takes forever to update and always has excuses. Just like they had excuses as to why it took forever to update Creative Suite for Mac to be 64-bit while they already offered it for Windows.


Because Apple suddenly switching from Carbon to Cocoa API's wouldn't have any influence would it.

Yes, it took them a little longer than we would have liked. But Apple pulled the rug right from under them with the change in API.
Rating: 6 Votes
30 months ago
Looking forward to seeing this in Lightroom 4.
Rating: 5 Votes
30 months ago
The question is: Will I be able to somehow get a retina display for my Mac Pro in the future?

Also, will it blend? Will Safari be snappier? Would Steve Jobs have allowed it?

----------

Still better to the pros than Apple.


I agree since Apple does not make any programs that compete with Adobe products other than Final Cut. I've used Adobe Premier, and it's just like Final Cut Express but much buggier and worse in general.
Rating: 4 Votes
30 months ago
Awesome. Would really love After Effects to get retina support too, though.
Rating: 3 Votes

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